Jump to content
2019 Nursing Salary Survey Read more... ×

National Nurses United to Back Medicare for All With Week of Action February 9 to 13

Activism   (207 Views 6 Comments)
56 Likes; 5 Followers; 158,845 Visitors; 14,339 Posts
If you find this topic helpful leave a comment.
advertisement

Found at Medscape.com

February 05, 2019

Nurses Union to Back Medicare for All With Week of Action

National Nurses United (NNU) is sponsoring the National Medicare for All Week of Action from February 9 to 13, which will include 130 barnstorms across the country where activists will "learn the ins and outs of organizing our communities" and how to "persuade additional legislators to sign onto the bill," according to an NNU news release....

...The barnstorming events come as Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash) prepares to introduce an "updated version" of a House Medicare for All bill, along with her fellow representatives Keith Ellison (D-Minn) and Debbie Dingell (D-Mich). As many as 70% of Americans support Medicare for All, according to the nurses union.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

please explain to me how Medicare for All will be financially supported.  What are the pros.   I have family that live in Europe where there is social medicine and they have had many problems of not getting care in a timely fashion,  including breast cancer, throat cancer, etc.   If your doctor retires or dies it can take a period of time for you to be covered.  Apparently only certain doctors can even order medications.  If you r not signed up for the system in the right way you cannot even get your medications renewed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are some links:

Medicare for All.Org: Explanation

NPR: Here's What's In Bernie Sanders' 'Medicare For All' Bill

Quote

 

The basics

Sanders' plan is a "single-payer" plan. That means the government will be the "single payer" on any health expenses. Right now, there are lots and lots of payers in the U.S. health care system — insurance companies, the federal government, states and so on.

"Medicare for All"? Not quite. Sanders calls his plan "Medicare for All," but that's more of a handy slogan than reality, as this plan would greatly expand Medicare and overhaul it — for example, it would greatly expand the type of coverage offered and also eliminate deductibles, copays and premiums. Private insurance companies are also currently a part of the Medicare system. That wouldn't be the case under Sanders' plan.

Phased in over time. The Sanders plan wouldn't extend insurance to all Americans immediately; rather, it would do it over four years (and would, as stated above, greatly change the program). The first year, the Medicare eligibility age would be lowered to 55. That would move to 45 and then to 35 over the following two years, until finally, in the fourth year, everyone would be covered.

Covers all sorts of things. Sanders proposes generous coverage that goes well beyond what Medicare currently covers, and even well beyond what many people's private insurance plans cover. His plan would cover dental and vision care, for example, which are, for the most part, not covered by Medicare.

Payment is unclear. A generous plan that covers all Americans is going to require more revenue. There's no exact plan for how to pay for Sanders' bill, but he did on Wednesday afternoon release a list of potential payment options. Among the proposals: a 7.5 percent payroll tax on employers, a 4 percent individual income tax and an array of taxes on wealthier Americans, as well as corporations

 

Slate: What Do Democrats Actually Mean By Medicare For All?

NPR: Several Democrats Eyeing A Presidential Run Embrace 'Medicare-For-All'

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Medicare For All | National Nurses United

Quote

The Expanded and Improved Medicare for All Act — H.R. 676 in the House and S. 1804 in the Senate — would change all of that. It would expand our current Medicare system to provide high-quality, comprehensive health care to everyone!

COVERS EVERYBODY

Each of us gets the health care we need through a single-payer health care system that guarantees health care for every person.

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

Medicare for All covers all medically necessary care, including: medical, vision, dental, hearing, and reproductive care. It’s one comprehensive plan with freedom to choose your provider and no more networks restricting your care.

SAVES MONEY

Medicare for All pays for all covered health care services and therefore has the power to eliminate waste and control all of the costs. Nearly all individuals and businesses would save on health care with no more copays, deductibles, or surprise medical bills.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Medical Bankruptcy: Still Common Despite the Affordable Care Act

Myriad anecdotes—of a Nobel laureate who sold his medal to pay medical bills,1 or the more than 250 000 GoFundMe medical campaigns last year2 —attest to the financial toll of illness on American families. National surveys confirm that medical bills frequently cause financial hardship,3 and the US Consumer Financial Protection Bureau reported that they were by far the most common cause of unpaid bills...

