Latest Comments by kelkel

kelkel 866 Views

Joined: Jun 13, '05; Posts: 12 (0% Liked)

Sorted By Last Comment (Max 500)
  • 0

    Quote from iamcutest
    Hi! Last year I took a CNA course, and I'm now preparing to go to school for my LPN. I was just wondering if the first couple weeks of LPN clinicals are like that of CNA...i.e. having to make beds, that sort of thing. How long before you get into the more detailed, challenging aspects? Thanks!
    Hopefully you didn't get into nursing thinking that you wouldn't have to make a bed or change a diaper. LPN or RN, that is part of being a nurse. I too work as a CNA putting myself through nursing school. Yes, you will start out with CNA tasks, but remember, there maybe people in your class who have never done that type of work before so be patient, maybe they can learn from you. You will see that more detailed things come quickly and instructors expect you to be on the ball, so as tedious as these other things may seem, think of it as a break before the ball really starts rolling.

  • 0

    Quote from Couture_Honey
    This topic has been around before, but I was looking for something more up to date. Things have fluctuated in past two years or so. I know people are always looking for salaries and most of the time its for RN's. I'll start ;-)


    Around the Cincinnati area here I'm not sure about the starting pay or pay in hospitals for LPN's. But I know LTC facilities are about 16 to start ranging up to about 22. I've seen ad's in the paper saying $24 but I don't know what that was for. Agencys are about 21-25 dollars for LPN's also. I believe Jobs are plentiful around here! Also when I was up in columbus, I heard an instructor saying they are starting their LPN's out with $27-30 while the RN's get about $40-50 ..I don't really believe that, but I just tossed that out there maybe for some clarification?

    Hi, I am currently paid $20.53 at my full-time home care job and make $22.00/hr working prn at ltc facility in PA.

  • 0

    Quote from kelkel
    Ativan anyone?
    CNA's know it all because they feel they are with these patients everyday and know what they need. Sometimes, it's just a matter of finding the root of the problem, which means sitting there and letting them talk. However, my first thought would be making sure the agitation isn't due to pain, perhaps, ativan or Lorazepam. If that doesnt' fix it, perhaps it's chronic pain. However, I had a demented patient tell me this weekend over and over how one "caregiver" spit in her mouth and touched her. I kind of let it go, until she continually repeated it. However, again, I am a visiting nurse in a facility, and reported it to the charge nurse, who blew it off as dementia. This is really bothering me though.......what if????

  • 0

    Quote from graduatenurse
    i have a patient who is combative when cna tries to give care to her. this cna told me that shes going to leave her in bed instead of getting her up because shes combative. i told her to get another aide to help her she made all kinds of excuses. i convinced her to get another aide to help her to get her up and she got up for dinner. after dinner, she said shes not going to put this patient back in bed because she is combative. she even threatened to go home if she have to put this patient in bed. so again, i told her to get another aide, she refused. so i went to her room, helped her to put her in bed. i had no problem putting her in bed, and we got the job done. so my question is.. do cnas have a right to refuse to take care of patient who are combative? what do you do in a situation like this?
    ativan anyone?

  • 0

    Quote from cutelilmiss_2000
    i have been a nurse for three years and yes i've had my share of not only crabby, mean, and unapproachable nurses but very prejudice as well. i am a black 29 yr old female who went to nursing school so that i could give back to my community. i worked very hard to get where i am now. i graduated from a community college and just graduated june 18 with my bachelors degree. i really do hate to bring this particular topic up but i've never experienced predjudice like i experience it now since i became a nurse. why are caucasion rns so mean to african american rn's? we are just as smart and sometimes smarter but some of them act as if we shouldn't be allowed to stand next to them with the same degrees and delegaton skills. what's the problem? i worked in an enviornment for 2 yrs which was very unhealthy for me. the nurses were very mean, they talked down to you and they often showed lack of attention when you gave them report, and since they failed to really listen, they always seemed to try and call you at home, which i felt was just pure and simple harrasment. i am an excellent nurse and ive worked with some excellent nurses, but who wants to come to work and get treated like sht? i thought that this was a very caring and compassionate field but it has proven to be otherwise. it is not a competition, we are needed to take care and address the needs of our patients. if patients see us acting this way towards each other, they probably think that we'd act this way towrds them. lets get it together ladies and gentleman. what you do to others you will have to answer to. god made us all, we are all his children and he doesn't discriminate, why should you? sincerly not trying to cause problems but need advice and opinions.
    unfortunately, there are some people who feel that "god" has nothing to do with nursing. however, my dear, i am sure you are a wonderful nurse and the only opinions that matter are those who you are caring for. white, black, or anyone for that matter, there will always be prejudice. you are a smart educated woman and you can rise above that! move on my friend, there are better circumstances out there for you, where you will be judged by your talent and not your race.

