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My I'm going to medical school

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by synaptic synaptic (Member)

synaptic has 5 years experience .

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You are reading page 5 of My I'm going to medical school. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

nurseactivist has 40 years experience and specializes in Med-Surg, OB, ICU, Public Health Nursing.

247 Posts; 12,494 Profile Views

Can't respond to someone who has so little respect for the English language. Learning to write before pursuing any career should be #1 on the list.

Edited by nurseactivist

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14,620 Posts; 103,246 Profile Views

The day will come when I will wear with pride the badge that says, "José Quiñones, RN, BSN, MD."

I doubt that v. much. I've known plenty of physicians who started out as RNs, but none of them volunteered that info other than to close friends. I've never seen a physician with a hospital-provided badge that said anything about any prior occupation/role other than "MD" (although plenty of them have other backgrounds). Just as RN's badges don't say anything about how they were a CNA, LPN, RRT, whatever, prior to becoming an RN. I guess you might choose to wear some kind of personal "RN" pin or badge to identify that you are (were) a nurse, but expect your work setting (outside of your own private practice) to have a problem with that.

Becoming a physician isn't about becoming a nurse with more, better credentials. It's about leaving nursing and entering another discipline.

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1,855 Posts; 12,908 Profile Views

Can't respond to someone who has so little respect for the English language. Learning to write before persuing any career should be #1 on the list.

I think you meant "pursuing".

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JoseQuinones has 5 years experience.

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8:12 pm by elkpark I doubt that v. much. I've known plenty of physicians who started out as RNs, but none of them volunteered that info other than to close friends.

All due respect, elkpark, but I will. I think both sides of medicine are hugely important, both the nursing and the doctor side. We all need each other. Perhaps I won't run around on the floor with that badge, but in my public life I will. Heck, I'll put it on the jackets of my books too (supposing I write books, but you get my drift).

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8,863 Posts; 46,558 Profile Views

Your "quality of care" does. Working an 8 hrs a day doesnt make me or anyone else less of a provider. If I have to work more hours at my practice to educate a patient on their acute or chronic disease or when their managing severe symptoms e.g. stroke, heart attack until ambulance reaches them then I will. I have always done so. Which provider will not? I could never sleep well if I did not give it my all. But also when you add the 6 or more hours of charting/reviewing new labs you have to do at night and the follow up calls to patients you have to do in the morning as well signing heaps of paperwork...then how much extra work is needed?

Are you working 6 extra hours a week to finish your work? I hope you get paid for that time. I work several jobs and there is rarely a time when I am not able to get my work finished during the shift. My staff handles patient phone calls. It is my opinion that if I am not able to assess, diagnose and prescribe in the expected time frame I'm not doing something efficient and I need to make changes.

Perhaps I'm misreading your and others' points but it seems like we are back to the self-serving thought that spending more time with a patient and having them "like me" equates to competent care and I'd disagree.

Could we just agree NPs are midlevel providers and stop protesting that label? We truly can't have it both ways.

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nurseactivist has 40 years experience and specializes in Med-Surg, OB, ICU, Public Health Nursing.

247 Posts; 12,494 Profile Views

I googled and didn't correct the spelling, just read the definition. thanks, editor

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anayo specializes in NH,SNF, ICU, ER, Geriatrics.

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Are you working 6 extra hours a week to finish your work? I hope you get paid for that time. I work several jobs and there is rarely a time when I am not able to get my work finished during the shift. My staff handles patient phone calls. It is my opinion that if I am not able to assess, diagnose and prescribe in the expected time frame I'm not doing something efficient and I need to make changes.

Perhaps I'm misreading your and others' points but it seems like we are back to the self-serving thought that spending more time with a patient and having them "like me" equates to competent care and I'd disagree.

Could we just agree NPs are midlevel providers and stop protesting that label? We truly can't have it both ways.

