Accepted into nursing program at MCC!

  1. About nine months ago I decided I wanted to officially become a nurse. I have a child with type 1 diabetes, I was working as a parent advocate getting the medically fragile accomodated in schools, working with pediatric endo's all over the state, registered with the state, county, and my doctors office as a support parent. So we are pretty much talking about advocacy, and the intense management of a child type 1, as well as encouraging and supporting parents as their child went from MDI to insulin pump therapy. I felt so sure about everything.

    Over the past nine months or so, I have worked so hard to try to get into the nursing program at MCC, and last week I started to question whether or not I was smart enough to actually do it. Seriously, when did a 93% on an A & P exam become a poor grade. I realized that my way of thinking had become rather rediculously scewed through out the course of the last two semesters. I have a 97%-98% in the class, that is nothing to be upset about, it's a tough course, the problem for me was that prior to my exam I had a solid 99% (close to perfect).

    Yesterday, I found myself talking to another A & P student and telling her, "You know what, a test is not a reflection of who you are, it does not define you, and it is not a determinant of how intelligent you are. It's just whether or not you learned what was important to the instructor, and quite frankly, this was the best that you and I could do that particular day." Life is demanding sometimes, and things can't be perfect. I told her that if I didn't get in this time, I would go at it one more time, but that was it, as the perfection level required to get in is crazy and leaving me constantly worried about every single point.

    On my drive home I was thinking to myself, (it's okay to not get in, it's okay to fail sometimes) I just wanted to know one way or the other, and proceeded to give myself a pep talk over my probable failure, and looked on the bright side of being off of the perfect hook. I arrived home to find my letter in the mail. I'm in at MCC.

    Even though I was really excited about getting in, I was more excited that I didn't have to preform perfectly all of the time, that I didn't have to beat myself up over a 93% any more, that I could actually enjoy my instructors and time in class. It made me laugh and then almost cry. Finally, I don't have to be perfect, I just get to be who I am. What a relief!

    One more unit in A & P and now I will get to enjoy it, and be okay with less than perfect. It made me think about how funny life is, how disproportionate things can become, and how tiring perfection can be.

    To all of those who did not get in this time, I hope that you give it one more shot, it is tough preforming at such a high level always, but it isn't forever either. Just for the record, I had a 4.00 and a 91 on the Hesi, so I wasn't breaking any records. I was told from the beginning that I would not get in from just about everyone at school. Part of me wishes I could go back and say, "See, I told you I could do it." But actually, I am grateful to those who told me that I could. So thank you!

    For those of you who are still working on the process, you can do it, I believe in you, and please don't ever let someone tell you that you can't, or that it's not okay to be less than perfect.

    God Bless!

    Tami
  2. Visit blessedt1d profile page

    About blessedt1d

    Joined: Aug '08; Posts: 14; Likes: 7

    16 Comments

  3. by   mac212marco
    I could not have said it better myself- I feel the exact same way. Congrats to you and see you at orientation!
  4. by   Luvcheese28
    Very true sentiment! I am also a type 1 diabetic, diagnosed almost 5 years ago, been on the pump almost three years now, and just got into the Nursing Program at MCC too! I was diagnosed during finals week of my first semester back to school after time off to raise babies. I applaud you for everything you are doing for your child. So many people just dont understand the disease and its kind of scary what people dont know, the people who scold you for having sugar when your are having an insulin reaction. My older brother is also type 1 diagnosed at 5 so I was educated already about the disease and was still overwhelmed. Definitely no days off from being a diabetic and the pump makes my life easier 90% of the time (I hate it in the summer out on the boat and getting dressed up, but at least no more huge purse with pens, meter and needles. I had a 3.95 and a 95 and had also heard you need a 4.0 or forget it so I was nervous as well! Congrats again!
  5. by   MichyMich
    Tami!

    I too was accepted to MCC's program. Although I don't have a child, many of the things you have expressed are similar to my story.

    I too decided 7 months ago that this would be my dream in life. I too had the people saying, "Well you ONLY have a 92 on the HESI and a 4.0 GPA". I was walking around thinking "When in the world did these scores seem bad?". I had a counselor at MCC tell me that there was NO way I'd make it in the program if I didn't work hard in the Fall 08 semester. They said "I've rarely if ever seen someone in your situation pull this off". Leaving that meeting I was distruaght, but the more I thought about it, the more I realized that rubbing my acceptance letter in their face wasn't the answer. The answer was that their comment actually pushed me HARDER to achieve what I had to do. So, I'm actually thankful to them!

    I'm glad we are finally done with the worry and doubt of the acceptance letter. Now, my RN friends tell me... your worry will be the NCLEX! Great! LOL.

    Tami it looks like you are going to make an excellent nurse! I hope that I get a chance to meet you at orientation. Our scores are similar, maybe we will be in the same start group? Best of Luck to you!
  6. by   blessedt1d
    First I would like to say thank you for your responses.

