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Most relevant 2nd choice job for experience to get into L&D

Ob/Gyn   (3,755 Views | 11 Replies)

1,653 Profile Views; 26 Posts

I'm planning on applying for L&D jobs when I graduate but realize that it can be difficult to get a job in L&D as a new grad. Is there a particular specialty/unit (besides the obvious postpartum) that would benefit me in terms of getting into L&D after the 1st year? I'm looking at general GYN surgical units and things like that. Would it be helpful at all to work outside of the hospital in women's health (i.e. Planned Parenthood) or do you think it would be preferable to have med/surg experience? Thanks for any input!!

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serenity1 has 7 years experience and specializes in labor & delivery.

266 Posts; 8,274 Profile Views

Several of the new hires in L&D where I work that did not have L&D or postpartum experience came from the ED. Good Luck!!

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26 Posts; 1,653 Profile Views

Thanks! I'll keep that in mind!

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Seas has 4 years experience and specializes in Telemetry, OB, NICU.

519 Posts; 9,845 Profile Views

L&D wants more of "critical care" experience like ICU, ER, and such. Because L&D itself is a critical area and they need nurses who can do the critical thinking and act fast.

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26 Posts; 1,653 Profile Views

Any other areas you can think of? I've heard it's also difficult to get ER and ICU jobs as a new grad which presents me with the same dilemma. Thanks for your input!

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402 Posts; 8,761 Profile Views

Any other areas you can think of? I've heard it's also difficult to get ER and ICU jobs as a new grad which presents me with the same dilemma. Thanks for your input!

I currently work at a large teaching hospital, and they hire a TON of new grads for the ER. I know they hire many to work in the NICU, some in STICU, and other areas you wouldn't think of.

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40 Posts; 1,888 Profile Views

DO NOT leave the hospital if you want to get into L&D. They do not want someone who can do an interview and basic clinic work. ICU is def your best bet. Good luck!

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26 Posts; 1,653 Profile Views

I currently work at a large teaching hospital, and they hire a TON of new grads for the ER. I know they hire many to work in the NICU, some in STICU, and other areas you wouldn't think of.

Can I ask what area you are in? Thanks for the encouragement!

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

6 Followers; 13,573 Posts; 119,282 Profile Views

I agree that clinic nursing will not help. Stay in the hospital. M/S is a great option, as is ICU or ED. Even surgical services (OR, PACU) would be good, because it will give you experience in circulating for surgery and recovering a post-surgical patient, which is something L&D nurses need to know how to do.

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26 Posts; 1,653 Profile Views

I thought about applying to larger hospitals that have GYN surgical units. Thanks!

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402 Posts; 8,761 Profile Views

Can I ask what area you are in? Thanks for the encouragement!

I'm in SC! :)

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2 Posts; 450 Profile Views

I think getting a good experience in med/surg nursing as a new grad is very important. Alot of job postings where I work usually wants you to have atleast two years of medical/surgical nursing before you get hired for a speciality. In medical/surgical nursing you will learn a wide range of common diseases and surgeries, organizatinal skills, many useful nursing skills (IVs, catheter insertions, pain managment, NG tubes, colostomies, oxygen saturations, dealing with code blues, fluid electrolytes imbalances, blood transfusions etc....). I started my first 3 years of nursing in a acute surgery floor and I must say I am so glad that I started there. The amount of knowledge and skills I learnt from this type of floor has really helped me to become a more experienced nurse. Speciality nursing can be great later in your nursing years but I think it is very important to grasp the basics of nursing first before you forget it. So yes, I would recommend medical/surgical nursing first before OB nursing.

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