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Need studing Help!!

LPN/LVN Students   (1,114 Views 8 Comments)
by josinda421 josinda421 (Member) Member

josinda421 specializes in Geriatrics.

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can anyone who's going throught he LPN program tell me how to tackle on these long 60-70pages chapters. I have a quiz monday and exam tuesday. And I've only gotton as far as 3 pages on the first chapter, total is 3 chapters. I know I'm a slower reader, which makes it even worse. But can anyone give insight as to tackle these long chapers with only short periods to study in nursing school. I don't even know where to start, or where to concentrate on.

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i just finished 1st semester of lpn program; my advice is to stay in front of your reading; i tried to read all my chapters b4 lectures; any questions that i had after reading the material i would write on sticky notes and stick to the page and when the instructor covered it in lecture if it wasn't clarified then i would ask the question. textbooks are boring but you just have to keep at it until those pages are read at least once; if you have a break sometimes 20 minutes at a time works

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Josinda421,

Hello I was in an lpn program and I missed graduating because I failed my med/surg rotation by 1 stinking point. That class was the toughest because it required tons of reading and to be honest even if I had read it all I didnt see how I could possibly retain all the info to get a passing grade on the quizzes and tests.

Well, realizing what I did wrong I want to pass this on to you. Those that were successful in my class were the ones who was bringing a tape recorder to class to record lecture. They would listen to the recorded lecture while highlighting their notes they had taken during class. Things that the instructor emphasizes or talks alot about I can guarantee more than likely it will be on the quiz/test.

Also find the time to read the chapter and dont just read but read to retain. You will be amazed how much will come back to you when you are faced with the questions on the test. Lastly treat the syllabus the teacher gave you at the beginning of the class like the bible. What's in the syllabus for that chapter WILL BE on the test. Go through your textbook and highlight everything that is in the syllabus that you need to know about the chapter and read, read, read.

Time management is key and having a comfortable and quiet area to read is important. Dont read in the bed, dont read when you are tired, and take 10-15 minute breaks when you are reading long chapters so you dont get bored and lose focus.

I am an A student now, just by incorporating those few things. Sounds silly and probably things you already know. Just by me sticking to them made the difference for me. I hope this helps you, and good luck you can do it!!!!;)

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cobber specializes in Medical-oncology.

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I'm not an LPN student but I just graduated from an RN BSN program...but I fully understand long reading assignments. nrsn4me had some great suggestions....just to add to that its almost impossible to read every bit of your reading assignments (you'll drive yourself nuts trying). I generally skimmed through the chapters before the lecture and if there was a quiz i would look at the syllabus and look for those topics in the text. Then I would go back after the lecture and read the stuff that I did not understand from the lectures first...then read the rest if you have time. That way you know that you at least understand it all (that way you can think things throug if you have to on a test)...and then using the tape recorder is good way to study...they say that audio retension is better than visual. This is just what worked for me...you may be different, but hang in there, you'll find your groove soon.

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Others have given some good advice, but just to add to it. . . I used to study at the Library. It seemed to be more peaceful than being at home (and I live alone, go figure) Anyhoo, I found this to be helpful because I wouldn't think about the dishes needing to be done or putting a load of clothes in the W/D, etc. Always make sure you take breaks if you find yourself reading and you can't recall what the last sentence was that you just read. If you are not focused you will not retain the info. Good Luck!

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Jules A is a MSN and specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

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All schools are different I'm sure but our exams were largely material from a "test bank". The questions were based more on the text book readings than the lecture notes. I would pay attention in class and take additional notes as they lectured but then pretty much ignore them and focused on studying from the text book. The optional study guides to accompany the text books were awesome also because there was almost always a question or two right from them.

My best tip, not sure if it works for others, is to make my notes cards to study from as I read the chapter. I can't seem to remember what the heck I just read if I read a whole chapter and I didn't have the time to read each chapter, go back and make note cards and then study the note cards. So I just took my notes as I read and then studied them.

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pagandeva2000 is a LPN and specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.

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I would purchase an NCLEX Comprehensive book for PNs. I used Saunders while I was in school. I personally think that Saunders was too intense for studying the boards, but it certainly served it's purpose for school study. It sums up the main points from the textbooks for the most part in less pages. But, you do have to take time to read the text because each book is a bit different, with lab values, etc. Also, if you are going to bargain for points, the evidence will have to be shown from the text, not necessarily other sources.

Time management is certainly the key. Break the chapters down by looking at the syllabus and what was discussed in class, then divide what has to be read by the next exam. By about three or 4 days before the test, then, I used to break out Saunders to go over main points. It worked for me...I did quite well in school. Study time should be basically uninterrupted. Answer the questions at the end of each chapter. Also, if there is a study guide that accompanies the text, purchase it. You'd be surprized...many times, questions are pulled from there.

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164 Posts; 3,532 Profile Views

Pay close attention to the Nursing Interventions with each chapter. Understand what the nurse has to do for each disease process or body system.

For example: Don't knock yourself out memorizing the structure of the skin or the names of all the bones. Obviously, you need a basic understanding of the anatomy, but if you notice, questions on your tests are usually centered around what the nurse would do "if"....

EX: What do you do first? Call the doctor, obtain vital signs, or elevate the head of the bed? Why? Focus on what is important and relevant for the nurse and the actions you would take with each body system and chapter. What stands out about each disease?

Remember your ABC's. Airway, Breathing, Circulation. If you encounter a question and one of the options refers to a person's airway, it will be a priority.

Also, focus on the signs and symptoms with each disease. EX: Congestive Heart Failure (CHF). Left-side or Right-side. How are they different. What are the s/s? What are the priority nursing interventions? What are the most common medications given? How do they work? Does the nurse need to take an apical pulse before giving them? Should the client take the med. on an empty stomach? What teaching would you give for the medication? What are the labs/tests/surgeries that accompany the disease? What does the nurse do Pre and Post Procedure? Is the client NPO before the test? Do they empty their bladder before hand? What complications can arise Post-Procedure? What should the nurse be alert for? What lab values should the nurse watch for?

In a nutshell, avoid trying to memorize the wrong stuff in each chapter. It's just too time consuming!

As others have mentioned, buy a few NCLEX-PN review books and do the practice questions. If you get a question wrong, read the Rationale. Figure out why you got it wrong. The more questions you do, the better off you'll be, because you'll begin to catch on to what type of information to focus on in your chapters.

Hope this helps.

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