New to Dialysis

Posted
by jmtm17 jmtm17, BSN (New) New Nurse

Has 1 years experience.

Hi, I’m new to Dialysis as an RN. This is my first RN job. And I’m on my 2nd day of training with a tech/PCT preceptor before training with an RN.

I’m having a hard time with priming, navigating the machine and setup. Plus I work at Davita so they use chairside snappy which makes it even more tough to grasp everything at once. (Since I’m new)

Everyone’s been so nice and informative. But since the work environment is fast paced, I’m always confuse as to which clamps should be open or closed when I set up my supplies before priming. I feel overwhelmed with everything. My preceptor is great but I feel like the training is out place as they try to cover everything all at the same time (Which I totally understand, since they also have to do their job as they train me). 

I was looking for videos on Youtube, but not everyone uses the same machine and they all developed different techniques.

But I’m proud to say that I’m able to recirculate, and remove the setup when Dialysis is finished on my own? Am I behind on my training? It seems like they expect me to master the setup and priming by now. I’ve heard from long time employees that training could be cut shorter to save time and budget LOL. My training is supposed to be 8 to 10 weeks. My FA plans to have me trained with a PCT for 2 wks then 2wks with an RN then I feel like they’ll let me work on the floor on my own after that. Is this normal? Is this how you were trained before? Help. ?

Eileen Meyers

Eileen Meyers, RN

Specializes in "Duncan6" Endocrinology and Dialysis. Has 26 years experience. 10 Posts

Have you had any classroom time? 

4 weeks of training is not enough, in my opinion, to learn everything and be proficient.  In my company, you can't be the solo RN in a clinic for a year.  I can barely remember my initial training (1996), but when I came back 3 years ago after a 10-year absence I had about 8 weeks of travel every week to classes and also did some hands-on at the clinic.  After the classroom work, I still had another month of training.  I thought it was overkill initially, but I felt really prepared when it was done.  2 days is not enough time to be proficient at setting up, priming, navigating, and charting!  

kbrn2002, ADN, RN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Dialysis. Has 20 years experience. 3,703 Posts

That accelerated training timeline would make me think twice about staying honestly. There's no way you should be expected to be functional as a dialysis nurse with 4 weeks training.  At Fresenius even the accelerated training track was a minimum of 10 weeks followed by 6 months of supervised work for an experienced nurse and 12 months of working under supervision for an inexperienced nurse.

The machine stuff will get there, it's confusing but after enough time it becomes muscle memory. No way should you be expected to proficient at it in just a few days or even a few weeks.  I was able to run a 4 patient pod myself by the time I was done with the PCT portion of the training which is expected.

Heck I've been a dialysis nurse for about a year and a half now and while I can of course set up and tear down the machines and put patients on as well as take them off the machines  I'm not as fast at it as the PCT's who do it all the time nor will I ever be. That's OK because while as a nurse you are expected to be able to perform the PCT's job you are not expected to be as fast as they are at it since it's not your primary job. 

DeLana_RN

DeLana_RN, BSN, RN

Has 24 years experience. 819 Posts

On 6/25/2021 at 8:18 AM, Eileen Meyers said:

Have you had any classroom time? 

4 weeks of training is not enough, in my opinion, to learn everything and be proficient.  In my company, you can't be the solo RN in a clinic for a year.  I can barely remember my initial training (1996), but when I came back 3 years ago after a 10-year absence I had about 8 weeks of travel every week to classes and also did some hands-on at the clinic.  After the classroom work, I still had another month of training.  I thought it was overkill initially, but I felt really prepared when it was done.  2 days is not enough time to be proficient at setting up, priming, navigating, and charting!  

How hard was it to return to dialysis after a 10-year break?  I'm asking because I'm considering returning to it after 13 years.  I figure the basic knowledge is still there (I worked 5 years in a clinic and about a year in acutes), but am wondering how hard it will be to relearn the technical aspects of the job.

Thanks!

 

maybaycao

maybaycao, BSN

Specializes in Dialysis. Has 6 years experience. 6 Posts

First RN job with davita since 2016. I was given 3 months of training before I had to be on my own. New RN can be on the floor by themselves but just have to have an experience RN in the building. Focus on one thing at a time. Don’t do everything at once. Just do only priming first week. Take off next week. And so on. If you feel you’re not ready and need more training, then make sure you tell them. I’ve seen many new RN harm pt in some way because Davita juSt sent them off on their own as soon as they’re signed off. Dialysis has a high curve beginning but gets easier as you go on. Good luck and don’t be afraid to ask for help from your tech.

Eileen Meyers

Eileen Meyers, RN

Specializes in "Duncan6" Endocrinology and Dialysis. Has 26 years experience. 10 Posts

@DeLana_RN,BSN.  It really wasn't bad.  More paperwork and regulations, but that's anywhere in nursing.  I felt the orientation period really prepared me well. Machines, cannulation, water room- there are some changes and updates but nothing too hard.  Basic principles still apply, so it's just getting up to speed.  I love being back- hope you do, too!

DeLana_RN

DeLana_RN, BSN, RN

Has 24 years experience. 819 Posts

@Eileen Meyers
Thanks, hearing from someone who's been there gives me hope; much appreciated.

 

CN101

CN101, BSN, RN

Specializes in Dialysis. Has 1 years experience. 196 Posts

I was in the same boat on my second day of training at DaVita. I just hit 4 months about a week ago and I'm pretty much a pro at setting up machines. It takes time! Don't expect to be an expert in just a few days. You'll be fine. 

SmilingBluEyes

Specializes in Specializes in L/D, newborn, GYN, LTC, Dialysis. Has 25 years experience. 20,962 Posts

Oh it takes time and practice. Everyone strings and primes a bit differently. Give it time. I could not string a machine to save my life in the beginning. And I always got air in the system after priming somehow.  How frustrating I remember it being. Now I can do it with my eyes shut. Enough practice got me here.

Be patient with yourself.

integrativenurse

Has 20 years experience. 47 Posts

I was an FA and trainer for newbies and I made sure that our trainees are proficient doing their jobs. Star training goes on for weeks in the classroom before pairing them with PCT preceptors.