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Joined: Aug 17, '00; Posts: 4,683 (32% Liked) ; Likes: 4,827

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  • Jun 8

    You can be as obvious as possible but the sad fact is when someone in LTC wants something they usually don't give a crap about anyone else's needs.

  • Jun 2

    So we are NEVER supposed to "make a mistake?" Physicians make mistakes...pilots and air traffic controllers make mistakes.....What an absurdly high standard...

  • Jun 2

    You can be as obvious as possible but the sad fact is when someone in LTC wants something they usually don't give a crap about anyone else's needs.

  • May 31

    You can be as obvious as possible but the sad fact is when someone in LTC wants something they usually don't give a crap about anyone else's needs.

  • May 28

    You can be as obvious as possible but the sad fact is when someone in LTC wants something they usually don't give a crap about anyone else's needs.

  • May 28

    Working day shift we have fewer visitors then evening shift so our challenge is usually other departments and they have been asked numerous times to keep interruptions to a minimum during our med pass but they all seem to feel that their needs are always urgent. I have NO problem telling anyone in a polite and professional manner that I will get back to them when I am through and that includes shift report,not only med pass.
    It's usually off the hook on weekends. If a family/visitor approaches me with a request for a cna I always instruct them to go back to their loved ones room and use the call bell. People just don't THINK. I've been in the middle of assessing an acutely ill resident more then once and had to tell folks visiting other residents to back off....Seriously-don't you see the pool of blood on the floor from the fall? Do you see the stethoscope in my ears? I can't really hear the B/P if you turn your mother's TV up to "blast".

  • May 25

    Quote from merellis2009
    When I am giving you discharge instructions and tell you "nothing in the vagina for 6 weeks" don't look at me with a blank look and say "But can I have an orgasm?!" I can't very professionally ask you how you plan on getting it without putting something into your vagina during your recovery period.
    .
    Not trying to highjack the thread but this one made me laugh out loud! That thingee down there- It rhymes with Doris.....you know? no vag.pen. needed....

  • May 15

    Quote from LearningRN
    Also, whenever I go to a podiatrist they seem to dismiss me because my pain isn't as bad compared to other people who have it Please help... I need your prayers...
    Sounds like you need another podiatrist.I was miserable with it some years ago.My family doctor treated me with nsaids,I iced and taped and rolled my feet on cans but nothing helped.He injected me with cortisone which gave me great relief but only for a few months.Then he sent me to a podiatrist who injected me again and fitted my with orthotics (my insurance didn't pay and it was close to $500.00) I wore them in every pair of shoes for over a yr-thought I was cured and stopped and of course flared up again.I finally wore them until they disintegrated (almost 5 yrs) and now I've had no further problems and it's going on 8yrs.I continue to wear good shoes with decent arches because my feet are totally flat.I buy 2 pair of shoes for work a year and rotate them so I get about 6 months out of each.

  • May 15

    Quote from nurseT
    never buy viagra in mexico,, they mix it with mexican jumping beans!
    Sounds like a great idea to me...... A never ending erection with a vibrating component....they just may have something there....

  • Apr 20

    So we are NEVER supposed to "make a mistake?" Physicians make mistakes...pilots and air traffic controllers make mistakes.....What an absurdly high standard...

  • Apr 20

    You can be as obvious as possible but the sad fact is when someone in LTC wants something they usually don't give a crap about anyone else's needs.

  • Mar 17

    Fistfight between visiting family members!Back before private rooms were the norm I was working a busy med surgery unit.The hospital was bursting at the seams.In one of my rooms I had two women,one was post op TAH and the other was close to a hundred.And a DNR.She died.The entire family just had to gather at the bedside for an impromptu wake.My post op and her hubby were giving them privacy and sitting down the hall in the chapel...I had two TURPs with CBI and was running my buns off all shift.Apparently some of the old ladies children and grandchildren were 5hours away.The husband of my post op got into a fist fight with a grandson of the old lady.Security came,my supervisor came.There was no other bed for the post op.We ended up moving the old lady to one of the exam rooms.She was still there at the end of the shift....

  • Feb 6

    The OP is also an ADN and as we know that is limiting his options. (not trying to start a flame war-I'm an LPN and I know how that limits me)

  • Dec 28 '17

    I am a firm believer in leaving religion and politics OUT of the work place. We do have a group of staff in an ancillary dept who are what I call "holier than thou" and oddly enough they are mean as snakes. Mean to new staff,stirring up trouble between the rest-carrying tales and such.Talking back to authority figures.Go figure.

