Jump to content

MRSA: why hx of MRSA must be documented in the pt's chart?

Nurses   (11,703 Views | 13 Replies)

3,937 Profile Views; 92 Posts

Hi,

I heard that MRSA must be documented int pt's chart if he/she has a hx of MRSA. I am curious why they do that? Does MRSA develop immunity to the infection?

Thanks,

STUDENT NURSE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

whichone'spink has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN.

1,473 Posts; 24,958 Profile Views

MRSA must be documented in the chart because for one thing, it establishes that the patient has a resistant infection and also because it alerts people to the fact that the patient needs to be on isolation precautions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

psu_213 has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Emergency, Telemetry, Transplant.

3,869 Posts; 28,237 Profile Views

Basically all medical hx should be documented. This is not done because of some hospital policy, this is done for the good of the patient. If the pt. has a hx of pnemonia (or any other infection), that is charted even if it was years ago and is not a current problem.

I am little confused as to what "develop immunity to the infection" means, and I am not sure if previous MRSA infection puts someone at risk for future MRSA infections.

Either way, what is the 'problem' with charting it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AgentBeast has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Cardiology and ER Nursing.

1,971 Posts; 21,926 Profile Views

Patients with a history of MRSA infection are more likely to be colonized by MRSA. So the history is documented the patient is usually placed on isolation precautions and MRSA is either ruled in or ruled out whether or not there is an active infection. The exact policy and procedures are determined by the facility.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

200 Posts; 3,895 Profile Views

I don't think the OP understands what MRSA is Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. It is a bacterial infection highly resistant to certain antibiotics. It is important to know this information, not only for the patient's treatment, but for those taking care of these patients.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LouisVRN is a RN and specializes in Med/Surg.

672 Posts; 9,467 Profile Views

MRSA like any staph infection can colonize a person and live on their skin, in their nasal membranes, etc without causing any signs of an infection. Thus even if a person is colonized with MRSA and doesn't have an active infection the person can still spread MRSA to another pt which may or may not develop an active infection as a result.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

690 Posts; 15,037 Profile Views

Having MRSA once does not make you immune to getting it again, quite the opposite actually. A friend of mine got an infected wound, turned out to be MRSA. Now she has random flare ups of the infection, she definitely should be put on isolation anytime she goes to the hospital.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ladycody has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in CWON.

31 Posts; 1,852 Profile Views

MRSA can lurk in certain areas without presenting symptoms...such as the nares. While non-symptomatic MRSA can be found in anyone...it is more commonly found in those who have had a previous active MRSA infection. Hence...knowing that someone has had an active MRSA infection in the past allows the facility to take extra precautions in patient care (and tests are run in many instances) to help prevent the inadvertant spread of MRSA during the patient's hospital stay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ladycody has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in CWON.

31 Posts; 1,852 Profile Views

duplicate post deleted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Biffbradford specializes in ICU.

1,097 Posts; 10,289 Profile Views

If you have worked in a hospital, then you have been colonized. :eek: Indeed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

loriangel14 is a RN and specializes in Acute Care, Rehab, Palliative.

1 Follower; 6,923 Posts; 36,895 Profile Views

We document for the reasons given about plus the patient gets flagged so that if they are ever readmitted they are put in isolation until they are swabbed and test negative for MRSA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

roser13 has 17 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC.

6,504 Posts; 51,564 Profile Views

"Does MRSA develop immunity to the infection?"

No, MRSA is not a viral infection (against which immunity may develop). It is a bacterial infection that must be monitored for recolonization even after antibiotic treatment. Some facilities actually take the position of "once a MRSA, always a MRSA" and always treat flagged MRSA patients as potentially contagious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.