Jump to content

New nurse stressing out

First Year   (1,548 Views 8 Comments)
by medic978 medic978 (Member) Member

1,517 Profile Views; 29 Posts

I've been in the medical field for more than 6 years in EMS and never felt anywhere near the levels of stress that I do now as a new RN. I feel like I don't chart properly and forget things like getting a 2nd rn initial on a blood bank tube. I don't know what to do I leave work and am constantly plagued by did I do this or that and I forgot this or that. When does it get better I know it may never totally go away but I just don't want to be kept up for hours after I get home worrying about what I did or didn't do at work. I have been a nurse for less than a year and been at this facility in the ER for not quite 4 months.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gooselady has 23 years experience as a BSN, RN.

601 Posts; 7,276 Profile Views

Oh, you are right in the middle of the 'worst' part of every new nurse's first year ((hugs))

You do NOT have to be 'perfect'. If you forget a signature, you'll be reminded. If you forget to do something, anything, USUALLY you'll find out right away, or within a short period of time.

No news is good news :D when it comes to 'OMG, what did I forget???'

Nursing is very cut and dried, for all it's complexity and vague expectations. You'll come to see and feel that as you go on.

You'll come to trust yourself too, over time, as you look behind you and see you have not killed or injured any patients :D nor have you caused a major mistake to happen. There is NO telling any new nurse to 'chill out' because you can't -- but you will :)

Welcome to nursing. This 'self hazing' process is so normal. I wish it didn't happen at all, but it's just so universal.

Your high anxiety -- to an extent -- is a positive indicator that you are on the ball, sensitive to detail (a bit overly but that's normal at first), and will sooner than later be a very good and conscientious nurse.

Hang in there girl! Go easy on yourself, it does get better. You will have to deliberately bring up what GOOD you've done, you may even need to write it out on a list to counterbalance all of your self-criticism.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

29 Posts; 1,517 Profile Views

Thank you I'm a guy though lol I still appreciate what you said

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nursel56 has 25+ years experience and specializes in Peds/outpatient FP,derm,allergy/private duty.

1 Follower; 6,655 Posts; 43,565 Profile Views

Yeah hang in there! Four months on a new job I'm still learning where the bathrooms are...well I do exaggerate a bit...But really this it will get easier. Even for those of us who have been at it for a while, a new environment takes some time to adjust to.

Gooselady's advice is spot on, so I'll stop here. All the best to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

35 Posts; 1,594 Profile Views

Dude... relax. It sounds like you're doing fine. The fact that you're so worried (as has been said before) is a great indication that you're a conscious and caring nurse. That's a great start.

Start concentrating on leaving work at work. I know it's not easy, but try. Taking all that worry home isn't doing anything productive, it's just serving to add stress and doubt to your life. Enjoy your days off. Relax.

At work ask as many questions as you want. Don't feel bad about it. It's the new nurses that never ask questions that scare me the most. Find a few experienced nurses that you trust and use them as resources.

Take it easy on yourself. It's ok to be new, to be unsure, and to question yourself. All of us have been there. Your concern speaks volumes about who you are, you just need to dial it back so it's not hindering you.

You're going to do great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thevez has 1 years experience and specializes in Rehabilitation,Critical Care.

113 Posts; 3,273 Profile Views

Thank you for the advice as well. I'm a new nurse myself and last night I kept thinking about this minor detail if I should have done it or NOT. Then thought about the possible results of what I did. Then I realized thanks to this "NO NEWS IS GOOD NEWS" which is a good thing to remind myself. LOL

I'm a new nurse barely in my 6 months of the socalled real world of nursing.

Hang in there!!!!!!!! You'll get through it.

It's very helpful to write what's in your mind after shifts what you could have done with it and what are your goals for the next shift.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

29 Posts; 1,517 Profile Views

Thanks thevez that's a good idea maybe if I just get out what I'm getting nervous about by writing it out on paper or something that might help I'm learning what to pay more attention to during my shifts as well. Sometimes the whole nights a blur and I don't remember if I did much of anything

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

canadianRPN09 has 2 years experience and specializes in Physicians Office, LTC, Palliative Care.

2 Posts; 578 Profile Views

I am a new grad also, and I know the feeling all too well. I agree with the idea of writing your emotions out on paper.. You will learn a lot about yourself this way!

The only other advice I can give is from my own experience. I often felt so on edge leaving the hospital after a shift on the Surgical Unit.. I would run my entire 12 hour shift through my head during my drive home, ensuring I signed this, emptied that, charted this, blah blah blah.. It wasn't until my palliative care placement in Hospice, where I no longer felt that way. My drives home - although longer, were peaceful. I felt at ease, I could sleep without the anxiety of what was going to happen the next day. I believe this is because I found my area of specialty.. Of course I felt some questions and anxiety, but most importantly I knew what a difference I was making in my patient's and their family/support network's lives. The reason I wanted to become a nurse.. Do you believe ER is your home unit? Could this be the source of your anxiety? ER is a difficult area - I give you HUGE kudos for working there. I believe it is important to know what areas you like and what areas you don't. I hated Rehabilitation.. I'm a helper, I couldn't sit back and watch my patients struggle to perform their ADLs (as rewarding as it is when they prevail). I just knew it wasn't for me. Have you considered other areas of nursing? Do you feel accomplished when you leave the hospital - aside from your anxiety and stress.. I think after you find your groove, you will feel more at ease. But ask yourself those questions.. Maybe you will realize there is something out there meant especially for you. :smug:

I hope this helped? Sorry... I like to ramble.... You should see my charting.. :bored:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×