    I would also like to address the type 1 issue. I'm sorry that you were diagnosed with type 1, it's a tough disease, a relentless one, but it sounds like you are living and that makes me so happy. I try to teach my son that it's just a glitch in the system and he must live dispite the glitch. I'm curious as to what pump you are on. We are on the Coz but will be podding it starting in July. I imagine hiding the site or pump is much more difficult for a woman than it is for a boy/man. We are excited about being Wifi'd. I told my son, he will be the first and only person I know to be wifi'd (trying to somehow make it cool). LOL!

    I look forward to hopefully meeting all of you at orientation. I can't wait to dig my heels into the whole thing.

    My hope is that the competition will lessen and there will be more cooperative learning over all, given that we are the next generation of nurses, and hold the power to make working conditions more condusive in the future by working together now.

    I'm excited and scared about the whole process. We should all wear something identifiable so we can spot eachother at orientation. LOL!

    Again, I would like to thank you so much for your responses.
  7. by   Momotwins38
    Congratulations to all who got accepted into the program.
    I am currently in the program and just wanted to pass on some advice that other nursing students passed on to me. If you get a chance, buy the Saunder's Nclex review guide. Many of the instuctors at MCC base their tests by this style, and it's a good way to study. (The further you get in the program the more you need it). Also, once you get your syllubus, there are required readings from the library. You can make a copy of these readings for yourself before classes even start, and then you can have them at home to read at your leisure.
  8. by   Luvcheese28
    I am on the Medtronic Minimed and I really considered the pod until I saw the size of it and started thinking about hiding it. Would definitely work better on a boy! I recommended it for my uncle but he has the same as mine. Actually my pump educator tried them all, she was also Type 1 and she liked the Pod but same issue as me with the bulk with clothes. I really wanted the continuous glucose monitor as well but insurance wasn't feeling it, LOL. Saw online they are a few years away from glucose monitor and pump working together with no more carb counting for us! That would be so convenient the pump doing literally everything and just worrying about infusion points! Best of luck to you, hope the pod works out!
  9. by   SueZQ778
    WOW!!
    Get ready, it hasn't even started!
    Once the program starts, you will see what its like to be a real hard working student.

    Sue
    Last edit by dianah on Apr 28, '09 : Reason: Edited for TOS violations
  10. by   John20
    Wraaaaar! Cat fight.

    To bad they edited the really nutty stuff SueZQ originally wrote.
  11. by   gemberly
    Hmmm... I always miss all the "fun". LOL

    Congrats on getting in. My daughter died of a brain tumor 4 years ago. I have been working on my pre-req's (I started at Baker) since 2006. I applied this year to MCC, after being turned down at Baker, and got in! Yay!

    It's pretty exciting! Good luck and I can't wait to meet everyone at orientation.

    I know it is sad for those that didn't get in, but keep working at it! This was my 3rd attempt and I am so ready to start.
  12. by   blessedt1d
    Gemberly, I am so sorry about your child. I was almost there myself and am thankful every day that things turned out the way that they did. Type 1 is no big shakes compared to the alternative. Many children go unsafe at school who have medical needs and my son almost died on school grounds because of their apathy and carelessness which is why I became an advocate. I could not stand the thought of one more child being unsafe or one more parent being in my shoes. My advocacy is on hold as of about a month ago as far as the traveling, meetings, and letters, but my ear is always available as well as advice. My heart goes out to you, I can't even imagine. I am glad that you got into the program, as I'm certain that you have something special to bring to the table, that most of us don't. I think learning from someone who has been through something so tragic is a gift to all of us.

    God Bless!
  13. by   jabraham99
    Quote from blessedt1d
    Gemberly, I am so sorry about your child. I was almost there myself and am thankful every day that things turned out the way that they did. Type 1 is no big shakes compared to the alternative. Many children go unsafe at school who have medical needs and my son almost died on school grounds because of their apathy and carelessness which is why I became an advocate. I could not stand the thought of one more child being unsafe or one more parent being in my shoes. My advocacy is on hold as of about a month ago as far as the traveling, meetings, and letters, but my ear is always available as well as advice. My heart goes out to you, I can't even imagine. I am glad that you got into the program, as I'm certain that you have something special to bring to the table, that most of us don't. I think learning from someone who has been through something so tragic is a gift to all of us.

    God Bless!
    Well said, I think Gemberly will make a wonderful nurse because of her past experiences.
  14. by   MichyMich
    I'm so sorry Gemberly to hear about your beautiful daughter! I'm so very happy that you are able to become a nurse and use your experiences with your daughter to help the lives of so many other people. Your going to touch so many lives in a positive manner, and I am so happy that you are in the nursing program with us! You deserve all the best, and I know you will kick major bootay because of it!

close