Latest Comments by BigPappaCRNA

BigPappaCRNA 3,557 Views

Joined: Jan 13, '13; Posts: 114 (67% Liked) ; Likes: 205

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  • 2

    Why would you want to attend a program, that you are not even sure is up and running?

  • 1
    ICUman likes this.

    Either one will be fine. It just does not matter. As long as you have consistently good, acute patients, either one will serve you well. Just FYI, please don't get caught up with ECMO. It is almost irrelevant. It will neither make or break your application or career. Same with Swan lines, which are slowly going the way of the dinosaur as well. If I absolutely had to choose, I would go Surgical/Trauma, as there are usually more systems involved, more services and specialties, and more generalized learning, but really, it does not matter at all.

  • 2
    Rocknurse and Nurse428 like this.

    It MIGHT not hurt you, but it sure as hell won't help you any. Please stay in the ICU.

  • 0

    I can't say that I would give much weight to a LOR from a resident. They are students themselves, and maybe not the strongest voice at knowing what to look for as an employee and student going forward. I suppose it is better than nothing, but it is kind of some weak sauce. If you feel a letter from an MDA would help your application (and it might, depending on where you want to attend), get one from one of your units medical directors.

  • 2
    loveanesthesia and ICUman like this.

    It just doesn't matter. Either one will be fine. As long as you get a wide variety of disease processes, and all the toys and bells and whistles that go with them, you should be fine. There is probably no case bigger, sicker, or more unstable than a liver transplant. That experience will be invaluable. However, even the busiest of centers don't do that many. You won't have a fresh liver every time you come to work. Kidney transplants are far more common, but far more boring, and not usually very sick. Pancreas transplant patients are diabetics who usually have significant disease in multiple organ systems, but again, how many are there? Only you know the answer to some of these questions. My only problem with the transplant ICU is that you wont have high acuity many days, and this is lost opportunity learning. The CVICU may be better for day in and day out amounts of learning-teaching opportunities. Good luck.

  • 0

    You should be fine. You have done well with the advanced classes you have taken. And you have more experience than many. Do very well on your GRE and you should probably be fine from an admission POV.

  • 2
    CCUnurse18 and ICUman like this.

    Most applicants can have one hole in their resume. Yours currently has two holes, both GPA and experience. Those 2 things, along with your GRE score, get you interviews. Maybe you get in now, maybe not. But with two weaknesses (not a criticism, just objective reality) you would likely be relegated to one of the large puppy mills. Why don't you get a few more years of good, quality ICU experience, including CCRN, and responsibility positions, and then apply. You will be a far stronger candidate, do better in school, do better in clinicals, and opens up far more schools for you to apply, giving you cost, and location flexibility.

  • 2
    ICUman and TBLV4 like this.

    You have your expectations turned around. IT is highly likely you will learn and do far more in the smaller program. And being in a CRNA ony site will get you far better experiences. And YOU will be doing everything. For the purposes of learning how to be a well rounded, solid provider, please, please, please go to the smaller program.

    Large programs in large hospitals in large cities get some amazing cases, but you will be fighting with residents to get to do them. And you will be controlled by the MDAs and politics of the institution. Simply no great reason to go big.

  • 3
    emily34812, Bluebolt, and ICUman like this.

    3-4 years are ideal, IMO. There is A LOT to learn in the ICU that aids your career further down the line. I have been a clinical instructor and clinical co-ordinator for over 20 years now. Certainly one does not need 10+ years of experience, and I have had many students who actually are hurt by having this much experience, as they get set in their ways, influenced by dogma, and less receptive to learning new things. But anyone out there, at all, that can say they knew everything there was to know about their unit, as a new nurse, in 12 months or less is just plain full of crap. It shows in every aspect of your clinical care and clinical experience.

    I get wanting to get thru school, and start your career, etc. But why not do what is needed to get you started on the best and strongest foot going forward, and why not do what will help you be a stronger provider?

  • 5
    Oldmahubbard, brownbook, Riburn3, and 2 others like this.

    If you are doing it right (and it sounds like you are), CRNA can be a very boring job. The vast majority of the time, the case is not hard, the patient is not on deaths door, and everything is quite routine. The vast, vast majority of the time, what we do is easy, but we go through school to be able to handle the .05% of the time when it isn't.

  • 1
    ICUman likes this.

    It is a very quality program. It offers wonderful, full practice clinical sites. A lot of CRNA only sites. Much independence. I would choose it over most other schools. The clinical training is truly outstanding.

  • 0

    CSU Sacramento does NOT have a CRNA program.

    Quote from akulahawkRN
    I applied to two programs as those were the only two that were effectively available to me. It would have been 3 except for one problem - CSU Sacramento was entirely closed to 2nd Bachelors students. Now the BSN program is open to 2nd Bachelors students.

  • 0

    The COA extended to let the current students graduate. That is all. The current students only. All others need to look elsewhere. They expressly did not change their mind overall.

  • 0

    Did you mean to post this in this forum? Asking SRNAs this question doesn't make a lot of sense.

  • 0

    I would also like to add, that the since Wolford is not regionally accredited with SACS, only with the COA, that current students hoping to transfer to another program will not be able to do so. The student might be accepted to a program, but they will not be allowed to transfer any of their credits earned, as they were not earned at a regionally accredited school. The other schools CANNOT accept Wolford credits, without placing their own accreditation at risk. Students still applying to this program, just need to have all the information so they can make their own informed decision.


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