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New grad Nurse quits nursing

Nurses   (1,639 Views | 19 Replies)

lilly-may specializes in New grad nurse.

164 Profile Views; 15 Posts

Hi, I'm a new grad nurse who graduated with a bachelor's in paediatric nursing in sept 19. Throughout nursing school I had my doubts whether nursing was truly for me, I completely dreaded clincials. Never had a huge interest in anatomy and physiology but enough to complete assignments. I'm extremely introverted, not particularly a people person with very high anxiety. Which meant minimal interaction and participation in seminars. So I was also very surprised to make it to graduation, though i was a motivated and keen student nurse. During my clinical rotation I received positive feedback, but as they say you can be the most competent student nurse and still struggle as a new grad.

I applied and started my first new grad job at a general busy paeds unit in Oct 19, lasted 2 months. I extended my oreintation from 3 weeks to the full 2 months i was there because i never felt confident taking on 6 patients independently. I hated it, the clinical enviroment, lack of interest in cases and working independently. The sadness took over me every single shift, even on my days off. Huge anxiety, and depressed days. Note: in my final year of nursing school i had my first stab of depression which was treated and now resolved. Missing all the red flags during nursing school.

I did change my speciality and now i'm 4 weeks into my new grad post at a level 3 NICU. Oreintation is 6 weeks, and truth is nursing is not for me. My interest in A&P is not a lot which is core part to nursing, communication is key and i'm too introverted to even talk to my co workers and patients. Non clinical roles are not possible as a new grad in my region.

I've given nursing 2 attempts now, surely this is enough for me to leave nursing now? I'm 23 and so unhappy. 

I know nursing is a well paid occupation, but my mental health and well being is affected so much. 

I have immense respect for nurses, and enough to know it is not for everyone. Any advice? Anyone know others in the same position. Thanks x

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5 Followers; 37,430 Posts; 100,483 Profile Views

Keep your nursing license either active or inactive should you desire to pursue a new line of work. Obtain career counseling before you embark on a new path. Most importantly insure your health concerns, particularly regarding depression, are well addressed before you make any decisions, whether to change course or stay your present course. Be confident in your self care. You found out early. Too many go through an entire lifetime always wondering about what could be wrong. 

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306 Posts; 71,757 Profile Views

OP, are you open to trying another field in nursing? How about a field that deals with adult patients? Are you willing to relocate?

So far, you had jobs dealing with sick children, which probably included crabby, over-the-top, "Karen" parents.

In some states, after 6 months of nursing experience, you can move on to a non-clinical position.

When you were studying for the NCLEX, was there a particular topic that you found interesting?

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dianah has 45 years experience as a ADN and specializes in Cath Lab/Radiology.

2 Followers; 9 Articles; 2,757 Posts; 68,625 Profile Views

Are you based in the US or across the pond somewhere?

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Rose_Queen has 15 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OR, education.

9 Followers; 4 Articles; 9,276 Posts; 107,793 Profile Views

3 hours ago, dianah said:

Are you based in the US or across the pond somewhere?

Based on spelling of pediatrics and bachelors in a specific specialty, I’m betting U.K.

 

5 hours ago, DTWriter said:

OP, are you open to trying another field in nursing? How about a field that deals with adult patients? Are you willing to relocate?

If OP is in certain countries, they educate to the specialty, so she may have to go back for additional education to move to an adult population.  

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lilly-may specializes in New grad nurse.

15 Posts; 164 Profile Views

23 minutes ago, Rose_Queen said:

Based on spelling of pediatrics and bachelors in a specific specialty, I’m betting U.K.

 

If OP is in certain countries, they educate to the specialty, so she may have to go back for additional education to move to an adult population.  

Yeah that's right, from the UK. I did have an adult rotation during my training which was great clinical exposure. But adult nursing was definitely was not for me. 

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Davey Do has 41 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

17 Followers; 1 Article; 6,693 Posts; 82,889 Profile Views

Lilly-May, I admire your candor and desire to meet this problem head-on.

