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Joined: Jan 14, '12; Posts: 542 (39% Liked) ; Likes: 481

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  • Jun 4

    Hi there. Sorry you had a bad night! It happens.

    They tell us all the time in nursing school that although we may perceive OUR patient's needs to be the most urgent (you are right; no one would want to be rolling around in their feces), there may be other pressing matters like changes in another patient's condition.

    When nurses take report, they have a LOT more to hear/say than we CNA do. All CNAs say during report is, "So & so needs to be toileted at X time, so & so got up and fell this morning, I showered so & so this afternoon, watch So & so because they always get up several times at night." Nursing report can be very long because there is just so more to it than med passes. Perhaps on a regular night when nothing major occurred, the colostomy bag would have been addressed sooner.

    I would just let it go. You were trying to do a good thing for your resident; however, you know the night CNA was there. It would have been possible to just clean up the resident, put him to bed, and ask the night CNA to keep an eye on him.

  • May 30

    Hi there. Sorry you had a bad night! It happens.

    They tell us all the time in nursing school that although we may perceive OUR patient's needs to be the most urgent (you are right; no one would want to be rolling around in their feces), there may be other pressing matters like changes in another patient's condition.

    When nurses take report, they have a LOT more to hear/say than we CNA do. All CNAs say during report is, "So & so needs to be toileted at X time, so & so got up and fell this morning, I showered so & so this afternoon, watch So & so because they always get up several times at night." Nursing report can be very long because there is just so more to it than med passes. Perhaps on a regular night when nothing major occurred, the colostomy bag would have been addressed sooner.

    I would just let it go. You were trying to do a good thing for your resident; however, you know the night CNA was there. It would have been possible to just clean up the resident, put him to bed, and ask the night CNA to keep an eye on him.

  • May 27

    My hardest days involved being new on the skilled unit. It was rough because I knew my company was depending on me to protect their reputation, and produce delighted "customers." Thus, I was running around fetching things for people and that wasted a lot of time. It wasn't a pride thing, but I was quickly overwhelmed by the sense of entitlement and disrespect of the staff by patients and their families.

    There was one woman I cared for after she had hip surgery. "Can I have an iced tea?" I went to the other side of the building to bring her tea.

    Five minutes later: "I need to pee." So I came back, struggled to get her out of bed and into the restroom, and back. She then requested another iced tea, which I brought her.

    Five minutes later, this woman is on the light AGAIN. "Can I have the white pages? Not the yellow ones. The white ones." So I went on a massive hunt through the nursing station for the "white pages." I bring her the book. She thanks me and says she has to pee. I take her to the restroom.

    This pattern repeated...ALL 8 hours of my shift. Between Princess Iced-Tea, the confused dementia patient who kept wanting to go to the parking lot, lots of irritating and impatient family members, my obnoxious coworker refusing to clean a corpse, the RN (rightfully) screaming at me because my vitals were very, very late...This is going to sound bad, but by the end of that shift I was hoping someone would just shoot me.

  • May 27

    Quote from fuzzywuzzy
    Don't be that girl that runs around answering everyone else's call lights if you're not working with people who would do the same for you. At the end of the night you'll have nothing done, and those same people won't help you.
    I agree completely. I used to dread working with this one lady who I'll call "Susan". She never answered her own call lights, and I felt bad for her patients. So I helped her. This became a habit. Every. Friday swing shift.

    What ended up happening was that this woman would sit in the break room for nearly two hours, munching Cheetos and reading a magazine. When it was my turn to go on lunch break... Guess what? She ignored all of my lights AND her lights. Patients complained, staff complained. Needless to say, she didn't last very long.

  • May 27

    Hi missvickie!

    I started out on the rehab side, just like you! I know it gets crazy because like you said--the rehab side is not long term. At my facility they are patients, not residents. The rehab side was all about "customer satisfaction." There is a lot of pressure to get things done in a timely manner so that satisfaction surveys don't tank.

    Anyway, my advice to you is to ask questions while you're taking report. Ask the previous shift's CNA who takes the longest to get ready to do anything, who has to toilet constantly, if any of the patients seem to be confused, etc.

    It's harder to learn a routine when these patients are not there long term, but if you have the answers to those questions, the rest will fall into place!

