Help termination

  1. Pretty much the title. I'm a new nurse, started my residency, and unfortunately made an enemy out of the residency director. I'll admit I was a bit arrogant assuming I had finally made it and I could relax and focus on patient care my own way(which was the wrong way). Anyway I was terminated two paychecks into the residency with no warning beforehand. Im not protesting unfair treatment. I acknowledge I messed up but now I have no way to ignore that black mark on my record. I know it'll come up in a background check. I've been humbled by this and now I'd just like a chance to start over. Does anyone have any advice
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    About Nursejh01

    Joined: Aug '18; Posts: 9; Likes: 5

    12 Comments

  3. by   FeliciaRNCPN
    My first question if why do you think it will show up on a background check? if it was just performance or an incident at your jobsite then it shouldn't. I would just start over with applying for jobs and leave it off our resume.
  4. by   Nursejh01
    It was my understanding that if you paid federal tax it showed up on a background check. Is that incorrect? If it is then I have no real issue
  5. by   hppygr8ful
    Quote from Nursejh01
    It was my understanding that if you paid federal tax it showed up on a background check. Is that incorrect? If it is then I have no real issue
    Since it was your first job I would not leave it off your resume but I would consider carefully what you will say when asked about the job.

    Some people believe that it's against the law for a previous employer to say anything negative about you which is not true. Many employers stick to a policy of simply confirming dates of employment to avoid litigation.

    Only you and your previous employer know why you were let go. You seem to have some insight into the cause of your current unemployed state. You don't have to say you were fired but you must say something. My personal favorite is " The job was not a good fit - but I have learned from the experience am ready to move on in my career.

    Hppy
  6. by   llg
    I am positively impressed by your insight into why/how things went bad in your first job. If I were interviewing you for a position now, that insight and honesty would lead me to hire you. So, if it does come up in your next application process, be sure to maintain that "I know what I did wrong and have learned a valuable lesson from it" attitude.

    Good luck to you.
  7. by   RNikkiF
    Quote from llg
    I am positively impressed by your insight into why/how things went bad in your first job. If I were interviewing you for a position now, that insight and honesty would lead me to hire you. So, if it does come up in your next application process, be sure to maintain that "I know what I did wrong and have learned a valuable lesson from it" attitude.

    Good luck to you.
    Absolutely!! I agree 100%! Acknowledging your mistake shows maturity, responsibiity, accountability, etc. It shows that you're teachable and you can learn from your mistakes. You could phrase it pretty closely to how you did here.
    When an interviewer asks why you were there such a short time, you could explain the confidence you felt at being accepted into a residency and that you let it go to your head at first, but quickly learned a valuable lesson.
  8. by   meanmaryjean
    Nothing to add to the valuable advice- but 'background check' CAN mean "employment background check' where they verify where you have been employed OR it can mean 'criminal background check' where they check law enforcement data bases.

    Apples/ Oranges
  9. by   Leader25
    Quote from Nursejh01
    Pretty much the title. I'm a new nurse, started my residency, and unfortunately made an enemy out of the residency director. I'll admit I was a bit arrogant assuming I had finally made it and I could relax and focus on patient care my own way(which was the wrong way). Anyway I was terminated two paychecks into the residency with no warning beforehand. Im not protesting unfair treatment. I acknowledge I messed up but now I have no way to ignore that black mark on my record. I know it'll come up in a background check. I've been humbled by this and now I'd just like a chance to start over. Does anyone have any advice
    Wow tough going.I would try running a background check on yourself,see what comes up,but the advice here is really good about owning your part in the problem and recognizing that you can be much better in the future.
    Best of luck for better days ahead.
  10. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Nursejh01
    Pretty much the title. I'm a new nurse, started my residency, and unfortunately made an enemy out of the residency director. I'll admit I was a bit arrogant assuming I had finally made it and I could relax and focus on patient care my own way(which was the wrong way). Anyway I was terminated two paychecks into the residency with no warning beforehand. Im not protesting unfair treatment. I acknowledge I messed up but now I have no way to ignore that black mark on my record. I know it'll come up in a background check. I've been humbled by this and now I'd just like a chance to start over. Does anyone have any advice
    Understanding what went wrong, owning your part of the problem and being able to truthfully say that you've learned from the experience will go a long way to overcoming the setback. Looks like you've got a head start there. Best of luck.
  11. by   Lisacar130
    As long as they didn't report you to the BON and as long as you don't apply for any government jobs, this job will not show up on any background check.
    There are a lot of people who say to leave it on your resume anyway for various reasons but if it were me I would leave it off. It's honestly a red flag when you apply elsewhere and while you probably could still get a job being totally honest and leaving it on, it will be harder and will take longer to get a job. When you do, you'll be more likely to only be able to find employment in a less desireable place with staffing problems which could perpetuate this whole problem you're having because the cycle could continue.
  12. by   TessLJ
    I took a job many years ago in which I was laid off 5 weeks in due to a reduction in workforce. Nothing to do with my performance, I was just the last one in the door, so first one out. I've always left that job off my resume, because it would have just brought up unnecessary questions. The decision to leave that one off has never come back to bite me.
  13. by   NurseSpeedy
    You can leave it off your resume but will need to include it when filling out an application where it asks for the employers for x number of years. Leaving it off and then finding it during a background check could get an offer revoked.

    Some employers just run a criminal background check. Others will contact every single employer and verify dates and re-hire eligibility. Best to be upfront. The last few jobs that I've had checked (one of my clients verified she had been contacted when I was finishing up my notice before starting the new position).
  14. by   ASUdevil
    Definitely be up front about your employment history. If you leave it out and then it comes up in any way, you'll have no recourse and simply be seen as dishonest. That'll disqualify you from most, if not all jobs and can even be grounds for termination if you do gain employment while omitting your work history. Plus, Nursing can be a very small community. You never know when and where you'll run into that residency director or who is buddies with him/her.
    I would definitely describe it as "not a good fit" and that you are seeking new opportunities...which you are. None of that is deceiving. And only give additional detail if absolutely necessary. Seems like you are taking responsibility for your shortcomings and not just blaming others for it. That goes a long ways if you do have to go into detail about the situation. Best of luck.

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