Latest Comments by Miss Mollie

Miss Mollie 1,145 Views

Joined: Oct 17, '00; Posts: 16 (6% Liked) ; Likes: 1

Sorted By Last Comment (Max 500)
  • 1
    SummitRN likes this.

    I don't mean to be discouraging, but I do think it will be very difficult for someone who is entirely deaf to work as a clinical nurse. The reason being is that we use our ears frequently. We listen to and evaluate breath sounds, and bowel sounds. We need to be aware of slight changes in respiratory patterns. Our patients that can communicate will talk to us. I know there are many alternate commications out there, but I can not imagine a sick person in pain, being interested in trying to use something new. Many units use sound alarms to alert when something is going wrong- while a light can be used, you have to be looking at the light- not seeing the light could cause a delay in treatment for the problem, and cause problems for the patient.
    I can imagine, however, that there would be many opportunities in research, or QA, or infection control which this student could be very successful.

  • 0

    We have hired at least 6 new, young grads this past year. They have surprised me with their sensitivity and concern for patients. They (perhaps because they don't feel like second class citizens) have doggedly persued physicians to get patients better pain control, rapid treatment for unusual lab values, and so on. What great patient advocates! Some are more patient than others, but I think you will find that in older RN's as well. In general, they work pretty well with the confused population- trying all sorts of alternatives to restraints and sedation. (Some of our older RN's simply restrain and sedate- stating they are too tired, or can't be bothered to try somethign else).
    Most were exposed to lack of control over bodily functions at some point in school- and still chose to enter nursing.
    I have also seen a few RN's with the very made up look (lots of hair, acrylic nails) in hot persuit of the young MD- but they don't seem to last very long, no matter what their age.
    I think Oramar has some very valid points about the values present in todays society not being very compatible with nursing, but I am not sure that it only applies to the youngest generation of nurses.

  • 0

    Several hospitals in my area use the externship program- try looking at High Point Regional hospital, Moses Cone health system, and Alamance Regional Medical Center, UNC hospitals and Duke Univ Medical Center. An externship program to be successful must offer something other than a Nuse Aide role- many students are already nurse aides- they want something more out of the externship. Some of the places offer classes on a weekly basis (EKG interp, pharmacology), rotations through different departments, pairing with a nurse- and doing nothing but nurse aide two tasks. Noen that I am aware of, however, involved giving meds, or things like that.

  • 0

    Part of the problem is that there are so many more attractive career options- IT, and such for everyone today. But one of the things that I see that irritates me is that initial pay is appropriate and generally pretty good for a new nurse. Then it never really increases that much. Case in point- a nurse with 8 months in the ICU is making 16.00 an hour. A nurse with 2 yrs exp in the same place is making 16.30 an hour. A nurse with 12 years experience in that ICU makes about 18.00 an hour. Pay is not commensurate with experience.

  • 0

    I used to have a job where I had to speak in front of big crowds. It is normal to be a little nervous. #1 know your material- don't make a speech that has to be said exactly like it is written, or when you stumble, you will get flustered. Instead write each topic section on an index card, and the main points about it. The sentences will come.
    Try to practice a little in front of friends.
    If you will have a friend in the audience- and there is to be a question section afterwards, have him or her have a question you know you can answer- it will make you feel better when some come in that you may not know the answer for.
    If all else fails, picture your instructors in their underwear. Good Luck.

  • 0

    I recommend you call your local community college and talk about enrollment into the LPN or ADN (RN) program. In addition, it would be a good idea to work as a Certified Nurse Aide to see how you like workign with sick people. You can get a Nurse Aide class at your community college, or sometimes hospitals or nursing homes give them for free if you agree to work there after.
    If you really want ER (and I can tell you from experience in an enormous level one trauma center, it is not like the TV show ER), you will probably want to persue an RN degree rather than an LPN degree- but some people have gotten their LPN, and worked as an LPN while getting the RN degree, and have learned a lot by doing it that way.
    I would also suggest you shadow a nurse for a shift or two at a local hospital and talk to them about their jobs, see what they like and do not like.

    The best way to get started is to call the local community college, make an appointment with a career advisor- that person will help you choose classes to get you started and help you design a plan to reach your goals. Good Luck!

