Jump to content

New Graduate ER RN vs. Floor Nurse

Emergency   (15,149 Views | 8 Replies)

984 Profile Views; 3 Posts

What does everyone think about new graduate nurses working in the emergency department right out of school?

I am interested in working in the emergency department after graduation, but I am wondering what is the best route to go about this. I know it differs by each person and each hospital, but as nurses who have started out newly graduated in the ER, is it best to learn the ways by being thrown into emergent situations, or do you think it is better to get a feel for the nursing role by working on a general medical floor, etc., to develop a set routine and get used to the flow of things? And also, what do you experienced nurses think about having to work alongside a new graduate nurse in the emergency department? Is it frustrating for you, or do you foster the opportunity to help the new nurses grow and learn?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pixie.RN has 12 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

8 Followers; 32 Articles; 13,353 Posts; 130,357 Profile Views

You will find plenty of threads (and opinions) on this topic in just the first few pages of this forum. IMO, it depends on the ER and the new grad. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

55 Posts; 2,630 Profile Views

You need some experience before working in an er. It is not good for anyone, especially the patient, to have a new grad thrown into an emergent situation, and it will be very unpleasant for you. You need t have the basic patient care skills down pat before you jump in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Esme12 has 40 years experience as a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma.

6 Followers; 4 Articles; 20,908 Posts; 148,360 Profile Views

What does everyone think about new graduate nurses working in the emergency department right out of school?

I am interested in working in the emergency department after graduation, but I am wondering what is the best route to go about this. I know it differs by each person and each hospital, but as nurses who have started out newly graduated in the ER, is it best to learn the ways by being thrown into emergent situations, or do you think it is better to get a feel for the nursing role by working on a general medical floor, etc., to develop a set routine and get used to the flow of things? And also, what do you experienced nurses think about having to work alongside a new graduate nurse in the emergency department? Is it frustrating for you, or do you foster the opportunity to help the new nurses grow and learn?

Welcome to AN! The largest online nursing community!

Being a new grad in the ED is extremely difficult. When you graduate......it isn't just "getting used to" the flow of things..........you have to learn and perfect basic nursing skills, assessment, and procedures. Then move onto advanced skills and assessment. You will need to learn whether it is a Gall bladder attack or a heart attack, hypoglycemia or stroke, drama or real pain, crazy or real. You will have to deal with criminal evidence (rape/assault/murder) and preserving that evidence. Doing this in the fast paced, critical, less than cooperative (the patients) environment is difficult, if not almost impossible at first, and over whelming. Seasoned professionals with critical care backgrounds take a long time to become good and comfortable in the ED.

Finding a facility that will offer you a job is challenging in this job market let alone in a specialty market. A majority of nurses are very happy to help new grads.....IF there is a solid program that allows for the new grad to NOT be counted as a full staff member. The emergency room is an aggressive place. The staff are assertive and do not mince words. "We" can't....we don't have the time to "nurture" and "cuddle" a fragile sensitive individual.....so the ED nurse is viewed as un-cooperative and "mean". But "we" are perfectionists and assertive....you have to be to survive and do it well. Add in the nuts, the drunks, the druggies and the "entitled" and it's a hard place to start your career. You will be on orientation much longer (if done right) than your friends

It is difficult.........But it can be done. Checkout some threads about this very subject.

Good Luck!

New grads in the ED

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CP2013 specializes in ED, trauma.

531 Posts; 9,233 Profile Views

I will be a new grad next year (2013) - Yay can't wait.

I am planning on applying to new grad programs at local hospitals, and the training programs are 12-16 weeks long. Do you think this is an appropriate length of time for new grad training?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Esme12 has 40 years experience as a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma.

6 Followers; 4 Articles; 20,908 Posts; 148,360 Profile Views

The first YEAR is the hardest. Those first weeks will help get you up and running......but it will take a while before you start to "feel" better. Check out this forum. First year after licensure...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

150 Posts; 5,863 Profile Views

My first RN job was in the ER. If you think you want to be an ER RN, then go for it... it's not scary and you'll learn a lot from your orientation and preceptor. My ER is non-trauma with 26 beds. It gets stressful but in time you'll know everyone and get comfortable.

ER isn't for everyone, so choose carefully.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

321 Posts; 7,119 Profile Views

This is an endlessly discussed topic. My opinion is that it depends on the new grad. A motivated, teachable new grad can succeed anywhere, just like a lazy, hard-headed new grad can fail anywhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NurseOnAMotorcycle has 10 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Emergency, CEN.

1 Article; 1,066 Posts; 24,092 Profile Views

Best way to find out is to shadow for a day or two and see if you think you'd like it or not.

And I agree wholeheartedly with brainkandy87'd thought. It's about the attitude.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.