My advice to you would be to try other areas of nursing. I was laid off from OR as an LPN back in '87, called back and asked if I wanted to work CD. Heck no, I didn't- but hey- it was a job. As it turned out, working CD was one of the greatest experiences of my life.

Here's hoping that you'll find one of the greatest experiences of your life. Good luck, Lilly-May!

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K+MgSO4 has 12 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Surgical, quality,management.

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I see your in the UK and paeds trained.  What about peri-op? Scrub/ scout or anaesthetics nurse.  That way you would only have 1 patient andmultiple people present, caring for the patient. 

Or working with intellectually disabled children?  Often more clinically stable but have higher care needs and technical skills e.g. tube feeds, hoisting to a wheelchair. 

I agree with others, as an introvert with anxiety dealing with parents of sick children would be exhausting for you.

 

Consider the options above or thrown in the towel and find something you are passionate about.  You are only 23. What brings you joy or interest that you could make into a job?  In the moments I consider quitting I say I would love to be a florist but have terrible hayfever!

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TriciaJ has 39 years experience as a RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

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Lilly - if you're hating every minute of your life to the point of becoming ill then do what you have to do.  None of us was born to be a nurse and this isn't something you owe to the world or need to justify to anyone.

I second the advice to make your health a priority and then decide what to do next.  Even if you walk away completely, your education will not be wasted.  It will stand you in good stead in ways you can't predict right now.

Start listening to your gut.  It may feel like a bit of a leap to do so, but it will lead you in the right direction.

Wishing you all the best.

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KalipsoRed21 has 12 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Currently: Home Health.

247 Posts; 4,835 Profile Views

I guess the answer really lies in your financial needs. My first two years of nursing I hated it SO much. Called off as much as the job would allow, cried going to work...terrible. I am 11 years in now. I only still like the 10% of my job where I actually get to deal with nice people that I can help. Most of it sucks. But I can pay my bills, support my husband and kid, and if my employer pisses me off to much I can turn in my notice at the flip of a switch and have reasonable expectations of having another well paying job within a week or two. 
I felt I had no choice but to keep going...I was 47K in debt with no other way to pay it off. Much less think about trying a different career. But if you have enough support to do something different; do it! I think my life would have been better if I had gone into a different field.

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lilly-may specializes in New grad nurse.

15 Posts; 164 Profile Views

On 2/15/2020 at 6:46 AM, TriciaJ said:

Lilly - if you're hating every minute of your life to the point of becoming ill then do what you have to do.  None of us was born to be a nurse and this isn't something you owe to the world or need to justify to anyone.

I second the advice to make your health a priority and then decide what to do next.  Even if you walk away completely, your education will not be wasted.  It will stand you in good stead in ways you can't predict right now.

Start listening to your gut.  It may feel like a bit of a leap to do so, but it will lead you in the right direction.

Wishing you all the best.

I really appreciate this! Especially as it comes from a nurse, with many years of experience and insight. 

It's such an unsettling position to be in, absolutely nervewracking yet you covered almost all the worries I have. Thank you! 

Edited by lilly-may

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lilly-may specializes in New grad nurse.

15 Posts; 164 Profile Views

11 hours ago, KalipsoRed21 said:

I guess the answer really lies in your financial needs. My first two years of nursing I hated it SO much. Called off as much as the job would allow, cried going to work...terrible. I am 11 years in now. I only still like the 10% of my job where I actually get to deal with nice people that I can help. Most of it sucks. But I can pay my bills, support my husband and kid, and if my employer pisses me off to much I can turn in my notice at the flip of a switch and have reasonable expectations of having another well paying job within a week or two. 
I felt I had no choice but to keep going...I was 47K in debt with no other way to pay it off. Much less think about trying a different career. But if you have enough support to do something different; do it! I think my life would have been better if I had gone into a different field.

Hi,

I'm in a decent position to leave financially as i don't have much debt to pay off from university. 

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