...   Medical bankruptcy has garnered public attention because it resonates with the abuse that Americans—including many middle-class Americans— suffer at the hands of our health care finance system. Despite gains in coverage and access to care from the ACA, our findings suggest that it did not change the proportion of bankruptcies with medical causes. That’s not surprising because the chronically poor— the group most affected by the ACA’s coverage expansion— have reduced access to credit, have few assets (such as a home) to protect, and face particular difficulty in securing the legal help needed to navigate formal bankruptcy proceedings. Moreover, medical costs continue to outpace incomes, 29 million remain uninsured, and many of those with health insurance face unpredictable and unaffordable out-of-pocket costs as copayments and deductibles ratchet up. And few Americans have adequate disability coverage, leaving them vulnerable to illness-related income loss that amplifies the financial distress caused by medical bills. Rather than acting to make health care more affordable, the current administration seems intent on further hollowing out coverage: encouraging a migration to bare-bones, short term insurance policies that leave enrollees largely unprotected; allowing states to impose Medicaid work requirements that threaten to swell the ranks of the uninsured; and joining a suit that would end enforcement of the ACA’s preexisting condition coverage mandate. The results of the midterm election—in which health care was the most prominent issue—stand as a rebuke to these retrograde steps. Instead, policymakers should move forward from the ACA and implement programs that guarantee coverage that is not just universal but also comprehensive, as well as sick leave and disability coverage that replaces income during illness. Although death is inevitable, good public policy can ensure that financial suffering from illness is not...

https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/pdf/10.2105/AJPH.2018.304901 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More information and opinion. I quoted a fraction of the information needed to begin understanding single payer healthcare. 

Quote

 

Proposal of the Physicians' Working Group for Single-Payer National Health Insurance

U.S. health care is rich in resources. Hospitals and sophisticated equipment abound; even many rural areas boast well-equipped facilities. Most physicians and nurses are superbly trained; dedication to patients the norm. Our research output is prodigious. And we fund health care far more generously than any other nation.

Yet despite medical abundance, care is too often meager because of the irrationality of the present health care system. Over 39 million Americans have no health insurance whatsoever, including 33% of Hispanics, 21% of African-Americans and Asians, and 11% of non-Hispanic Whites. Many more - perhaps most of us - are underinsured. The world’s richest health care system is unable to assure such basics as prenatal care and immunizations, and we trail most of the developed world on such indicators as infant mortality and life expectancy. Even the well-insured may find care compromised when HMOs deny them expensive medications and therapies. For patients, fear of financial ruin often amplifies the misfortune of illness...

It is time to change fundamentally the trajectory of America’s health care - to develop a comprehensive National Health Insurance (NHI) program for the United States.

Four principles shape our vision of reform.

Access to comprehensive health care is a human right. It is the responsibility of society, through its government, to assure this right. Coverage should not be tied to employment. Private insurance firms’ past record disqualifies them from a central role in managing health care.

The right to choose and change one’s physician is fundamental to patient autonomy. Patients should be free to seek care from any licensed health care professional.

Pursuit of corporate profit and personal fortune have no place in caregiving and they create enormous waste. The U.S. already spends enough to provide comprehensive health care to all Americans with no increase in total costs. However, the vast health care resources now squandered on bureaucracy (mostly due to efforts to divert costs to other payers or onto patients themselves), profits, marketing, and useless or even harmful medical interventions must be shifted to needed care.

In a democracy, the public should set overall health policies. Personal medical decisions must be made by patients with their caregivers, not by corporate or government bureaucrats.

We envision a national health insurance program (NHI) that builds upon the strengths of the current Medicare system. Coverage would be extended to all age groups, and expanded to include prescription medications and long term care. Payment mechanisms would be structured to improve efficiency and assure prompt reimbursement, while reducing bureaucracy and cost shifting. Health planning would be enhanced to improve the availability of resources and minimize wasteful duplication. Finally, investor-owned facilities would be phased out. In each section we present a key feature of the proposal followed by the rationale for our approach...

http://www.pnhp.org/publications/proposal_of_the_physicians_working_group_for_singlepayer_national_health_insurance.php?page=all

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
advertisement
×