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New ER Nurse

Emergency   (4,727 Views 11 Comments)
by NanaRn86 NanaRn86 (New Member) New Member

1,334 Visitors; 13 Posts

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:DHello Everyone

I am a new grad and will be working in the ER in a few weeks. I wanted to know if anyone would like to share any advice or tips. I am a little nervous but can't wait to start. Thanx

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neonatal_nurse specializes in NICU, Nursery.

5,849 Visitors; 201 Posts

I'm not an ER nurse, but according to some of my former classmates who are now in ER, most mistakes are made in medications especially IV. Since ER is a very fast paced setting, you have to always be alert and double-check your meds before giving it to your patients.

Good luck! ;)

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804 Visitors; 5 Posts

Take full advantage of your orientation. Ask lots of questions. Force yourself into situations that you are aprehensive about as this will instill confidence in your ability. Ask lots of questions! Good luck, you'll love it I'm sure. Moe

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1 Article; 2,241 Visitors; 55 Posts

ask lots and lots of questions. don't ever be afraid to ask for help. nurses in the ER work together as a team. that's often the only way to manage a critically ill patient. take advantage of being "new" and volunteer to any and every procedure that comes up. try to find one or two nurses that you are comfortable going to for help. that way when you're on your own, you still have resources that you're able to go to. I loved working in the ER. you're going to have a great time!

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Pixie.RN has 18 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

6 Followers; 32 Articles; 126,639 Visitors; 12,977 Posts

Never be afraid to admit you don't know something, or to ask for clarification if you're uncertain. Good luck!!

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917 Visitors; 4 Posts

I have been in the ER for 2 1/2 years. I started as a new RN grad but had been an LPN 15 years prior to obtaining my RN. The best advice I can give you is to take it all in!! Don't expect to know everything all at once and some of the best advice a seasoned ER nurse gave me was there are 2 things about an ER nurse you have to remember. You are going to mess up and a good nurse will know how to fix it, and the 2nd thing is you are going to fit in or your not. The ER is not for everybody it is very fast paced, team work is imperative and the other nurses have to know you are confident and able to trust you to work with them. When a critical patient comes in everyone falls into there job and time and experience will help you find your way. Take as many classes as you can and ask lots of questions!!! Don't ever be afraid to ask a question or have something clarified. I am still learning everyday and it is a great place to work. Goodluck and best wishes!!

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jmartinrn2000 has 9 years experience and specializes in Emergency, OB.

342 Visitors; 1 Post

I have worked in an ER for 11 years, 9 of it as a RN. It is definitely a fast paced environment, and like previous responses to your post, take it all in. You may be overwhelmed for a long time, but if you adapt to change and like the constant change of pace, you will do fine. I have always worked in ER but have also worked for a few years in OB as well. I like that too but always find my way back home to the ER. You will have your share of great patients and then those that will stay with you for your career. Just ask questions, even if you are unsure. Us seasoned RN's are more happy to have a new grad ask questions than to be overly confident and be embarrassed to ask. Those are the new grads that we "wonder and comment" about. Never be afraid to admit when you don't know something! You will not learn it all overnight. We are all continuously learning!! Take classes and conferences as you can! Obtain your TNCC or TNS if possible! Good luck! Wish you the best!

Jill;)

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Gabriel13 has 8 years experience and specializes in Emergency, home health, urgent care.

1,286 Visitors; 24 Posts

Good luck in your new position. Here are a few pointers:

1. Keep your chin up and have patience with yourself. We all have different learning curves, and things will inevitably take time for your skills and knowledge to develop, so don't beat yourself up.

2. Be ready to stand up for yourself. You will encounter verbal abuse from patients and sometimes doctors and other nurses. Don't let anyone ruin your day.

3. Every shift, focus on at least one thing that went went right or well. You've definitely done something right.

4. Make time during your shift to eat. Don't go 8 or 12 hours without eating. It's extremely unhealthy. Don't always rely on other to relieve you for a break, you just have to stop and take a 5-10 minute time out to eat. I find that keeping small, heathy snacks handy is a good thing. Regular exercise and good diet facilitate optimal mental and emotional health.

5. Consciously check your mind before and during your shift: ask yourself "What's my attitude right now?" You can't control what's going to come at you in any given shift, but you can control your attitude and how you respond to these events. If you have a positive attitude and maintain it, your day will go much better and most patients and staff will respond well to you. If you start your shift miserable or get a bad attitude, your day will suck, nothing will seem to go right.

6. Learn and utilize some good stress management techniques. It's a stressful job by nature, and you must learn to be the calm one in the eye of the storm. When you start to get that panic response to an acutely sick or injured patient, your brain starts to lock up and you get tunnel vision, making you less effective. This will come with time and experience. Eventually, you will be as cool as ice during a cardiac arrest, and you will be at your best.

7. Keep that professional distance. It's important to listen carefully to your patients and try to see things from their point of view. You may feel bad for some of them, but don't get caught up in theie cloud of misery and get depressed.

Ok this post got kinda long, sorry. Hope it helps though!

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LLLLiiiFFEsaveer specializes in Emergency Only.

1,264 Visitors; 62 Posts

Never be afraid to admit you don't know something, or to ask for clarification if you're uncertain. Good luck!!

Thats it, right there! Ask!

You are going to need to do that a lot, for many years...

Confidence too.

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LilgirlRN is a ADN, RN and specializes in ED staff.

8,857 Visitors; 769 Posts

Remember... there are NO stupid questions but many stupid mistakes to be made.

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Jennifer, RN has 11 years experience and specializes in ER, telemetry.

4,428 Visitors; 226 Posts

Seek out people the people that know a lot more than you do, not the ones who pretend to know more. Use your resources for guidance. Don't abuse your techs. If you don't know how to do something, ask someone for help. Eat well, get a good nights rest and enjoy your days off.

ER nursing is one of the most intense, stressful careers a nurse can choose, and orientation can be very hard. Stick with it and it is also one of the most rewarding fields of nursing. GOOD LUCK!!!

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