  • Dec 1 '17

    [QUOTE]Originally posted by angelique777
    what is the difference b/w a PICC line and a Central line would like this helpfull information thanks
    Angela
    [/QUOTE>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Alternative Names
    peripherally inserted central line long-term intravenous catheter

    Definition
    A PICC line is a long, soft, flexible tube, or catheter, that is inserted through a vein in the arm. The PICC catheter is designed to reach one of the larger veins located near the heart. It is longer and thinner than a regular intravenous catheter. A PICC line is frequently used in the home setting.

    When is a PICC line used?

    A PICC line is used when a person needs intravenous medication, chemotherapy, or fluids for an extended period of time. It is also used when someone requires frequent blood sampling. The most common use for a PICC line is for giving antibiotics and chemotherapy through the veins.


    How is the PICC line placed?

    A doctor or specially trained registered nurse will place a PICC line in a person's arm. The procedure is done either in a hospital or in an outpatient facility. Using a needle or a guide wire, the provider inserts the PICC line into a vein located in the arm. From there it is threaded into a larger vein near the heart. Once the catheter is in the correct position, the needle or guide wire is removed and the catheter is left in place.

    The catheter site is covered with a sterile dressing and the tubing is securely taped to the person's skin. Plastic tubing is connected to the end of the catheter. A chest x-ray will be done after the PICC line is inserted to check that it is correctly placed.


    How long can a PICC line stay in place?

    The PICC catheter can generally remain in place from five days to several months. In some cases, the catheter can remain in place for up to a year.


    What type of care does the PICC line require?

    The dressing is changed once a week by a registered nurse. If the catheter is not being used continuously, the nurse will flush the line with saline solution to prevent it from clogging.


    What precautions should be taken after a PICC line has been inserted?

    The catheter site must be kept dry. The person may bathe or shower as long as the insertion site is protected with a water-resistant covering. The person's blood pressure should not be taken in the arm with the PICC line. The PICC line site should be checked every day for signs of infection, such as redness, swelling, or pain.


    What are the complications associated with a PICC line?

    A PICC line is designed to stay in place for many months. However, the catheter can sometimes cause phlebitis, or vein irritation. If this occurs, a red streak may appear on the arm, and the healthcare provider should be notified. Infection is also possible, but rare. The nurse or doctor should also be notified if the person develops a fever, chills, or a rash.


    .....
    central line
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Alternative Names?
    central venous catheter, CVP line

    Definition
    A central line is a special intravenous line, called an IV. This type of IV is inserted through the chest and threaded into one of the large veins that lie close to the heart. A central line has multiple ports that can be used to:
    draw blood
    give fluids
    monitor central venous blood pressure
    Who is a candidate for the procedure??
    A central line is used for:
    gaining emergency IV access when the usual IV access into an arm vein is not possible
    monitoring central venous pressure during major surgery or after severe blood loss from trauma or illness
    giving fluids, blood products, chemotherapy , and other medicines, as well as for hyperalimentation
    drawing blood samples
    administering long-term IV therapy
    How is the procedure performed??
    A central line is inserted under sterile conditions. The person is usually placed in the Trendelenburg position, which means the head is below the level of the heart. The skin is cleansed, and a local anesthetic is injected to make the area numb. A healthcare professional advances the line until it reaches the large vein of the chest. The catheter is then sutured in place, and a sterile dressing is applied.

    What happens right after the procedure??
    A chest X-ray will be done right away after a central line is inserted to confirm that it is in the right position. The line should not be used until the X-ray is done . A central line can usually stay in place for up to 4 weeks.

    What happens later at home??
    If the person is going home with the central line, the family will need to learn how to care for the catheter. A visiting nurse can come to the home to help the family with the care at first. The bandage at the insertion site will need to be changed every 3 days. The insertion site should also be inspected closely for signs of infection. These signs include redness, warmth, drainage, and swelling.

    What are the potential complications after the procedure??
    While inserting the line, it is possible to puncture the lung. The catheter may irritate the heart and cause irregular heartbeats, called arrhythmias. Other complications may include:
    air embolism
    bleeding
    blood clot in the tubing
    infection
    Any of these complications may lead to the removal of the central line.


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