I dont get it fellow collegue. I know I am a midlevel. Ive said that before. Ive also said that NPs need to know their scope/boundaries as well. But MDs should respect NPs or any other midlevel too.(Not take advantage of them). Im not trying to be an MD. But being MD doesn't make you a "signifcant power" Every health professional needs to work together. Thats what I said before. I am happy being a midlevel. But hey, there are others who are not and want to MDs. Nothing wrong with that. Is it wrong to deliver good care and patients liking you? If youre not in this health profession do so then what are you here for? I know if you had an a-hole PCP you would fire him or her. If its about making lots money then that varies from state, county, or job in your current practice. And no its not all time I do 6 hours extra but you just said NPs arent willing to working hard enough according to docs. Maybe I am misunderstanding you. Does owning multiple practices + making lots of money + not seeing your patients + not being reliable make a good MD for some anyways? Even my own friend whose an MD says, " Those patients are like your family. Treat them like your dad, mom, sister, brother...."

Edited by anayo

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BostonFNP specializes in Adult Internal Medicine, Hospitalist.

3 Articles; 5,223 Posts; 54,450 Profile Views

Could we just agree NPs are midlevel providers and stop protesting that label? We truly can't have it both ways.

Maybe you are a "midlevel" to someone, but the vast majority of NPs are not. Most function independently even in the states that require collaboration agreements. Those agreements have one purpose: to ensure physicians remain in control of the revenue stream. If it were for any other reason an experienced NP could be the supervising provider for a novice NP.

You argue that you won't "do any tasks that a physician wouldn't do" and demand equal pay but then spout this kind of nonsense about NPs as "midlevels". You are right, you can't have it both ways.

I care for a large panel of medically complex patients fully independently in a state that requires a collaboration agreement. My collaborator is my business partner and treats me as such. We do the same job and see the same number of patients on days we work; he works 3 days a week the rest of the time I am alone both inpatient and in clinic. I am similar to the vast majority of my colleagues, most of which make 15-25% less per patient in reimbursement and 25-50% less in salary than their "collaborating" physicians.

Edited by BostonFNP

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You're also incredibly intelligent and a fantastic Nurse who puts her patients first and makes a major difference. I've no doubt you'll be an even better NP.

Heya, toots. Thank you. Been thinking about you!

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2 Articles; 2,806 Posts; 41,029 Profile Views

I also do not understand all of your post. MD vs NP vs PA is all a personal choice. Could I have done medical school? Sure. I just didn't want to go that route. Does that make me wrong? No.

Much luck in your endeavors. I really hope there was a good reason for your (lack of) proper grammar.

You think he needs to take an IQ test first?

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FolksBtrippin is a BSN, RN and specializes in Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Public Health.

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Interesting points have been brought up about "appliance nurses" (new term for me, love it) and nurse practitioners wanting to not work as hard as MDs.

That is because nursing is a pink collar profession, which means nursing is/was a profession of mostly women. Traditionally women are/were the primary caretakers of the home and children, which means we need our work to be flexible, accommodating and not all-encompassing.

As gender roles evolve, we are learning that both sexes need flexibility at work, both sexes need time caring for the family and home; and time contributing to society (that's what nurses do). If we want to still have physicians in the US, (we are running out of them, grabbing them from foreign countries and getting desperate) we will need to change the schooling requirements to fit the needs of the millenial and boomlet generation. This generation does not have sex roles that allow the continuation of the med student who works 80 hours for 7 years for little pay. The contemporary med student does not have a wife who is taking care of everything else, pouring her whole self into the well being of her doctor husband while he lives at the hospital. Nope. Not happening.

The Nurse Practitioner path is doable. Not only that, NPs have similar outcomes to MDs. NP is the future. Not saying there isn't room for improvement. Of course there is. But the idea that NPs are going to become extinct? Not in my lifetime.

Physicians could become extinct. I don't think it will happen, but I think it might if we don't grow with the times. We need to realize that with the internet, the wealth of constant information, we simply do not have to school physicians the way we used to. We can relax a little. And that's a lucky thing.

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8,863 Posts; 46,558 Profile Views

You argue that you won't "do any tasks that a physician wouldn't do" and demand equal pay but then spout this kind of nonsense about NPs as "midlevels". You are right, you can't have it both ways.

Actually that was meant to be tongue in cheek for those saying they don't need to work as hard as a physician because their patients get so more attention and holistic care. The point I was attempting to make all along was that if we want to be considered on par with physicians we need to function as they do.

I'm in an independent state so no collaborator needed here but sadly no my pay is not equal to what the psychiatrists bring in.

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