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Joined: Jun 17, '12; Posts: 33 (58% Liked) ; Likes: 53

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  • Jun 10 '13

    Quote from calivianya
    I am definitely two people. Maybe even more than two... xD

    I get told by my patients quite frequently how refreshing it is to have someone who really cares. I bend over backwards to get them anything they need and 99% of what they want. I always try to make time to talk, I'm friendly, I'm patient, I'm personable, and I'm highly organized. I am also very perky - I had a manager tell me it was refreshing to see someone around with so much positive energy, and that I was a great influence on the rest of the staff.

    When I get off work, I'm a total sarcastic people-hater. It's funny how I can sit and politely listen to a patient talk when they're upset for 20 or more minutes, but I will absolutely be rude as all get out to people in the mall, on the roads, etc. I seriously have zero tolerance for the masses outside of the job. I get told often that I am really evil and sarcastic. I think I use up all of my perky and my people skills at work, and there are absolutely none of either left for when I walk out of the hospital. I also am a very messy housekeeper.
    I think we might be twins...

  • Jun 10 '13

    I am definitely two people. Maybe even more than two... xD

    I get told by my patients quite frequently how refreshing it is to have someone who really cares. I bend over backwards to get them anything they need and 99% of what they want. I always try to make time to talk, I'm friendly, I'm patient, I'm personable, and I'm highly organized. I am also very perky - I had a manager tell me it was refreshing to see someone around with so much positive energy, and that I was a great influence on the rest of the staff.

    When I get off work, I'm a total sarcastic people-hater. It's funny how I can sit and politely listen to a patient talk when they're upset for 20 or more minutes, but I will absolutely be rude as all get out to people in the mall, on the roads, etc. I seriously have zero tolerance for the masses outside of the job. I get told often that I am really evil and sarcastic. I think I use up all of my perky and my people skills at work, and there are absolutely none of either left for when I walk out of the hospital. I also am a very messy housekeeper.

  • Apr 24 '13

    In addition to being a nurse I am an editor; I spend too much unpaid time worrying a bad sentence or paragraph the way a dog (perhaps a Schnatterhund) worries a bone, trying to make it something it isn't. I abhor bad writing because it so often bespeaks lazy thinking. I'm not going to be mistaken for the nursing world's answer to Hemingway or Asimov, but I do try my best.

    You are right, there's far too much very bad writing on AN (and yes, I give ESL speakers a pass on that judgment). Alas, it's the same in every public forum. If I could wave the magic wand they took away from us when we graduated, it would be to wipe bad writing from the face of the planet. That would remove considerable occasions for wry laughter, but I could live with that if I didn't have to keep murmuring, sotto voce, "Oh, sweet lord, didn't you take 8th-grade English?" or "How the bloody hell did you get a graduate degree?"

  • Apr 17 '13

    Hi everybody,

    I'm starting my first hospital job and am in the training program right now. Since I started nursing school I've found myself collecting quotations that help me get through the day. For all you veteran (and new) nurses, I'm wondering what quotes help you focus, vent, relax, or whatever. Not necessarily looking for quotes specifically mentioning nursing, but instead about life in general.

    Here are some I've collected so far:

    "Never pass up an opportunity to keep your mouth shut." -- Unknown origin

    "To be happy, we must not be too concerned with others." -- Albert Camus

    "Don't let your limitations overshadow your talents." -- From a fortune cookie

    "My life has no purpose. My life has no direction. No aim. No meaning. And yet I'm happy. I can't figure it out. What am I doing right?" -- Snoopy from "Peanuts"

    Thanks!

    Dave

  • Mar 18 '13

    Quote from HippyDippyLPN
    You never know though some docs are odd about stuff, it may he a rule he really put in place for his own peace of mind
    Then I'm surprised they let me sign in when the doc is not in the building--that pen could fly out of my hand and land in my carotid artery.

  • Mar 18 '13

    Quote from Paco-RN
    I did my community health clinical @ a facility where medical assistants, LPNs and RNs alike were collectively referred to as nurses. I asked the acting director of nursing about this once and he said it fosters teamwork and avoids inferiority. I still think licensed nurses should be identified as such.
    I dislike this "feeling of inferiority" that seems to be running around. People work darn hard for their titles and they are the ones who deserve to be called as such. You don't see the ARNP's and PA's demanding to be called MD just so they "feel better" about themselves. I am not an RN, I only work in the lab but when someone tries to call me a med. tech I always correct them. I didn't do that schooling I certainly don't deserve to be called an MT.
    There is nothing wrong with helping someone feel they could do better. Lifting people too high is more hurtful to them in the long run. Nothing fosters "complacency" (I think I'm looking for a stronger word here??) like being told you don't need to better yourself.

  • Feb 13 '13

    I've wondered that sometimes myself, about LPNs/LVNs not being as good as RNs... it doesn't help sometimes that our scope of practice tends to be smaller than an RN's scope of practice, but that doesn't mean we aren't as smart as RNs or that we're not as good at our job.

    I work on a Med/Surg ward, and where I work, I have to ask RNs all the time to do something for a patient for me because it's not in my scope of practice, or ask them a question that I don't know the answer to, but that doesn't mean LPNs/LVNs don't have a place in the nursing world. I've had several of the RNs I work with tell me that I'm a fantastic nurse. Sure, I may not always have the answers to some pt's questions, or something may slip my mind from time to time, but I still try to do as much as I can to keep my patients comfortable and happy, even if they do want to give me attitude about something.

