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New LPN would like CNA input please

Posted

Specializes in Gero Psych, Ortho Rebab, LTC, Psych. Has 20 years experience.

I'm a new lpn in ltc. I would like to know what you would like as far as lpn appreciation. I can't give you a raise and I don't make out the assignment. I try never to add extra work, but being new I can't grab alot of call lights yet. I always make sure to sincerely thank my team at night for their hard work. Is there any advise you can give that will help this new lpn to keep a team approach the evenings that I work? Please keep in mind that I still don't get my meds passed in a timely manner so my time is limited. I will get better at this, but in the mean time....

I worked in an nursing home, and during a specific time things would get really hectic, everyone needed me. I had a LPN, who would see me in doodo up to my elbows, and would come into the patients room to tell me that someone else needed their brief changed or that two other patients needed assistance to the toilet. That wasn't helping me at all, if anything it was adding to my stress level, and I couldn't stop what I was doing midstream to help out those other residents

if that LPN would have taken care of at least one patient for me, it would have helped me out immensely. She also would add unnecessary tasks on to my work load (telling me to dust off the oxygen tank, wipe off wheelchairs)while I was trying to level everything else down.

So the point of my story is that I want a LPN/RN who doesn't mind giving a helping hand to a CNA, to answer a call light here and there to reduce the stress level, to get a patient dressed if they have time. I know all nurses don't have the attitude that "it's not my job to change briefs" but many of the ones I've worked alongside in LTC had that very same attitude. It's one of the reasons why I am reluctant to work in another nursing home.

fuzzywuzzy, CNA

Specializes in LTC. Has 3 years experience.

I try never to add extra work, but being new I can't grab alot of call lights yet. Please keep in mind that I still don't get my meds passed in a timely manner so my time is limited. I will get better at this, but in the mean time....

Make sure they know that!

Keep thanking them at the end of the night. Most nurses don't do that, but it makes a big difference.

The phrase, "when you get a chance" goes a long way. I hate it when I'm expected to drop everything to go do something that's not holding anyone up.

Talk to your CNA's like they are people too. Say hello at the start of a shift. Don't give out unnecessary busy work just because you can, to the only CNA with 30 mostly continent residents who have to be monitored in the bathroom. Even if you hate your job, don't go up and down the hall yelling and cussing about how much your job sucks. It wakes everyone up and doesn't do anyone any good. Can you tell it's been a bad week?

I don't have a lot of experience, so the only thing I can add is just LISTEN to your CNAs. If they're telling you that there's something abnormal with a pt, don't turn your back and start writing on someone elses chart and say "uh huh.." and leave it at that. Listen. Assure us that the resident will get checked on, or you're already aware of it, or whatever. We care about those residents too.

MichaelCNA

Specializes in CNA: LTC.

What a thoughtful post. For me, the simple things matter: Courtesy, respect, and mutual understanding. I feel blessed to work with wonderful RNs and LPNs who were once CNAs, and we complete our tasks each night with constant communication and dedication. Just look out for each other. Communicate each others needs.

ZanatuBelmont

Specializes in Rehabilitation; LTC; Med-Surg.

She also would add unnecessary tasks on to my work load (telling me to dust off the oxygen tank, wipe off wheelchairs)while I was trying to level everything else down. .

OK, I'm an LVN student and work as a PCA on the side, so I understand your frustrations. All I can say is that NOWHERE are we taught in nursing school to ask the CNA/PCA to dust an oxygen tank and wipe off wheelchairs. Next time, tell that nurse it is not within your scope of practice to dust - that is housekeeping duties. If the nurse doesn't believe the equipment is clean enough, she should take that up with the person in charge of mopping, sweeping and dusting.

This is an interesting discussion to me because currently I'm a CNA and starting the LPN program next summer. So far, I'm learning lots of 'how not to' lessons. One NOC nurse likes to give unnecessary tasks that are part of the job but not done like that. Like for example, doing the entire floor of 30 with full vitals on the NOC shift. It's just not done, wakes everyone up and is not needed. They get vitals twice a day anyway and not one other shift does their entire floor. There is one CNA at night and that nonsense puts me at least an hour behind. It's only this one nurse, so I know it's not procedure.

So you can't really tell her no, that's not in my job because it is. But it's not in the job the way it's done. We do have wheelchair wiping as a night chore but lately I haven't gotten to that. And I have no problem saying would you rather I toileted residents or let them be wet while I wipe the chairs. It hasn't been a big deal yet but who knows.

There was one incident a few weeks ago when some big wigs were in town. And it was decreed that NOC would wash ALL the chairs in the building. Now there are 4 of us total and 120 chairs. Who is supposed to be taking care of residents? I don't know if all the chairs ever did get done or not, thankfully I was off on night two of that project.

geoffreyg

Specializes in RN in LTC.

Here is what I really appreciate:

If we are understaffed, and the LPN helps transfer Hoyer transfers - not even do any lifting, just help push the up and down buttons. That is helpful if you can't find another aide.

We have many residents with increased risk for falls, so they have bed/chair alarms. If I can't immediately leave the room I'm in to attend to the alarm, it's great when the LPN makes sure that the resident transfers safely, and either comes to let me know, or attends to their need and gets the alarm back on. It is so helpful when you don't have to drop everything all the time to attend to another alarm.

