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New to current facility, being asked to be team lead...

Management   (2,993 Views | 11 Replies)

jenrninmi has 11 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in L&D.

15,312 Profile Views; 1,974 Posts

I am happy with this, and am excited! I love my current job. I am an infusion nurse at an arthritis clinic. Only just finished my 6th week there. My issue is there has never been a lead RN here. The nurses didn't think it was needed. As it is, the infusion suite works like a well-oiled machine. The facility's administrators are not medical at all. I've never worked in a facility where my manager wasn't a nurse. Weird, right? How do you handle becoming a lead to nurses who don't want change? Also trying to figure out why administration is asking me to fill this new position? I am in school for my MSN in Management/Leadership. Administration knows this. I'm also thinking that because I'm new, I guess They could mold me? I didn't become an employee at this place to go into management here. At least, not this soon. Maybe when I'm finished with school (sometime next year). I feel like if they move me to lead, we may lose some very talented nurses that have been there several years. :(

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

4 Followers; 13,507 Posts; 117,354 Profile Views

Can you decline? Maybe just say you don't feel comfortable being lead after such a short time working there?

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6 Posts; 446 Profile Views

I think that's a slap in the face to the other nurses who have been there longer than you.

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jenrninmi has 11 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in L&D.

1,974 Posts; 15,312 Profile Views

Both comments are the points I was thinking of.

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6 Posts; 446 Profile Views

Maybe ask administration why they decided to ask you, what qualities do they see in you. If they said they asked senior nurses and they declined, then that's a different story. If you decide to accept, be ready for some people to turn on you. And honestly I don't blame them.

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SummerGarden has 12 years experience as a ADN, BSN, RN and specializes in ED, Acute Care, Front-line Management.

3,040 Posts; 36,955 Profile Views

OP: Since your post seems like you lack the confidence and maybe the experience to walk into a place cold turkey and be the one in charge of other nurses, I think it may be best for you to decline the job. As the others have pointed out, the other nurses may push back and management may not be very supportive given that they are non-nurses and probably are not the best judge of character to hire a nurse as a lead nurse.

On the other hand, if you are prepared to walk into a lead position with a strong disciplined personality to learn stuff on the fly and to challenging personalities, then go for it! An education in leadership is a good thing to have, but it does not top work experience, as you will find out quickly when you start to apply for nurse management jobs in the future. Besides, you have to start somewhere, right?

Edited by SummerGarden

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244 Posts; 4,588 Profile Views

Maybe ask administration why they decided to ask you, what qualities do they see in you. If they said they asked senior nurses and they declined, then that's a different story. If you decide to accept, be ready for some people to turn on you. And honestly I don't blame them.

I agree with the first part to ask why they are asking you to take on this role and not someone else...maybe they believe you have the right skill set...being a manager often has very little to do with clinical skill (even though a lot of "seasoned" nurse will tell you otherwise). If this is something you are interested in don't let the fear of others being slighted turn you off. It is possible that no one else wanted it. I would be a little concerned that the others felt they did not need a supervisor...that is a red flag. That would also be a barrier if staff feel as though they have a supervisor that they do not need.

I took on a management role very early in my career and it was the best decision I have made. I wasn't chosen because I had the most seniority...that's a silly way to choose a manager. I would advise you to think long and hard before saying no. If this is a career track you want...ask for an interim role...if it doesn't work out you can step back out of the leadership role. It could be a stepping stone to another job in the future. Good luck!

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jdethman has 6 years experience and specializes in Nephrology.

66 Posts; 2,919 Profile Views

Jump it take charge. You are in school for this, you don't turn it down are you insane.

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icuRNmaggie has 24 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in MICU, SICU, CICU.

1,970 Posts; 25,298 Profile Views

It may not be the well oiled machine that it appears to be. In order to turn around a unit with problems, a middle manager must be hired from

outside. If you have the management skills and knowledge base that this position requires, it is doable.

If not, take a staff nurse position

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38 Posts; 1,359 Profile Views

After 9 years of OR/PeriOperative nursing experience with a lot of "charge nurse" shifts, I took a Team Lead position at a new hospital. I was specifically hired for the TL. It was a position that several of the nurses that had been there a while had tried & not liked, so they decided to hire new meat, ha ha! It has been a great opportunity. The staff wants & needs a strong leader, & I am good at it. It's stressful, & I know why many people DON'T want the job; but coming in from outside was definitely an advantage for me. They immediately respected me for my title & almost 4 years later they still respect me for my leadership & nursing skills. Go for it!

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nursefromcali has 6 years experience and specializes in Ambulatory, Corrections, SNF, LTC, Rehab.

245 Posts; 7,012 Profile Views

It's okay maybe they see a potential to you to lead. I applied as staff nurse in a outpatient department in hospital where I'm working right now but in my interview day, they interview me as the "clinical lead" which is I haven't been and I don't have supervisory experience yet. Luckily I got the job and still working as their clinical lead for almost 2 years now. I'm also leading nurses who became licensed first than me but they still follow me eventhough I'm a brand new nurse when I got the lead position :)

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84 Posts; 1,603 Profile Views

This could be a great way to get started, especially if you are in management school. I wouldn't worry about your peers not liking it, unless they are in management school also.

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