Latest Comments by arob1489

arob1489 825 Views

Joined: Jul 4, '13; Posts: 18 (33% Liked) ; Likes: 10

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  • 2
    It'sYaGirlK and AbstracRN2B like this.

    Ok ladies lets not get our panties in a bunch. It's just a question. Honestly, if you're good at what you do then I'm glad to have you in the nursing workforce. I wouldn't mind meeting my husband in the nursing field. It may tell me quite a bit about him.

  • 4

    I think this is a decent and objective article. It raises valid considerations. I am an LPN and I've worked at facilities with RNs that made only $2 more hourly than I did. I also currently do home care and skilled visits at my company are a flat per visit rate whether you're an LPN or RN. I really do believe that outside of admin positions or to further education in the hopes of becoming a CRNA or whatever, the financial cost outweighs the benefit, in most situations. But people should do what makes them happy

  • 1
    Fiona59 likes this.

    The poster defn said what I think a lot of ppl feel at some point regardless of what position you hold in a ltc facility. Uninvolved families can be the worst. They ruffle their feathers up as if they give a damn but would rather watch their "loved one" wet themself than help them to a toilet or commode. The system sucks. There is no shortage. Ltc is depressing. I'd only wish it on my worst enemy.

  • 0

    I personally would be really upset if I or someone I cared about got hirt or stuck in a blizzard trying to make it in for training or an inservice type thing. Also, I know what it is like to make it into work during hazardous conditions and then to illegally be held there for four shifts because the company is too cheap to call in emergency workers to relieve us. To the poster, I say what you did is ok and your manager should get over it.

  • 1
    nursel56 likes this.

    Did they think about the nurses that work doubles and would be standing for 16 hours? That's just ridiculous and very bad for a nurses back and feet.

  • 0

    Well, those board people sure didn't have a problem giving him the run around and taking his money. Those people like to play games and leave out pertinent info. If they knew they didn't have his license from the get go, why even let him get that far and put all that effort in? I knew a girl who was applying for a job and they let her make it all the way to orientation day before asking for a copy of her licensure for a particular state, which she hadn't received yet. Needless to say, they made her leave. But seriously, why mess with peoples livelihood? I totally understand where this guy is coming from, and as a young black female who also wants to start a bridge program next year, I feel race and gender play a part in almost everything. Especially when you wanna better yourself.

  • 1
    loveoverpride likes this.

    Take pride in the fact that you are a very funny person! That, I find, makes for a good nurse, the rest is just mechanics
    I learned not to draw from my own thoughts or experiences or expectations when taking nursing tests. I strictly think of what I read or was told by the instructor.

  • 0

    I am bothered when people tell me that as well. There are so many other environments other than nursing homes that lpns can work in. The can work in hospitals, clinics, medical centers, home care, mental health, planned parenthood centers, specialty clinics (hiv, lgbt, women resource), verteran clinics.....need I go on?

  • 0

    Ok lindy, but what about those that get the flu shot and still get sick? Or people that have an allergic reaction to it? Or religious groups that are against injections? Should nurses in those circumstances be forced to recieve it? And if it was really that serious, why aren't all medical institutions requiring it? personally, some years I get the shot and other years I don't. Just a matter of convienience for me. However, no one should be forced to get it.

  • 0

    I completely agree. I wish more healthcare professionals were like that. It doesn't matter what that patient is in for, I am a human being and expect to be treated like one. People should be a little more humble.

  • 0

    If you like the stories here, I suggest you read chicken soup for the nurses soul. It is full of them. Very well done. I actualpy cried reading some. They also have chick en soup for the nurses soul second dose. Enjoy!

  • 0

    Oh and don't forget, lpns can get certifications that can help land a specific job!

  • 0

    I understand the original posters complaint. It is kind of ridiculous that all three of her clinical rotations have been with geriatric patients and the next one will be a daycare. I would feel a little ripped off. I have heard lpns in ltc say that they use less of the skills they learned in school in ltc. If I paid for those skills I want to use most of them. I work as a cna in ltc and I see what the lpn there does and I love her but most of the time she is doing "paperwork" passing meds, or giving insulin shots. Oh and changing small dressings. I start lpn school in the fall and I refuse to let my first job as an lpn be in a nursing home. Maybe later in life I'd come back to ltc but I want to do other stuff first. I live in massachusetts and so I can get into a hospital, clinic, corrections, rehab, home care, or private offices. Thankfully I will have quite a few options.

  • 0

    I think there is always wiggle room. At the end of the day it is someone sitting behind a desk with a pen in hand checking off student hours. Depending on how far into clinicals your class was, they honestly could have just had you make it up in one volunteer day or shadowing or something. In some first year clinicals a student is lucky to even give an injection. Honestly it sounds like the people in your program just didn't care enough.

  • 0

    I am a cna in massachusetts. Nursing programs are competitive but that's not why I chose to be a cna. I chose to work as a cna to gain healthcare experience but also so I wouldn't take any part of what they do for granted once I am a nurse. I start lpn school in the fall
    I know that I am the kind of person who needs short term gratification which is why I am doing a ten month lpn program instead of a two year program. A lot can happen in two years that can stop you from completing a program. Since you have no experience, I would suggest doing an lpn thing then applying to a bridge program to get your adn in another year. Good luck!


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