If the LPN helps me reposition people, or especially scooch them up in bed, that is very helpful.

gg

I couldnt really add anything to the list. I think these are all good suggestions. I do agree the thank you's go along way. It makes you feel that you are a vital member to the team. I once worked in a faucility where I never really heard any thank you's. And the funny thing is that I'm not there anymore,lol. Now I'm always aprreciated by the Staff nurses and Wound Care nurse for turning a resident q2. I really love working with my nurses in LTC. They are always willing to listen even if I'm telling the nurse a resident is throwing up after the 3time of her hearing it,lol. And yes the statement, " When you get time" does go along way.

PsychNurseWannaBe, BSN, RN

Specializes in LTC, Nursing Management, WCC. Has 13 years experience.

Sorry for butting in... But you must totally get them to work for you out of fear! Use an iron fist! OK... completely joking but I bet some of you were ready to kill me. :)

1. Communication and appreciation go a long...long way. I try to empower the CNAs I work with to manage their time and not micromanage them. If I need something I will add...when you have time... or, do you think you can do it with in X amount of minutes.

2. If we have had several bad days and their spirits are down, I buy them pizza for lunch. Yesterday the other RN and I bought donuts for the unit with a big note that said THANK YOU FOR ALL YOU DO!

3. I help with hoyers, transfers, 2 person assists, feed... when I can, which really isn't much and I wish I could do more but can't d/t my own responsibilties. Actually, I have never said no to helping with hoyers and transfers...that only takes a few minutes. The feeding thing takes too long... although I wish I could sit for a bit. :)

4. I plan on buying them some tote bags, pens, and little trinkets from a cool magazine. CNA appreciate week is coming up!! I believe in June.

5. Take the residents down to the dining room as the CNAs get them up.

6. I think the main thing I do is make sure that the CNAs are playing fair with each other. Listen to them if they are coming up to you and saying so and so is not pulling their weight and intervene. They are coming to you for guidance and support. Don't placate... fix it!

7. And as our mothers will always say... please and thank yous go a long way!

mizfradd, CNA

Specializes in med/surg, psych, public health. Has 11 years experience.

i'm a new lpn in ltc. i would like to know what you would like as far as lpn appreciation. i can't give you a raise and i don't make out the assignment. i try never to add extra work, but being new i can't grab alot of call lights yet. i always make sure to sincerely thank my team at night for their hard work. is there any advise you can give that will help this new lpn to keep a team approach the evenings that i work? please keep in mind that i still don't get my meds passed in a timely manner so my time is limited. i will get better at this, but in the mean time....

wow, just print this out and keep it handy to always look back on for when you're older, or having bad times at work, etc., just to remind yourself that you are a thoughtful & caring lpn! :icon_hug:don't ever change that attiude!!

p.s. your comments make me miss my lpn that is being cross-trained at our job & i don't get to work with her everyday anymore (dang, i miss her sooo much) and we were like conjoined twins. :( :bluecry1:

I used to work for a LTC where the LPN's would look for you up and down the halls to tell you your Pt call lights were on. One time my supervisor saw a pt sliding out of a chair, she checked to see who he was assigned to. She came down the hall to find me in another pt's room with my glove hands full of doo- doo, only to tell me the pt was sliding out the chair. I don't think that made any sense whatsoever.

Now that I am in a hospital setting, working as a PCA while going to shool for LPN, there is a huge difference in how the patients are being cared for. Every one answers call lights,:chuckle from CRT, Monitor Techs, EVS even the nurse in charge.

aerorunner80, ADN, BSN, MSN, APRN

Specializes in MSN, FNP-BC. Has 8 years experience.

I've never worked in LTC but the one thing that really helps is when the nurses and I work together on a bed bath. It goes so much faster with two of us which helps free up more of my time and the nurse's time.

I had to ask one LPN to change a bandaid on a man's arm. His room was the very last one on the short wing. The man was dressed and ready to go, except I'd left his arm out of his sleeve for the dressing. LPN waddled down and changed the bandaid after much grumbling. THen waddled ALL the way to the room where I was at that point, the very last room on the farthest hall... to tell me I needed to go put the guys arm in his sleeve. Come on, really? You came all this way to tell me that???

k-t-did

Specializes in OB, OR.

When I come to you to report on a patient, as we are told to do, please don't roll your eyes when I report "mundane" things, like someone needs the podiatrist, or their antibiotic has caused thrush in their mouth. And telling Mrs. Smith that her poop will come out if she just sits there long enough, when she hasn't gone for 3 days.....that is so frustrating. :) Thanks for asking.

I agree with NM nurse to be, treat us like we are people too, and said hello and thank you. I have been a CNA for two years and only work one year as an CNA, because I had gotten very frustrated with the way some LPN and RN would have such nasty attuitudes, which made me not want to be in the profession. I have work in a hospital and nursing home, I had an incident where a patient had diarreha, :banghead:the LPN came out of the room to find me in another patient room changing their diaper. And she asked me to help her take the patient gown off, when I step in the room the patient have feces on the floor the chair all down her leg, just everywhere. After helping the LPN get the patient gown off, she left the room and didn't ask me if I needed help or thank you or if she could reach me something, nothing at all.

That very act made me not want to continue in nursing, but I knew I could not let that stop me because I love helping people. That was a learning experience for me; when I do become an LPN or RN I will know that I should treat people the way I want to be treated. :cry: I find that most people that make good nurses have been CNA. Also, I had an LPN that was very helpful amost to helpful, she was a CNA before she became and LPN, but I can tell you they are very rare. I understand why they say it takes a very special person to be a nurse, because it truly does;:nurse: they have to be special. I feel that lots of people are in this profession for the, and that the wrong reason for being a nurse.

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