    Sometimes I set up people who take forever to get ready for bed-- I tell them (if they're not confused or a fall-risk) that I'm going to be right back, but in the meantime..."How about you brush your teeth and wash your face while you're waiting for me?" And of course, come back.

    Don't give up-- the first few weeks are not easy! But once you get used to it, you'll do great.
    All the best!

  • Feb 1

    Quote from ColoradoRocky


    Jenni811, you seem smart, driven and raring to take up the challenge of being the best nurse in the facility. But don't let your ego and IQ fool you into thinking that you know so much -- experience has a way of catching up to you and informing you as to just how much you do not yet know.

    Here is a handy Latin saying I learned many years ago in Catholic school, from which you may benefit: "Acta, non verba". It was a hard lesson for me when I enlisted in the Army (at your age) having already earned my first bachelor's degree (giving me the false arrogance that I was "superior" due to certifications and a high GPA). Anyone with life experience will not be overly impressed by academic achievement like GPA and paper awards. This is especially so if they are backed up by only 2 years of real experience, and very little life experience. I learned early as a non-commissioned officer that rank (or office) will be rendered its formal/legal due by others, but the person bearing that rank or filling that office still has to earn the actual respect. When I got promoted, I was told by my experienced 1SG that in the real world, where things can go wrong and people can die, my college and my brand new sergeant's stripes meant 2 things : jack and squat. It was up to me to show (not just pass exams) that I was a capable soldier and a capable leader by my actions.

    As an RN (and a student at the moment), I guarantee you this: I do not and will not demand respect from anyone when I'm on the unit. I realize that I am just a student, and even after I graduate, I will be just a newbie. But I expect to eventually have the respect of my peers and supervisors, but only after I have done things to earn it -- and not a moment sooner (and certainly not after only 2 or 3 years on the job!).

    We tend to learn best from our mistakes. But life is short, so we don't have enough time to make all the mistakes we need to make in order to learn all we need to know. So take advantage and learn from the mistakes of others. Feel free to benefit from my prior error of ego, and ask yourself "what if I am wrong?" Hubris can bring some hard lessons.

    Couldn't have said it better myself. My clinical instructor praised me at the end of our first clinical. I don't get compliments like that every day, so it meant a lot coming from an instructor I admire. That did not make me think I was destined to be the greatest nurse out of my whole cohort, though. Say what you will about CNA experience being "pointless" prior to entering nursing, but being a CNA taught me so much. The most important lesson was: It'S NOT ABOUT ME.

    So let's make nice. Age and appearance do not determine nursing ability; however, they influence how patients view us and how much trust they are willing to give us. Actual ability and patients' perception of ability go way back (think Psychology 101!) to the halo/horns effect. Your management is probably attempting to tap into the halo effect by overestimating the influence appearance and personality have on Press Ganey.

    It is experience and open-mindedness that make a great nurse. We are all taught that nursing is a science...and an art. You might be good at technical skills, but have atrocious bedside manner. You might be the sweetest nurse in the world, but can't start an IV to save your life. The caring, the knowledge, and the wisdom to make judgments are traits that every nurse needs and hopefully acquires as he/she moves through life and through their nursing career. Even when (if!) I pass my NCLEX, I recognize that I'm still not done. Just because I'll graduate with a BSN doesn't mean I know more than anyone. There is much to be learned from the LPN and the ADN who have spent decades on the floor.

  • Dec 7 '17

    Quote from jt43
    What are the pre-reqs for your program? Do you have A's in all the other pre-reqs? A 3.2 GPA is very high imo with 6 F's on your record.
    Yeah, unless they only counted the F's once for each class.

    OP: I think you should try and retake some of those classes. I don't think your nursing school will let you in the program, even if your GPA is a 3.2
    My local community college requires a GPA of at least 2.5, BUT all pre-reqs must be completed with a "C" or better.

  • Aug 20 '17

    I'm sure that you didn't mean it like that, but it sounds like you're saying a CNA's salary is crap. Maybe it is. As a CNA I make $13 an hour in a skilled nursing facility. That's more than my parents, who are immigrants, could ever hope to make. Maybe $13 isn't so much, but I'm proud that I can buy my own college textbooks and put away money for my wedding.

    It just depends on how much and how hard you're willing to work. There are many people who make a living being CNAs.



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