Jump to content

Need Advice

Nurses   (684 Views 6 Comments)
by Michellelove Michellelove (Member)

2,863 Visitors; 30 Posts

advertisement

Hello Everyone,

I need some advice. I applied to my hospital's ER 3 yrs ago and I was interviewed by the manager and she did not hire me, im guessing because at that time it seemed that i was job hopping. I work for a hospital who owns 4 other hospitals and i have worked in 3 of them. I am now currently back at the first hospital and have stayed at my dept for 1.5 yrs however i still really would like to go to ER but she is still the current manager. My question is what should i do. Should i reapply hoping she wont remember me. should i apply and bring up that she interviwed me before and did not hire me or should i stay at my dept longer. Pls help me. thank you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JBudd has 38 years experience as a MSN and works as a ED nurse, community college adjunct faculty.

2 Followers; 1 Article; 35,103 Visitors; 3,703 Posts

Unless she told you point blank that was the reason you weren't hired, you are only speculating. If you want to work there, apply. All that can happen is she says no. Don't bring it up unless she does or there is a pertinent reason. It is likely she will remember the name if not the face.

For all you know, there were more qualified candidates for the job than she needed. Not getting a job on the first try is not to say something was wrong with you, just that they wanted someone else more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been there,done that has 33 years experience and works as a case manager.

4 Followers; 68,684 Visitors; 6,203 Posts

Reapply. All she can do is say no... again.

I reapplied for my dream job, 10 years later. The same manager that did not hire me the first time, did hire me the second time.

I would not bring up the previous interview. It's a whole new day!

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DowntheRiver has 5 years experience and works as a Registered Nurse.

13,570 Visitors; 847 Posts

Like other posters have stated, you should reapply. At the time there may have been a more qualified candidate. I've had this happen to me several times recently, where I applied and had a good interview but I only have 5 years experience and I'm going up against nurses with 20 years experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RNliveoak has 10 years experience.

3 Articles; 883 Visitors; 18 Posts

Hi Michellelove,

Absolutely, I would totally apply again... but I also see two other ways to go about gaining progress on your goal. One is a possible front-end solution. If you have any friends who work in the department you seek that has a good relationship with the manager, you could ask them to inquire directly for you or simply put in a good word on your behalf prior to you submitting your application. This may help in avoiding any negative impressions from memory that she may have from the last time, assuming she has any at all that is. Also, your friend may also help to create a favorable initial impression on your behalf as well.

The other is a back-end solution. If say you did apply and happened to interview again and then got denied the position again, then it is totally within your right to politely inquire as to the reason(s) why you were turned away for the position. If you are willing to move on anyways after the second attempt, then maybe it would be too late to take any feedback at this point for this job; but if you still want it, then its possible there could be something you can work on that is within your control to help your aim with any future attempts thereafter. And, feedback is just good to have as long as you are motivated to receive it and the feedback is truthful and accurate.

I know this is reaching into the future here, but if you do get another interview, and the issue of job-hopping or "commitment" comes up, then that would be your chance to turn perception in your favor by 1) figuring out how to honestly explain the reasons behind your past frequent job switches in a way that sets you up to explain #2, which is: 2) think beforehand the most important, earnest and substantive reasons why you want to be a part of that department, and how (if this is true), once you have obtained the job you have wanted the entire time, your own motivation and commitment will not be an issue while at this new job because of those reasons. The key here is to not come off as desperate. The best way to do this is to really work on developing any good-willed or aspirational reasons for why you want to join and aid her team and really think about those reasons beforehand. And I have to say after this long response that all of this is pretty much my own opinion and I could totally be wrong on all of this stuff. With that being said, I hope you find something in this useful. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
advertisement
  • Recently Browsing 0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×