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Need help with job offers!!

Home Health   (1,447 Views | 10 Replies)

MotoRN34 has 1 years experience .

975 Profile Views; 24 Posts

So as previously stated, I have been offered a job at a company in a large city. Well just today I have received another offer. Both jobs are similar but the pay is different. So here are some stats: Job1-PPV..SOC-90 ROC-50 D/C-50 SV-35....0.40/mile

Job2-Salaried at 53,645/yr. 0.53/mile. I am paid $25 for anything over 6 points a day (SOC=3 points)

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Avill has 4 years experience as a BSN and specializes in School Nursing, Home Health.

3 Articles; 320 Posts; 7,304 Profile Views

I don't work as a HH nurse full time, but I can tell you that a lot of those nurses are working 9-6 or 7 on some days. Depending if their patient needs them. I think you would get stuck doing paperwork and seeing patients more than needed in a salaried position. Just my opinion, hopefully somebody who works full time will answer. Good luck!

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livelaughlove09 specializes in Hemodialysis.

81 Posts; 2,568 Profile Views

I wouldn't do salary home health unless your agency has an issue with census and referrals. There's a lot more to examine here, what is expected productivity? How far will you be traveling? Are there on call responsibilities? Do you case manage or do you walk in daily and get presented a schedule? What state are you in? How much experience do you have? If you're a go-getter you can write your own paycheck in home health.

That salary is low in my opinion, but it depends on the circumstances.

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5 Followers; 37,445 Posts; 100,541 Profile Views

Like comparing apples to oranges. Try to quantify both to a common denominator. The average number of hours in a work year is set at 2087. Use that as a divisor to come to an hourly rate of pay, then place an hourly average value to each variable to see how things compare. Or, just go with the adage that salaried is of benefit to the employer and choose the PPV job; then make that job work to your advantage by becoming very efficient in the hours you spend per activity.

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OldDude specializes in Pediatrics.

7 Followers; 1 Article; 4,783 Posts; 30,616 Profile Views

"Salaried" is defined as you doing stuff you don't get paid for and at the "provider" level usually works out, after the hours you end up putting in, you'd be better off at Walmart.

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5 Followers; 37,445 Posts; 100,541 Profile Views

"Salaried" is defined as you doing stuff you don't get paid for and at the "provider" level usually works out, after the hours you end up putting in, you'd be better off at Walmart.

When my daughter went from per hour to salaried when she moved up in the supervisory chain, she spent so many "extra" hours at work, either on the phone from home, on the computer from home, or physically going in to the workplace at 2 am on weekends and weekdays alike, that it soon became apparent that her decrease in pay really amounted to quite a demotion indeed. No more differentials, night or weekend, no more overtime pay, and everything else that went with the union aspect of the hourly job title all added up. And to add to all the extra work, the fact that she was a dyed in the wool workaholic who wouldn't leave the job undone, and no wonder she eventually burned out and just plain resigned. She was a perfect example of why one should work hourly, preferably with a timeclock involved, and not salaried.

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MotoRN34 has 1 years experience.

24 Posts; 975 Profile Views

I wouldn't do salary home health unless your agency has an issue with census and referrals. There's a lot more to examine here, what is expected productivity? How far will you be traveling? Are there on call responsibilities? Do you case manage or do you walk in daily and get presented a schedule? What state are you in? How much experience do you have? If you're a go-getter you can write your own paycheck in home health.

That salary is low in my opinion, but it depends on the circumstances.

Great point! Job 1 is 27-30 pts/week Job 2 is 30 pts/wk. I'm a new grad RN in GA and I have a 20 mile radius max. On call was not discussed and I will be a case manager.

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livelaughlove09 specializes in Hemodialysis.

81 Posts; 2,568 Profile Views

I would definitely clarify the on call responsibilities. If you will be case managing I see a future of assessments for you and not many routine visits. Will you be working with an LPN? In that case, and if your agency has a steady census and referral stream, I would not do salary. Salary is usually to the benefit of the employer, and they will always tend to max the salary person out before assigning to PPV nurses. It's just financially advantageous to the employer. People get scared when they see the PPV model, I did, but it worked out very well for me to where I was averaging around $50 an hour.

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KelRN215 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pedi.

1 Article; 7,344 Posts; 68,595 Profile Views

"Salaried" is defined as you doing stuff you don't get paid for and at the "provider" level usually works out, after the hours you end up putting in, you'd be better off at Walmart.

I prefer salaried positions because I find them to be more flexible. True, you don't get OT if you get stuck somewhere until 6 but you can also not start your day until 10 or leave at 4 the next day. I just find it important to set limits. My last 3 positions have been true salaried positions (unlike my "salaried" staff nurse position). Job 1 was 8-4:30, 2 was 9-5:30 and 3 is 8:30-5. I turn my phone off at the time that the answering service/on-call person takes over and don't turn it back on until the next morning. My voicemail clearly states "I am available 8:30-5 and if this is after hours or on weekends or the issue is urgent, call the 24/7 line." At this point in my life/career, flexibility is the most important thing to me. Actually, it's why I chose the job I recently started because I felt that, of all my good prospects, this one was the most flexible. I can arrange my day around doctor/dentist appointments and, if I know I need to leave early for a Friday evening flight, I can schedule my week around that.

As far as the OP's situation goes, that seems like a low salary but maybe it's competitive for a new grad in her area. I think there are pros and cons to both scenarios. Pay per visit can lead to a fair amount of unpaid time, too. You can make out if you have 4 visits in the same neighborhood and can bang all 4 out in 2 hrs but if your patients are spread out or something happens and your visit lasts longer than an hr, you're on the losing side.

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MotoRN34 has 1 years experience.

24 Posts; 975 Profile Views

I prefer salaried positions because I find them to be more flexible. True, you don't get OT if you get stuck somewhere until 6 but you can also not start your day until 10 or leave at 4 the next day. I just find it important to set limits. My last 3 positions have been true salaried positions (unlike my "salaried" staff nurse position). Job 1 was 8-4:30, 2 was 9-5:30 and 3 is 8:30-5. I turn my phone off at the time that the answering service/on-call person takes over and don't turn it back on until the next morning. My voicemail clearly states "I am available 8:30-5 and if this is after hours or on weekends or the issue is urgent, call the 24/7 line." At this point in my life/career, flexibility is the most important thing to me. Actually, it's why I chose the job I recently started because I felt that, of all my good prospects, this one was the most flexible. I can arrange my day around doctor/dentist appointments and, if I know I need to leave early for a Friday evening flight, I can schedule my week around that.

As far as the OP's situation goes, that seems like a low salary but maybe it's competitive for a new grad in her area. I think there are pros and cons to both scenarios. Pay per visit can lead to a fair amount of unpaid time, too. You can make out if you have 4 visits in the same neighborhood and can bang all 4 out in 2 hrs but if your patients are spread out or something happens and your visit lasts longer than an hr, you're on the losing side.

Well things have changed now. I've been offered a salaried job in my hometown city. The PPV job fell through so I will be accepting the salaried position instead.

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OldDude specializes in Pediatrics.

7 Followers; 1 Article; 4,783 Posts; 30,616 Profile Views

Congratulations and good luck!

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