MSN vs DNP

Posted
by Julius Seizure Julius Seizure Member Nurse

Specializes in Pediatric Critical Care.

Do you think that with more and more programs becoming DNP programs, that its going to become like the LPN vs RN, or ADN vs BSN, where its tougher to find a job if you are a BSN RN. Do you think that to get hired you will have to agree to get your DNP within 2 years? Is starting a MSN program now still the smart way to go?

Anonymous1257

Anonymous1257

145 Posts

I think it'll be unlikely that companies will start requiring MSN prepared APRNs to go back and get their DNP. A few big reasons I can think of off the top of my head are...

1) a DNP won't be able to bill for a single cent more than an MSN, so there's no financial incentive for businesses

2) there is no data to support that DNPs are safer than MSN APRNs, but there IS lots of data (or so I've been led to believe) supporting efficacy of BSN prepared RNs compared to ADNs, hence the push in that area

3) there are currently no government incentives, like "magnet status," that involve the DNP

llg

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 45 years experience. 13,469 Posts

I don't think any major changes are coming soon ... but ... in the long run, the people with more education will be at an advantage for certain types of jobs. That has been the historical trend in a wide variety of careers, not just nursing. To think that nursing will not follow that same common societal path with respect to the DNP is a little disingenuous.

Exactly how it will play out is anybody's guess -- and it will probably vary by geographic region and specialty. So it comes down to the specific conditions of your personal situation. For example:

1. How many career years do you have left?

2. Do you live in a region with lots of DNP programs?

3. Do you live in a region that has historically been "early adopters" of new programs of education, certification, etc.? How has your region handled the whole ADN/BSN issue? Graduate degrees for managers, staff development, etc.? Has your region been quick to increase the educational requirements for other nursing career paths? Or have they been slow?

4. What are your specific career hopes? Do you plan to get a job in a clinic and spend the rest of your career in that one place -- and is that a reasonable plan for your area? Or do you anticipate that you may find yourself in the job market a couple of times in your future career?

5. How likely is it that you will move to another region?

Etc. etc. etc. I believe that at this point, your decision should take your personal situation into account as the major factor -- more so than the national trends. Those national trends will take years to play out and there is likely to be a lot of variation for a significant period of time.

juan de la cruz, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care, General Cardiology. Has 30 years experience. 9 Articles; 4,338 Posts

The current status of the DNP transition still makes it very reasonable to pursue the Master's degree. Just look at the latest survey results released by AACN (AACN, 2014). I think the meat in this survey is all in table 3.1 of the full text which surveyed 408 APRN program offerings including those that are online in 2014 and summarizes as:

BSN to MSN only programs: 284 (69.6%)

Combination of BSN to MSN and BSN to DNP programs: 81 (19.9%)

BSN to DNP only programs: 43 (10.5%)

There are certainly schools labelled as "enthusiastic early adopters" of the DNP only option but they are still small compared to the total number of programs. Even adding the "cautious adopters" schools to the mix that offer both MSN and DNP options as entry level APRN programs do not make a majority. The bulk of the current APRN offerings are still in schools labelled as "traditionalists" with MSN only options.

NJprisonrn

NJprisonrn

195 Posts

My personal feeling is that I worked quite a bit to get my MSN. I'd like to focus on building my professional and clinical skills. In the future I may pursue DNP, but I think it would cheapen the experience to rush through to get it now just because. I have had no trouble finding a job. I see no reason to add to my current student loan debt. As a young provider, I have a lot to learn and many years to practice. I think I have plenty of time to pursue the terminal degree when I am more established.

sauce

sauce

178 Posts

well if dnp was free or lead to a good amount of more money id do it. but it doesn't seem either of those are available so.

babyNP.

babyNP., APRN

Specializes in NICU. Has 14 years experience. 1,920 Posts

I got my MSN because my school that I wanted to go to did not offer a DNP. But it turned out to be a good choice for me. I'm working as a new NP now and because my employer will give me a couple of thousand in tuition benefits, I'm planning on taking one class a semester and will just complete it slowly over the next few years. Since I have a 30+ year career ahead of me, I definitely want to do it, but not at the expense of burning myself out from school and starting a new career.

ericseitz

ericseitz

Specializes in Harm Reduction/Public Health. Has 1 years experience. 59 Posts

The University of Washington is one of those "early adopters", and all their NP/CNS/CNM degrees are all DNPs now. The only programs that we have that are masters level now are an MSN in community health nursing and nursing informatics. I am still dubious about this move, but it is definitely trying to align with the recommendations from the 2010 IOM report, creating degree parity, leadership skills, and practice inquiry. Makes sense, but its a bold move.

allennp

allennp

Has 25 years experience. 103 Posts

I would if I was young..less than 50? and starting a program, just seems to make sense though I agree with all the above posts.

Doesn't though the university of Washington allow a person to obtain a MSN mid school track? And exit if they wish? I seem to recall someone one doing that.

ericseitz

ericseitz

Specializes in Harm Reduction/Public Health. Has 1 years experience. 59 Posts

That may be correct, although the curriculum starts with all the DNP-based classes, which are all non-track specific class where all DNPs take classes together, regardless of track. Second and third year are track-specific years.

sheyjay

sheyjay

18 Posts

Doesn't though the university of Washington allow a person to obtain a MSN mid school track? And exit if they wish? I seem to recall someone one doing that.

Only those who were in the previous 1.0 curriculum can get a Masters in Passing. Those who are in the new 2.0 curriculum no longer have that option anymore.