  • Nov 24 '12

    Quote from MrsCuoco
    We were told the reason for whites was to preserve a tradition...and they told us to be thankful it wasn't still white nurse's dresses, white hose, and paper caps. Although believe it or not, there's a girl in the BSN program who DOES WEAR JUST THAT. She mystifies us all.
    No nursing cap is a "paper cap". They are made of starched fabric. Perhaps the student who mystifies you has a family member who is or was a nurse who wore her cap proudly. For some of us, it works well. Say what you want, there was no mistaking who the nurses were when we all wore our caps.

    I still wear my cap whenever I work....with the same pride as the day I earned it.

    Mrs H.

  • Nov 24 '12

    Honestly, being in school + hating it = a huge waste of $$$. Quit while you're ahead.

  • Nov 8 '12

    I have a high-functioning form of Asperger's and I SO feel you. I can communicate pretty freely with children (hence my choosing pediatric nursing) but if I float to an adult unit, I have to smile and fake it til I make it. It's taken a lot of behavioral training, but I love hearing confessions of other nurses with social problems.

  • Nov 2 '12

    Try to have a little sympathy for the second career nurse. Not all of us feel as entitled as your example. Some of us had the calling to enter nursing and resisted it (for whatever reason.) I intend to be a nurse who loves my job. I switched careers because I wanted to do something meaningful with my life. I'm an LPN now. I see my co-workers roll their eyes when they find out I'm pursuing my RN degree. Is wanting to work in acute care instead of LTC such a huge sin? I'm happy to be a worker bee, but I would rather do my bedside nursing in an ICU. Sorry. I just want that, and I can't do that as an LPN.



    The Second-Career Nurse Who Hates Her Job

    She earned a BA degree in creative writing ten years ago, and after finding nothing but low-paying temp jobs, borrowed $90,000 to complete a direct-entry MSN program at a prestigious university because nursing is so 'recession-proof.' This nurse has $100,000+ worth of student loan debt, works a bedside nursing position when she expected to go straight to management, and struggles with the concept of the 'worker bee.' She gripes, "I didn't go to nursing school to wipe butts!"

  • Nov 2 '12

    I just love the "Call The Midwife" series. Here's a link to scene-by-scene summary and links to the whole episodes.

    The stuff of life: Watch Call the Midwife on PBS!

  • Nov 2 '12

    And, I knew I still wanted to be a nurse after doing this for almost 4 years:



    Front:








    Back:








    Earned after 200 hours of volunteer work. I received a stripe on the cap after 250 hours. I was so proud of this accomplishment and it was the beginning of a life-long career in nursing later.


  • Oct 8 '12

    I don't work as a RN anymore, but when I did I hated even having students on the floor. I hated precepting even more. Please seperate that from the individuals themselves, who were probably lovely people, one and all. I just did not like my routine interrupted. I liked to do things the way I liked to do them, and I didn't like explaining anything, much less everything.

    I didn't mind precepting new hires that had experience. I think being good at precepting and having a passion for it is a talent, much like playing an instrument. Any monkey can be taught to play a piece on an instrument, but few of us become virtuosos. To be that good, beyond technically proficient, you have to love it, deeply. It always strikes me as odd that it is comparatively easy to find clinical instructors as opposed to lecture faculty. I could lecture competently on almost any nursing subject with a week's notice. In 20 years, I was never more than a mediocre preceptor, even though I was an exceptional nurse. Reason being, I simply despised it.

    And the thing is, what nursing students fail to understand, is that every bit of that is about me, and not one iota of it is about them/you. None. I couldn't care less about you (and I mean that in the nicest way possible, lol). So I'm not being mean, I'm just being, shall we say, focused. I simply don't want you around while I'm working. Let's have a drink some other time, shall we? I'll buy.

  • Oct 4 '12

    I will tell you from personal experience that patients and/or their visitors may innocently be trying to engage you in conversation, but beware. Never trust a patient or family members. Once you get into a conversation with them about any aspect of your life, or any of your political or religious beliefs, the discussion is now about you, not them. If they have to ponder about anything you said, and they disagree with you, or have to think about what you said too long, they get uncomfortable and start seeing you as the nurse who talks too much or gives out too much information. If they feel like they have to sympathize with your situation, they will feel like they have to take care of you somehow, or be too attentive; and you'd be surprised how many patients or family members report to management, "wow that nurse talked a lot about herself and was unprofessional because of that". The manager then has something to write you up about--unprofessional conduct.

    When you are dealing with sick people and their families be prepared for them to be super-sensitive and ready to blame, or at least mention the nurse who is talkative and opinionated, because it's convenient to blame or talk about the nurse and bring her behaviors into question with management. I always tell them, "yes, it's been on tv all week, but i'd like to get your assessment done and treat your pain, because the doctor may be making rounds shortly". I also have said to other patient's, "we've been told by our supervisors to focus on the patient, and limit personal discussions so we can more adequately serve you".

    You just have to find a creative ways to deflect these people. And yes i said "these people" because they exasperating as heck, because you never know when they are going to talk to management about you. Like i said, never trust patients or their visitors.


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