Jump to content

Mothers: How hard was nursing school with kids?

First Year   (16,725 Views 10 Comments)
by christina94 christina94 (New) New

789 Profile Views; 2 Posts

I am still in the process of finishing my Bachelor's degree. I decided well into it that I wanted to do nursing so for the next year I'll just be doing a&p, microbiology, chem, etc to finish up my credits for my bachelors. After that I'd like to get into an accelerated program.. I was looking at a few schools like Pace University, NYU, CUNY Lehman, CUNY Hunter, Concordia... all of these programs are 12-15 months.

But... I'm the mother of two toddlers.. My husband has a demanding job so I already do not get a lot of time to study and do school work. How difficult is nursing school for mothers of young children? Should I just enroll in a regular nursing program which takes two years plus the next semester or so completing prerequisites, or should I take the plunge and try an accelerated program?

I have always done very well in school but I get stressed out very easily.. and all this is just even more stressful! Mommies who went through nursing school please share your experience!

Christina

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

15 Posts; 833 Profile Views

I completed at a 4 semester BSN program (fall, spring, fall, spring). I had two children ages 1 year and 3 years when I began the program. It was challenging at times to complete everything for tests, papers, and clinicals. At the time, my husband was working 40-45 hours per week during normal business hours. He was the one who did most of the pickups and dropoffs for childcare. I also have family in the area who could fill in for childcare if needed. You will definitely need to figure out the logistics of childcare and clinicals (which can go from 0630 to 1915 on day shift).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RaineyRN specializes in Nurse Educator, Culturally Sensitive Nsg.

59 Posts; 2,653 Profile Views

Child care was definately my issue as well!! I did my traditional BSN with my hubby working out of state most of the last 2.5 years. I have two boys, 2 and 7 when I started my last stretch at the University level.

I'd say do the traditional program. The other is just toooooooo intense from what I've seen, and you don't get as much wiggle room if you have sick babies, etc... Also, check with your schools' programs for any sick childcare assistance. The UofArizona had arrangements to subsidize childcare with an agency in case of illness. I only had to pay $3/hour instead of $18 for a sick kiddo that couldn't go to daycare.

As far as childcare goes, line up a couple of emergency sitters just in case... clinicals are the most difficult. 12 hours at a stretch, but that doesn't mean that's all you will be there for... sometimes it takes a while to wrap up and give report, and you end up being out for 14+ hours.

And finally... whatever you decide... know that being a mom gives you a HUGE hand up over a lot of the little kids you will be in school with. You already know how to multitask, be a grownup, and be responsible. Many of them don't. Your experiences with children and childbirth will help!

Also, remember that many of your instructors are parents too.... let them know early on that you have little ones, and are concerned about having to miss time because of them... and never, ever, ever take advantage.

It's definately Dooable!!! Go for it mama!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MissM.RN has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN.

165 Posts; 7,730 Profile Views

Hi Christina,

I'm in an ABSN program now, and even without kids I wish I had completed the traditional pace BSN. Every school is different, especially your area in terms of hiring. I would start out by seeing if local hospitals require BSN or if they will hire ADN as new grads. If you're lucky enough to live where ADN's are okay, then I would do that! Get the important, clinical skill based learning done and start working asap. I find that to be lacking in my ABSN program. You can always do an online RN-BSN program after graduation - hopefully when you will have tuition reimbursement too! :lol2:Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

22 Posts; 1,095 Profile Views

Good information!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

rubato is a ASN, RN and specializes in Oncology/hematology.

1,111 Posts; 15,710 Profile Views

The people in my class with small children seemed to really struggle. Between sick kids, child care issues, husbands having to travel for work or working long hours, and the fact that as moms we still tend to be the ones to run everything, it was really hard for them. I had a teenager and still had a tough time, but it was a little easier. With the right type of support system, it's totally doable, but without that, it can be tough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

KellyRN2013 has 7 years experience.

112 Posts; 2,734 Profile Views

It can be done! I was a teen mom and had my son when I was 16. I was then out on my own and i finished my high school with my Advanced Studies Diploma. I put myself through LPN school and was an LPN for 6 years and then I put myself through RN school. No, I was not married and No my sons father has never been in his life and no I didn't live off the government because I worked full time and made too much money. I worked full time while going to school both times and right now I am back in school getting my masters. yes, it can be challenging but it can be done if you put your mind to it. I would recommend finding a baby sitter that will baby sit your children and that is reliable. i would also recommend maybe finding a nurse who is a baby sitter so that way if they are just running a mild fever or they are not terribly ill then you can still attend school. yes, I did have to miss some days of school but I was still able to have good attendance and make great grades. About the studying, I would have to study after my child went to bed. While I was in school I roughly got about 5 hours of sleep a night. Sometimes more if I didn't have studying to do. You can do it!!!! It can be done as long as you put your mind to it and you really want to succeed! yes, it will be the few hardest years of your life but it is oh so worth it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

edwardsrn62 has 1 years experience.

18 Posts; 1,151 Profile Views

It was hard... I was a single mother going for my BSN, RN. My son was 7 months old when I started. I bartended at night, went to school during the day, and cleaned 2-3 homes on the side for extra cash. It was hard. I was condemned A-LOT by A-LOT of people who didnt think I would make it and said I should just stay home with my son, but I knew I wanted to be able to give him a better life. I graduated from nursing school 8 days after my sons 5th birthday (I failed a class and had to go an extra semester) but I made it! I passed the NCLEX on the first attempt and got a job right away. It is hard... There may be people putting you down, sleepless nights and guilt for not being with your kids, but I PROMISE YOU it was worth every tear! You can do it you just HAVE TO BE COMMITTED that no matter what you will not quit! Its worth it a million times over!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ER(notso)n00b has 2 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in ER.

184 Posts; 7,563 Profile Views

It was hard, but doable. I was in a 2 year ADN program. When I started, my kids were 2, 4, and 6. My husband is a nurse who was working 4-5 twelve-hour shifts each week. Honestly, sometimes I don't know how we made it through. I was just super determined. Everything else in my life suffered. I didn't cook much, and my kids watched a lot of TV so I could study for exams and work on care plans. I grew apart from my old friends, but made new friends in my program. Luckily we had family close by to help with the kids. It was all worth it - I graduated and am working 3 days a week now. My husband was able to cut back to 3 days a week too, so we have more family time than ever before. But honestly, we barely survived my non-accelerated program. Doing an accelerated one would have killed us all. Take your time and try to enjoy the journey.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

19 Posts; 820 Profile Views

I am currently in an ADN program and I have four kids ages 2, 4,6,8. My husband is in the military and is currently stationed in Korea (I chose to stay) My mother in law moved in to help me. Without her moving in I would not be in the nursing program. Clinical start @630, so I have to leave the house at @530. My mother in law gets the kids dressed and walks them to bus stop. The only bad thing is she can not drive. So winter is coming and I really do not know how that is going to work. I have a hard time studying because the kids are around me whenever I am home. It is very difficult juggling kids and school. But it is doable. My grades are very good. I get home real late, most time around 5:00pm or later, just from practicing for lab. If I was in an accelerated program I would literally be sick from exhaustion, stress, and lack of sleep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×