  • 0

    I agree with the above posters. We have a lot of different programs for high school students to come and work/volunteer be mentored in our hospital. They come, and see what the reality is, and choose a different profession. I have had so many tell me that they would rather not do what they see me doing, especially after they interact with an unhappy family member/patient.
    I do not believe that the need for younger nurses is the main problem. There are so many liscenced nurses out there who do not practice nursing because it is so stressful or difficult to them. You recruit them, but they do not stay in nursing.
    I get 1000.00 for referring an experienced acute care nurse that then takes a position at my hospital. I don't think thats a solution either...One thing that they are working on at the hospital I work for is a retention bonus, so much for each year of service. It is a new idea, not many hospitals have it- but remember it does not good to have a bunch of nurses who will not stay in the profession. I'd rather recieve a bonus for staying put- therefore requiring no orientation etc (saves a lot of money-look at the cost to orient a new grad RN, it is astounding).

  • 0

    Hey,
    DO not panic if there is no liscence after the time that Tim mentioned. It took 12 days for my liscence to appear (magically) on the Board's computers. I have a friend from MD who says they are very slow- you probably did just fine. I felt that same way when mine shut off at 75- I kept thinking, wait! I know more!! Let me show you what else I know!! Good Luck. and Welcome to the US.

  • 0

    Daz,
    I will probably get quite a few negative comments here, but isn't this your homework? I know the answers to all three of the scenarios- they are not difficult, and are all easily looked up in a text book. I'm not going to post the answers though because I think part of going to school is learning this stuff, by looking it up in books- not by having the answer given to you. WHile you might have doen some work on your own, you don't give us any idea of what you think these pt's problem are in your post. I'm happy to help students, but I am not going to do your homework for you.

  • 0

    WHile we do not have the wings on our catheters, we tape them in a similar way. I think they would fall right out with just the tegaderm. I used to work at a hospital that had little IV start kits- everything in the kit was sterile- including some quarter inch tape. Perhaps that would satisfy the infection control nurse? currently, we just put a little betadine at the insertion site. and I must admit, on occasion, I tape the entire IV up with silk tape and forgo the tegaderm entirely. It just doesn't hold.

  • 0

    I agree with Doey. Seems it is ok to give less, but not to give more. In essence you are "holding" some of the dose. Completely holding a dose would be appropriate. Our MAR's come up with the dose written say 2 mg, underneath it it says the amounts we can give. it will say whatever,and then underneath it will say dose is 1-4mg. Maybe you can get them to write that if it is becoming an issue or problem. But I do that all the time, especially because in our neuro population, MD's get sort of irritated if you have "knocked" out the pts neuro exam.

  • 0

    Cam,
    Keep working at it. Try to see what it is that gets you behind. For me, it was bathing on nights. I would put it off and put it off and then a crisis would happen and no one would get a bath. Now, I just get them done, and wait for the crisis. Be sure to ask for help when you need it. you do not need to be super nurse and do everything, nursing is a 24 hour job. I do think it is normal to think about the patients and that sort of thing. But you also need some sleep and some FUN! Do you have someone you went to school with (another new grad) who you can talk to? It tends to help to share experiences.
    You also seem to have no idea as to how you are doing. Maybe you need to ask your manager/preceptor how they feel you are doing. You might be pleasantly surprised at what they say! Organization is difficult, but eventually you will hit on a system that works for you. Keep your chin up.

  • 0

    Ted,
    to be honest, I think putting an IV in when you draw labs and keeping it a saline lock, or hep lock whatever you guys use, is a good idea. Our ED does do that. We find the pt likes getting only one stick- especially if they have bad veins. I don't see any point in KVO fluids- a well flushed lock will stay for hours. But, if you are going to stick them, why not put the IV in and then DC it if not needed. I realize there is an extra expense involved which is bad, but it is nice when you get a critical value you weren't expecting to be able to just start the meds. AN interesting topic, I never thought much about it, one stick or two- but now that I am thinking I can see some economic things as well as the danger of sending someone home with one in ( has been done by a known drug user, eeek) etc. Thanks for the interesting idea.

  • 0

    I will admit, I almost died laughing when I first read this post. Do you really think CE that there are a lot of people going into nursing for the excellent Monetary benefits? We are in the middle of yet another nursing shortage, caused in part by low wages and bad working conditions.
    A question- how is being a volunteer connected with nursing? I volunteer for the YMCA- but not because I am a nurse. I also volunteer for a free clinic- because I am a nurse and concerned about health care for the indigent.
    Your statement about jumping in a heartbeat without any concern about money (or anything else it appears...) does not reflect "nursing" It reflects a personality trait common to many nurses- that of Marytr. That really isn't healthy.
    I'm with Julie- I enjoy caring for and helping people (I work Trauma ICU) and I enjoy having a roof over my head...

  • 0

    I have successfully worked Night shift now for four years, but have recently switched to days and love it. I can not suggest anything in particular, but there are several websites dedicated to shift workers- they have a lot of hints. One really good site is www.shiftwork.com Maybe they can help you out a little, they have some great tips for balancing family life with shift work.


close