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Never wanna take students again.

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by remotefuse remotefuse (Member)

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Natkat has 8 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in dialysis.

861 Posts; 13,071 Profile Views

Trying to delete this

Edited by Natkat
forgot to quote

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Natkat has 8 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in dialysis.

861 Posts; 13,071 Profile Views

And why aren't the nurses ecstatic to have the students coming to the floor to "help them out all day for free" or even "do their jobs for them."

Reminds me of when I was in nursing school and one of my classmates said "they should be thankful that we are working for them for free." Even as a I student I realized that his attitude was arrogant. We aren't any help to them. If anything, we're in the way half the time. We should be grateful that the hospital was willing to allow us in their facility to learn.

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Natkat has 8 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in dialysis.

861 Posts; 13,071 Profile Views

And thats totally your opinion, may or may not happen.

i can predict with 100% certainty that it will happen. That is not an opinion. That is experience and wisdom.

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

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I personally feel like you overreacted with this entire situation. I hope you remember that you were a student too once (a little more than 9months ago!). Instead of kicking out this student, you could have used this opportunity to educated them on why you want to lift them at the shoulders, or why you wanted the IV running, etc.

Also, what is wrong with a student ("male") nurse that KNOWS everything? I feel like that would show competence. I think you just have a personal vendetta with all students, so you are correct when stating you should NEVER take another student again.

I think you've got this wrong.

None of us have forgotten what it was like to be a student -- even though that was over forty years ago for some. But the students don't understand what it's like to be the RN tasked with teaching a student while carrying a full assignment and, oh yes, still trying to figure out some things for herself.

The OP tried to educate the student; the student wasn't having it. She already knew everything and didn't need to listen to the RN.

The problem with a student nurse who "knows everything" is that it's very difficult to teach anything to someone who is already convinced they know everything. "Knowing everything" does not show competence; it shows arrogance and ignorance which is a very dangerous combination. True competence is understanding that you only know a small fraction of everything that there is to know and being open to education about the rest.

Please think about what you've said. The OP may make a fine preceptor when she's had a bit of seasoning. You, however, sound as though you need some attitude adjustment.

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I genuinely feel for you, we do have people with' lost compassion' and as a student nurse I apologise on behalf of all students!!

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roser13 has 17 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC.

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I personally feel like you overreacted with this entire situation. I hope you remember that you were a student too once (a little more than 9months ago!). Instead of kicking out this student, you could have used this opportunity to educated them on why you want to lift them at the shoulders, or why you wanted the IV running, etc.

Also, what is wrong with a student ("male") nurse that KNOWS everything? I feel like that would show competence. I think you just have a personal vendetta with all students, so you are correct when stating you should NEVER take another student again.

Thanks for identifying yourself as a nursing student, or maybe a pre-nursing student.

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Natkat has 8 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in dialysis.

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please remember you didn't spring from nursing school knowing everything either. You were a student once, and someone took the time to teach you although they were busy and probably annoyed with you as well. Nursing is a very cut throat, judgemental profession. I don't know why everyone is so miserable, but it's very disheartening to be a student, eager to learn and be helpful and not get in the way; and the person chosen to instruct you treats you like a smudge on the bottom of their shoe. I understand some students are ignorant as well, but not everyone is.

i swear, if I see one more post from a student like this.....

look, we've been where you are. You haven't been where we are. There is a shift that happens when you go from being a student to being a nurse. We remember what it's like to be a student. We also remember that we didn't see the whole picture as students. We are coming to you from the future to tell you what it's like, and how you, as a student, can be more respectful and get more from your clinical experience so that maybe, just maybe, nurses would be more willing to work with students. So enough with he whining, do what I tell you, stop talking, and go over there and hand me that dressing kit. Please.

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bag003 has 5 years experience as a BSN.

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I'm failing to still see why this was problematic, maybe he knew all the questions that were being asked of him. Or went above and beyond such as, ill check his labs because this can effect this etc...I guess i'm confused, should he have just pretended he didnt know anything?

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

65 Articles; 13,938 Posts; 170,479 Profile Views

I'm failing to still see why this was problematic, maybe he knew all the questions that were being asked of him. Or went above and beyond such as, ill check his labs because this can effect this etc...I guess i'm confused, should he have just pretended he didnt know anything?

First. Please use the "Quote" button so we know to whom you are replying.

Second. The student in question already felt that he knew all he needed to know and was not listening to the RN with whom he was paired. The RN was trying to educate him on things that he did NOT know. He wasn't listening to her because he was convinced he already knew everything.

The problem is that nobody knows everything. If you're unwilling to admit that you do not, in fact, know everything, you are not open to learning more. The gaps in your knowledge get wider and wider as time goes on.

And it's really irritating to the person who is trying to teach you something.

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bag003 has 5 years experience as a BSN.

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First. Please use the "Quote" button so we know to whom you are replying.

Second. The student in question already felt that he knew all he needed to know and was not listening to the RN with whom he was paired. The RN was trying to educate him on things that he did NOT know. He wasn't listening to her because he was convinced he already knew everything.

.

Ruby, i am failing to see where it stated he refused to admit he was wrong. All it said originally was that he knew everything...and it was painful to talk to him. It's true, mistakes happen when you "think" you know everything and refuse to ask for help.

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NurseStorm has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Mother-Baby and SCN.

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Ruby, i am failing to see where it stated he refused to admit he was wrong. All it said originally was that he knew everything...and it was painful to talk to him. It's true, mistakes happen when you "think" you know everything and refuse to ask for help.

Bag, it is commonly used language that when you say "they knew everything there was to know", that basically they THOUGHT they knew everything there is to know. Since no one (especially a student, but no one in general) knows EVERYTHING, it seems they are using the phrase in this way. It was probably painful to talk to him because he was cocky, arrogant and thinking he knew everything and therefore would not listen to others. The OP can correct me or elaborate on this as she sees fit, but I think most people understand it in this way.

Yes, mistakes definitely happen when you think you know everything and refuse to ask for help. And "mistakes" can be an understatement. Very serious consequences can result from this line of thinking, up to and including death. (ie. Not recognizing septic shock in early stages and have the pt become critical due to lack of knowledge/asking for help, not recognizing heart failure and continuing to give large volumes of IV fluid, etc etc.)

The fact that you think a student "knowing everything" is not "problematic" but that he simply knew everything and probably went above and beyond in looking up labs, makes me concerned for your safety as a student in practice as well. Always learn as much as you can, but never fall into thinking you know everything and shouldn't ask for help! Have fear! If you aren't scared of anything that's when your patients will suffer the most. The students or new nurses with some fear will be concerned when their patient starts deteriorating and end up picking up on these sometimes subtle cues, asking for help, and ultimately recognizing things such as septic shock, CHF, etc, even if they didn't know quite what they are seeing. If you have no fear, you will simply brush off these early signs thinking the patient is "fine" and you are not concerned. Until BAM your patient is circling the drain, and then it may be too little too late. Please, keep these things in mind and read my post above for tips for students.

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airborneinf82 has 8 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Trauma and Cardiovascular ICU.

184 Posts; 3,963 Profile Views

4.8 ccs is enough to cause aspiration pneumonia and kill someone.

Oh dear God please tell me you aren't serious?!?!

The 120cc's in there already wouldn't be a problem, but that 124.8 that is now in there is what pushed it over the edge and now the patient has died from complications of aspiration pneumonia......

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