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Mock Code Blue Scenerio

Nurses   (7,115 Views 12 Comments)
by mtillman mtillman (New Member) New Member

368 Profile Views; 1 Post

Does anyone have a mock code blue scenario they would be willing to share?

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emtb2rn has 21 years experience as a BSN, RN, EMT-B and specializes in Emergency.

2,599 Posts; 28,746 Profile Views

Homework? If so, what're your thoughts? If not, what's the setting?

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That Guy has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN, EMT-B and specializes in Emergency/Cath Lab.

3,421 Posts; 32,902 Profile Views

A pt comes in dead....that should get you started

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SionainnRN has 5 years experience and specializes in Emergency Room, Trauma ICU.

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Walking or not walking?

Zombie code blue....go!!!

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ixchel specializes in critical care.

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You wake up in a hospital and realize you're a patient. You're alone, and you're not sure what's going on or how you got there. You get out of your room and realize the place is deserted except for these decaying looking, freaky people who you clearly realize you should stay away from. Months later, you've banded together with some people you feel you can trust. Civilization as you knew it has been eradicated, and the big enemy is animated corpses that want nothing more than to eat your flesh. You find a compound that you think might contain answers, a cure, defenses, ANYTHING. Instead, the only thing you learn while there is that all human existance is a carrier of this disease that animates the dead. More time passes, and your wife, who is carrying an unborn child, dies. She will reanimate. The baby is still alive inside her.

Your move.

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NurseOnAMotorcycle has 10 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Emergency, CEN.

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Ok, how about this?

A 68yo man visiting his wife at the hospital states to her RN that he feels nauseated but he always feels that way at a hospital. After another second, he says how hot he feels and then slides out of his chair to the floor.

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732 Posts; 10,104 Profile Views

You wake up in a hospital and realize you're a patient. You're alone, and you're not sure what's going on or how you got there. You get out of your room and realize the place is deserted except for these decaying looking, freaky people who you clearly realize you should stay away from. Months later, you've banded together with some people you feel you can trust. Civilization as you knew it has been eradicated, and the big enemy is animated corpses that want nothing more than to eat your flesh. You find a compound that you think might contain answers, a cure, defenses, ANYTHING. Instead, the only thing you learn while there is that all human existance is a carrier of this disease that animates the dead. More time passes, and your wife, who is carrying an unborn child, dies. She will reanimate. The baby is still alive inside her.

Your move.

Does your ten year old son constantly not listen to you? Dang it, Carl.

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732 Posts; 10,104 Profile Views

Ok, how about this?

A 68yo man visiting his wife at the hospital states to her RN that he feels nauseated but he always feels that way at a hospital. After another second, he says how hot he feels and then slides out of his chair to the floor.

Common scenario.....not all codes or rapid responses involve admitted patients!

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ixchel specializes in critical care.

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Does your ten year old son constantly not listen to you? Dang it, Carl.

No, but he does keep shooting people. :\

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firstinfamily has 33 years experience as a RN.

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Or how about, visitor in the cafeteria is eating lunch with other visiting family members when he starts to choke and cannot speak, he is turning blue in the cafeteria, a nurse who is also eating in the cafeteria does her basic assessment, the visitor passes out and slides to the floor. What should happen next? Or we could do a patient, such as Mrs. Wade, 35 y/0 c/0 abd pain came into the ER yesterday, has a WBC of 30,000, is currently receiving IV fluids of 0.9NSS, was alert and oriented when you did your primary assessment at the beginning of the shift. When the tech took vital signs her b/p was 80/40, her telemetry shows Sinus Tach with heart rate 120, her SPO2 is 90% on 4 liters of nasal oxygen, resp. 16/min. When you check her temperature it is 103.6 oral. You alert the Attending MD who is consulting Infectious Disease. While you are waiting for the call back from Infectious Disease, the pt tells you, "I don't feel very good." She vomits about 300cc coffee ground liquid, and goes unconscious. You call a rapid response. Go.

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Christy1019 has 11 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Emergency/Trauma/Critical Care Nursing.

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Or how about, visitor in the cafeteria is eating lunch with other visiting family members when he starts to choke and cannot speak, he is turning blue in the cafeteria, a nurse who is also eating in the cafeteria does her basic assessment, the visitor passes out and slides to the floor. What should happen next? Or we could do a patient, such as Mrs. Wade, 35 y/0 c/0 abd pain came into the ER yesterday, has a WBC of 30,000, is currently receiving IV fluids of 0.9NSS, was alert and oriented when you did your primary assessment at the beginning of the shift. When the tech took vital signs her b/p was 80/40, her telemetry shows Sinus Tach with heart rate 120, her SPO2 is 90% on 4 liters of nasal oxygen, resp. 16/min. When you check her temperature it is 103.6 oral. You alert the Attending MD who is consulting Infectious Disease. While you are waiting for the call back from Infectious Disease, the pt tells you, "I don't feel very good." She vomits about 300cc coffee ground liquid, and goes unconscious. You call a rapid response. Go.

Yell "It's Ebola!" And run as fast as you can. Lmao, jk!

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