  • 0

    Quote from begalli
    Nope. Not for me it isn't.
    Well, maybe you need to rethink your profession. You can not be an effective nurse without having faith, empathy and sympathy. Maybe you have a good reason.....who knows.

  • 0

    Quote from czeafer32
    :angryfire I agree with you , you really cannot avoid that kind of environment , in every work place you can always find somebody whose always looking for somebodys mistakes without looking how themselves also worked . I just observed that those who are doing that , are those staff who were just covering their shortcomings .

    I can relate to limited patience, but however, weren't we all new nurses at one time? Not to mention, I will never forget one of my instructors stating, "The day a nurse thinks she/he knows everything makes she/he dangerous." I am reading so many of these forums and it makes me very upset to see criticism. Everyone needs to sit down and think about why they are in nursing! Nursing is a calling from God, not because it pays well, where in, it really doesn't. I can honestly say, I love my patients and would move heaven and earth to make them feel better. However, I am a hospice nurse, and am not as cold hearted as i have seen other nurses being. Its all about they paycheck for some people I guess. Sorry for rambling, but I get so disgusted sometimes. You will be a great nurses and don't worry about your piers, you will learn from the right person and find your niche.

  • 0

    Quote from Strandysmommy
    I was thinking at first of going for my Medical Assistant degree, since I want to work in a clinic so badly. I heard so much about how LPN's are getting phased out and only CMA's are getting jobs at clinics, and CMA's are higher up than LPN's. This of course coming from recruters from CMA programs. It would seem that the only difference between CMA's and LPN's are the fact that Med Asst's. get training in lab and x-ray. Well, I already am a certified Phlebotomist, and so I have that going. Any of you guys and gals work alongside Med Assts? Anyone work in clinics?
    In no way shape or form is a CMA higher than an LPN. LPN's receive much more intensive education. We are to practically know just as much as an RN in a shorter period of educational time. LPN's ARE nurses, sometimes, especially recruiters tend to forget that.

  • 0

    Quote from caligirl2
    Hello:

    I am about the embark on an LVN program at my local college....however I just need some clarifying here.

    Any input is most valuable.
    What type of input are you seeking?

  • 0

    Quote from L&D_2b
    Does anyone know if there is an LPN magazine to subscribe to? I found RN Magazine but no LPN ones.
    Thanks!
    Yes, absolutely. I have just subscribed myself. I received a flyer in the mail, it's LPN 2005 by Lippencott and Williams, I would hit their website to subscribe.

  • 0

    I remember the first thing one of my instructors taught was "nurses eat their young" and how true that is. Maybe hospital nursing in an environment like that is not for you. There are so many others aspects of nursing. Consider homecare or hospice care where you work independently and not in a "shop" environment. You will be o.k. Sometimes you just have to shake it off.

  • 0

    Quote from wannabenursetx
    I'm starting my prereqs this August for my ADN, and also plan to get my certification as a nurse's aide so that I can work through school, or at least the prereq portion! Hospice nursing has ALWAYS been at the top of my list as probably the most rewarding and fulfilling area of nursing. I truly feel that I am drawn to it. My biggest fear is - since you are dealing with end-of-life issues and a patient that is not ever going to get any better because they are dying - how do you make peace with this within yourself? I know it takes a very special kind of person to do this, and not all of us are cut out for it, but how did you know for sure? I've contacted the director at our local hospice and requested info. on volunteering. They also employ CNA's as well.

    Any advice??
    The only true advice you can receive is...you will know. I am a hospice nurse and could not imagine doing anything else. As grim as it may sound, it is very rewarding. Ultimately, we are all going to die and it is a priveledge to be present in someones last step of life. Also, you are making sure they are comfortable taking that step. Hospice nursing isn't just about the patient either, it is about the entire family (friends). Personally, I love children, however, I could not do pediatrics or OB. Your will know what your calling is. I worked as a CNA on a cancer floor, and was thinking that I should just go back into sales and forget this whole "nursing" thing, when a dying patient told me "don't ever stop doing what your doing" and that's all she had to say. God spoke to me that day, and I continue on in hospice. Hospice care is definitely not for everyone, just as any other aspect of nursing, but you will know what is right for you.



close