LSC/Duluth

  1. HI I was wondering if anyone is from LSC (lake superior college) in Duluth.

    I am about to take my pre reqs in upcoming Spring.

    The NET test....I am under the impression that the test can vary greatly, either just math, reading, and general stuff or a much harder test with science etc. Which one does LSC follow? Just wondering if I take the NET before or after my pre req's?

    I can for sure call LSC tomorrow and ask, thought I would see if anyone knows.

    Thanks a bunch
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    About MShell

    Joined: Oct '06; Posts: 11

    10 Comments

  3. by   mom2cka
    I took my prereqs there and finished my AA, (ended up @ scholastica for a 4 year due to the wait for the program, the time it would take for everything, and I wanted to end up with an RN anyway - Scholastica offered a really good financial aid package so I went there) but remember that I took some sort of pre-nursing test - it wasn't taken until about a year after I was there and it was pretty simple - took about 15 minutes. Unless they changed it, I wouldn't worry - I hadn't had any nursing classes and the test I took was very basic common sense type stuff. I hope that helps!
  4. by   MShell
    Thanks! I found out it is about a 3hr test, but all in all pretty basic
  5. by   cmonkey
    Quote from MShell
    Thanks! I found out it is about a 3hr test, but all in all pretty basic
    *bump* because I wonder if anyone else is at LSC.
  6. by   freezebabyRN
    I actually graduated with LSC on my degree; however, took all of my classes at FDLTCC in Cloquet. I was the first crew threw their program, but FDLTCC may be on their own now not sure. Back when I was going to school at FDLTCC said they would never have a waiting list. So, if you want to apply to a school that does not have a waiting list apply there. Also, in my second year I took clinicals every other week-end for 12 hours shifts and have one class one evening a week. This allowed me to work full-time as a LPN.
    Not sure how long LSC's waiting list is. Something to check into!
  7. by   cmonkey
    Quote from freezebabyRN
    I actually graduated with LSC on my degree; however, took all of my classes at FDLTCC in Cloquet. I was the first crew threw their program, but FDLTCC may be on their own now not sure. Back when I was going to school at FDLTCC said they would never have a waiting list. So, if you want to apply to a school that does not have a waiting list apply there. Also, in my second year I took clinicals every other week-end for 12 hours shifts and have one class one evening a week. This allowed me to work full-time as a LPN.
    Not sure how long LSC's waiting list is. Something to check into!
    I think since they moved to the GPA-based acceptance, the list will be a different sort. I'm hoping that I can maintain my grades this last semester and rock the NET. If I do, I don't think I'll have that long a wait. And since I have little kids, waiting a few more semesters won't be the worst thing ever. Though I'd still like to get in sooner than later...
  8. by   Daisy117
    I am currently enrolled in the LPN program at LSC and am hoping that my GPA is good enough for the 2nd year, which is the RN program. The only recommendation that I can give is to make sure and keep your grades up. For the second year of the program you are competing with anyone who applies to get into the program, not just the people from your class, you are also competing with the folks from the rural group (FDLTCC). I am not certain how big the class is for the 2nd year, but I know that it is smaller than the class of 60 that we have right now.

    My understanding is that as of January 2008, there is no longer a waiting list at LSC, it is all GPA based now even for the first year of the program. Your first year is your LPN license and then if your GPA is good enough, you pass your LPN boards, and you choose to go onto the 2nd year then you are accepted into the RN program. The GPA expectation changes with every acceptance period, it is based off of the number of spots that are open and the GPA's of the individuals who are applying. I can say that I have been happy so far with the education that I have received in the first semester of the program, it is overwhelming and scary at first, but the instructors overall are fantastic. Also the FDLTCC students are actually taking their classes on the LSC campus at this time, I do not know what is going on with the program at FDLTCC.

    Good luck with the admission process.
  9. by   cmonkey
    If I can keep my 4.0 this semester, I'll feel pretty good about my odds, but I'm waiting to see.

    How many books? You still have to wear whites for clinicals? How many hours are you spending reading vs class/clinicals/test outs?

    Most importantly, how bad was the NET? I still have to take that and I have to say, it's freaking me out. I have a BA in ENGLISH and the test questions are stumping me. Eek!
  10. by   Daisy117
    With a 4.0 I am guessing that you will be just fine. For your first semester I strongly recommend a rolling backpack. We spent close to $600 on 12 books and 5 instructor packets for our first semester books, although many of them are now being used in the second semester. If you get into the program and have Deb as your Adult Nursing I teacher, I strongly recommend recording her lectures and listening to them to review your notes on a regular basis, it helped me tremendously. Yes, we are still wearing the dreaded white. If I wasn't in class, I was reading something. I spent a lot of time reading and reviewing my first semester, I am trying to get back into the groove of things now and am having a hard time.

    The NET test is not that bad, you have nothing to honestly worry about. If you are ever at school and want to touch base I would gladly meet up with you to walk you through what my experience has been and what to beware of. Have you taken Microbiology yet? If not I would strongly recommend taking that if possible prior to starting the PN program, because you will need it to be accepted into the 2nd year.

    With the LPN program you are pretty much in class or clinical M-F and the second semester of the program is worse than the first, there is a lot of busy work that is required during the second semester that was not there in the first semester, it may be that they think you should have your feet under you by now so they up the intensity.
  11. by   cmonkey
    Ooh, I'd love to meet up! I'm there M/W 4-9 for CNA class (ugh) but I generally have the whole of Wednesday to myself. Otherwise it's me plus at least one. I do spend several hours each Saturday at Bixby's trying to cram information into my old brain, if you're ever free then. Bonus: mere yards away from stitch & ***** afterward. Woo!

    I took micro a few years ago, so I haven't had to take that so far. I have no idea if it will be enough for the RN. It was enough to let me skip over it as a prereq for the LPN...

    Do you have any idea about NCLEX pass rates? I read somewhere that the school was on probation because of low rates and I think that's the reason for the gpa switch. But I'm only speculating, I can't get anyone to confirm (or deny).

    Six hundred isn't bad, actually. I was expecting a lot more. Good to know, thanks!

    Have you lost anyone yet? I'm simply amazed by the drop rates I see other people describing.
  12. by   Daisy117
    I am not from the Duluth area so I am not sure where Bixby's is.

    I do not know the reasoining behind why they are going to the GPA method, but I do know that most of the schools in the cities have gone this route also. The GPA method of allowing folks into the program I think will help to solve many issues with the pass rate, the individual's who are up in the air about whether or not they really want to do this, but it will also eliminate some peope who could make great nurses just because of a few grade points.

    I am on campus Wednesday's until noon, the weekend's are a bit hard for me right now to get to Duluth.

    We have lost a total of 5 from our original 60, roughly 8% of our class. So that's really not a significant loss. The instructors do try to scare you at first and it can be rather intimidating, but all in all they are very helpful and willing to work with you so you do succeed.

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