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Moving just as training is ending.

Career   (205 Views 6 Comments)
by LPN2RNBoom LPN2RNBoom (New Member) New Member

254 Visitors; 4 Posts

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I need advice please.  This is not going to win me friends but it's all that I can do and I'm sorry.  I was hired for my dream job just after passing my NCLEX and I just started.    However, my husband is now deciding that he wants to retire now and he has decided he wants us to move south.  I am okay with this but the timing is horrible.  The time frame that our lease is up is also the time my training would end.  Is there a point to even giving two week notice if I will still be training?  What do I do?  I don't want to burn bridges but at the same time, if I'm still training what use is there in giving 2 weeks notice?  I didn't realize that my husband wanted to retire that soon. Don't hate me :(  TIA

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dream'n has 25 years experience and works as a RN.

14,414 Visitors; 1,016 Posts

The professional thing to do is to let them know immediately. That way they can hire another nurse for the position and not pay to train you for a job that you won't be doing.  

I do find it a bit disconcerting that your husband suddenly decided that he is retiring and that the two of you are moving without having consulted long and hard with you.

And why would anyone hate you?  

Edited by dream'n

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RNperdiem has 14 years experience.

1 Follower; 29,120 Visitors; 4,139 Posts

Traditionally the man decided to move for the work and the woman followed him. The women were expected to make the sacrifices because the men were the breadwinners.  I still see this on this board often enough. A new nurse lands a dream job, and all of a sudden, the husband/fiancee/boyfriend decides to move. Sometimes I wonder if this is some kind of sabotage.

You can push back. You will be the one earning money and he will be the retiree. Tell him that moving is not something to be rushed into, and while he is scouting locations and making plans and dealing with the millions of pieces of details that go with this over the next year or so, you will be gaining valuable work experience and earning some money.

Stand up for your best interest. Fight for your career.

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN and works as a Asst Community Manager @ allnurses.

15 Followers; 134 Articles; 186,528 Visitors; 20,710 Posts

Moved to career forum. 

I wanted to add that my husband retires in <2 months (yeah!) and yes he would like to move to somewhere warm and sunny. However, our family is here and I have a wonderful job with great benefits so we discussed it throughout the years (retirement is not usually a surprize) and have decided that we are just going to vacation somewhere warm....maybe talk with your husband about holding off on moving?

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NICU Guy has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a NICU RN.

1 Follower; 31,061 Visitors; 3,285 Posts

Tell him that moving is going to be delayed until you get your 2 yrs experience. He can find a hobby that can occupy his time for the next 2 yrs. He can also plan out where he would like to move to.

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llg has 40 years experience as a PhD, RN and works as a Nursing Professional Development + Academic Facult.

5 Followers; 57,827 Visitors; 13,015 Posts

I think you have gotten some good responses to your question.   If this job is important to you, then tell your husband that you need to delay moving (whether he chooses to retire now or not).   If you want to move ... then move.  

But what you should NOT do is take the paid training from your current employer and then leave immediately -- without having worked long enough for them to feel you have been worth their investment.   If you are going to move, tell them right away, apologize, and stop taking their money and training under false pretenses.   I think you know that such a course of action would be morally wrong on your part.

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