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NEW RN: Need recommendations

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by Emilyyredd Emilyyredd (New) New

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Hello!

I am recently a new graduate from nursing school and will be starting my training in several different Intensive Care units: cardiac, medical, surgical, burn and Neuro.

I am am looking for recommendations on a book or several that I can reference when leaving a shift to study critical care nursing. When I see something at work that I will need to understand fully, I want to be able to go home and study whatever that might be.

Please help :)

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sirI has 30 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

14 Followers; 19 Articles; 13,174 Posts; 137,783 Profile Views

Welcome to allnurses.com

Thread moved to Critical Care Nursing to generate the most helpful replies. Good luck.

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theseriousnurse2b has 1 years experience and specializes in CCU, CVICU, CVRU, Cardiac Cath Lab, RRT.

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Fast Facts for Critical Care by Kathleen M. White is fantastic for a start. The Medscape app is another wonderful resource that is even free!

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GaryRay has 10 years experience and specializes in Pediatric ICU.

3 Articles; 194 Posts; 4,710 Profile Views

Even if you aren't taking ACLS or ABLS yet, get the books and start studying. They are really good references and will help you with decision making. Fast Facts saved my butt more times than I can think of my first year. Don't get too tunnel visioned on the patho, you will pick that up as you go along, focus on meds, best and worst case scenarios (and what you would do if it happened), assessment skills, and interventions your first year.

IE: my patient is in DKA the insulin is what reverses the acidosis and ketones, blood sugar can be normal and the patient still be in DKA. If sugar falls too fast they get cerebral edema/AMS. I need to dipstick every void, perform neuro checks with my finger sticks, and if they are transitioning off the drip make them eat so they can keep getting insulin (rookie mistake people think the glucose is fine and the patient isn't eating so they hold insulin, then the ketones go back up and the pH drops)

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LessValuableNinja has 8 years experience and specializes in Cardiac (adult), CC, Peds, MH/Substance.

754 Posts; 5,435 Profile Views

AACN has some useful stuff. Notably their essentials of critical care and procedure manual (2 different books). If you aren't already a member, it's well worth it. You get sent two critical care journals and have access to old issues online as part of the membership. And free cne.

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ClauICURN has 2 years experience and specializes in Critical Care Nursing.

27 Posts; 599 Profile Views

I recommend The ICU Book by Marino and The Ventilator Book by Owens

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14 Posts; 487 Profile Views

I definitely agree that taking notes on concepts you aren't familiar with (diagnoses, procedures, medications, treatments, etc) and looking them up on your days off will be enormously beneficial as you progress in your career. I recommend a broader book at first (such as Critical Care Nursing Made Incredible Easy) because that will cover a lot of topics you will see throughout your training. As you advance in your rotations and come across more complex patients, you may benefit from a more specialized book and online resources. Good luck!!

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