Latest Comments by ICUkids

ICUkids 1,371 Views

Joined: Aug 4, '00; Posts: 11 (0% Liked)

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    Never heard of RT's running the ECMO circuit. We send any ECMO pts to the ICN. They sometimes have a problem with the size issue (up to teenagers, but the PICU/ICN Critical Care Floats do the pt care side) we don't get enough ECMO pts to warrent training and maintaining competencies. In the ICN they have 2 RN's.
    Diana

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    Pamela A, You incurred the wrath of an angry subscriber, God would be more tolerant. I acknowlege the stress of the situation and tell the person that I will not tolerate the behavior. I have been in mgmt and am back at the bedside. I have a better understanding of what my obligations and resources are. Altho I firmly believe in patient advocacy I believe there is always a way to grease the wheels. I try to pass this on to those who are trying to hoe the difficult path to good health care for their loved ones. Sometimes you just need to point out that certain behaviors give a person minus points. Letting these kinds of experiences run off our backs is never easy, takes practice. Backup from mgmt is key. In any job.
    D.

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    Thanks for posting the story. I hadn't heard about it and I work in a major pedi cardiac center! The PICU docs share some of the RN's frustration about the cardiac cases. Even they find out late "incidences" that happened in the OR that make a difference in treating recovery period. One of the surgeons is a micromanager and tho it may irritate some he is always there for questions and answers. But we did have a case years ago about euthanasia. MD vs RN. Guess who was most impacted? We were told it was the difference of the disciplinary actions between AMA and Nsg. Guess I should be proud my profession has higher standards, but the RN's involved in this incident were basically witnesses. Certainly a learning experience!! I do feel I am listened to if only with half an ear, there is a RN anethisiolgist on the cardiac team who is excellent about taking feedback to the OR. We have had our problems but the worst ones have been moved on to other (unfortunate) pastures.
    D.

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    Boomboom,
    Check out the possibilities in your area. Do you have any acute care experience? Kids physiology is different than geriatric population. But motivation to learn always makes a difference. Good luck and let us know what you decide. With the nursing shortage now is the time if a person wants to change direction in career.
    Diana

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    Thanks Allnurses!! PICU is very specialized and I'm always finding myself trying to check off both boxes on surveys, ICU and Peds but it never really fits well. So I wrote Allnurses to ask if there could be a forum for PICU RN's and here it is in one day. Guess I'll have to check in alot more frequently! I've been a PICU RN for 14 yrs, back then it was in the middle of a nursing shortage (HAH) and I was hired as a new grad!! I love what I do and even though I sometimes think about changing I can never think of something else I would want to do more. I have done mgmt but am back at the bedside. Would love to hear from anyone else. We are presently preparing for JCAHO, starting another training program and trying to staff with lots of short term travelors to fill in the gaps. A bit of a challenge considereing our acuity and census turnover.
    Don't forget to take care of yourselves too!

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    Well, 3 mo later here's a reply. Start looking at the jobs available. In the nursing shortage going on right now we are hiring strong new grads. RN's with experience are considered a plus. Look for a program with at least 6-8 wks training. With didactic classroom also. 12 wks is desired but probably not possible in this day and age. Children ARE different than adults. good luck.

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    We must have great scheduling policies cause it goes by senority and holidays worked the last year. I got both Christmas and New Years off, worked Thanksgiving. (One of the perks for sticking around a few years) Christmas was wonderful. I keep the tree up til after New Years. Hope you all have a Happy and Safe one.

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    When my son was about 10 yrs old his father calls me at work to say he is bringing him into the ER, he had fallen from my horse and prob. had a concussion. I'm asking about pupils and he's trying to drive on a dangerous curvey coastal road. I tell him to give the phone to my son and proceed to do a semi neuro check - and yes, he had NO short term memory. If anything serious he would have ended up in my unit (great care but mommy RN's nightmare) No serious sequelea thank God. Course,a few years later when he broke both ulnar and radial in the tree swing, I was scheduled to work that night, I spent the first part of my shift in the ER and then I took freq breaks to check on him on the floor. Had to reset in the OR but we were having a scheduled elect. maint. shutdown and only emerg OR allowed. We were severely short staffed and thats what dads are for. I also remember being in nursing school and having a neighbor kid tell me my son had fallen off his skateboard and hurt himself, I tilted my head to listen and said "I don't hear him yelling" then started running when the kid said my boy couldn't. (He had gotten a helmet the day before but the same neighbor kid told him he looked stupid!) He was just coming around when I got there, only a few houses away. Among the crowd were men wanting to pick him up. I was adament not to touch him, he was stirring, got up himself and I got him into the car and to the ER, again mild concusssion. He is blessed with my thick head and strong constitution. Has somehow avoided the head thing for years now and is very smart, but doesn't whine. No blood No bandaid.

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    I was a new grad in a PICU 14 yrs ago. Still there, have been up the ladder to mgr, back to my passion of patient care. I have oriented and hired new grads and with solid support they are doing fine. Key ideas are support, orientation programs and recognition that proper assignments build confidence. Not always easy but certainly something to strive for. Good Luck, it is possible.

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    When I read the regional quotes I was astounded! But since I live in CA and the cost of living is absurb maybe I shouldn't be. I have 14 yrs. experience, some in mgmt, I recently got a 3% increase, $36/hr not including differentials. But I also pay almost $2/gal for gas and my apt is $1150/mo for a 2 bedroom. I live 15 mi. from work and where I live is considered cheap! I am still struggling at the end of the month. I have found that message boards really show how different this world can be.

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    I have worked 12 hr shifts all my career, 14 yrs. It is wonderful. My unit would not want anything but. ICN does some 8 hr but only because of a merger, it makes the schedule difficult. I did mgnt for awhile and being there 5 days was more intense than the word can ever reflect. Even if my day was ok, being exposed to the stressors of staff and patients/families was a drain. At the end of my 8 hrs. I had little left to give. I stepped down to go back to 3 day a week and I am so much happier. The exposure to "Intensive Care" can be hard, our pt. population is 80% cardiacs and when we are full at the beginning of the shift and have 6 post ops, the day is sure to be a bit dicy as a charge nurse. 3 days a week I can do it, I have a life outside that is rewarding. We have had self scheduling for years despite threats to go computerized since some of the new folks don't get the system.
    Hope this helps.



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