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MunoRN 60,453 Views

Joined: Nov 18, '10; Posts: 9,019 (71% Liked) ; Likes: 24,462
Critical Care; from US
Specialty: 10 year(s) of experience

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  • Jun 24

    Easy big fella...
    You initial descriptions was not of an ER, but of a screening and admission area of a pediatric hospital, so it should be surprising that the patient's you saw there were different than that of an actual ER.

    As to the patient's you've been seeing on a med/surg unit, it's certainly true that the typical patient on a med-surg unit is far sicker than they used to be, but this is an inevitable trend and there is no real alternative, so it shouldn't be surprising that you'll care for patients that 10 or 15 years ago would have been on step down or full ICU.

    As a RR nurse, the more important question is how will a patient be cared for differently in the ICU? Your example, a patient with an (assumed HR) of "140+" is a good example. There are plenty of patients who could be considered "symptomatic" although the HR is a symptom and not a cause of symptoms, and therefore there is no indication for rate control and there is no reason for ICU level care. For instance, a 35 year old symptomatic pancreatitis patient with a HR of 145 in SR, this is not particularly unusual and is an appropriate systemic response to pancreatitis and a HR of 60 would be far more concerning and potentially justifying ICU level care.

  • Jun 24

    Quote from Kitiger
    If you have permission from the facility, then it isn't stealing.

    If - on the other hand - it is against policy to eat the patient's food, then it is stealing. And it could get you fired.
    Just as a basic word definition, you can't "steal" something that has no owner. If the patient doesn't want the food and therefore claims no ownership of the food, and the facility doesn't want the food back which also declining ownership of the food, then the food is technically abandoned and cannot be "stolen".

  • Jun 24

    Quote from Kitiger
    If you have permission from the facility, then it isn't stealing.

    If - on the other hand - it is against policy to eat the patient's food, then it is stealing. And it could get you fired.
    Just as a basic word definition, you can't "steal" something that has no owner. If the patient doesn't want the food and therefore claims no ownership of the food, and the facility doesn't want the food back which also declining ownership of the food, then the food is technically abandoned and cannot be "stolen".

  • Jun 24

    Quote from Alex_RN
    Anything that has gone into a patient's room is repulsive to me. If dirty trays have gone back to the cart, then anything on the cart is radioactive. A new tray for a discharged or newly NPO patient is fair game, though. However, I usually can find a patient's family member or extra hungry patient who will take it.

    I ALWAYS have my own lunch and snacks, though. Always.
    I always bring my own food as well, although I generally don't have time to actually eat it until after my shift is over. What I eat during my shift generally consists of whatever I can inhale while my patient's water cup is filling up. If you've found a position where you can actually take a break to eat then that's great, but that's not the reality many nurses live in.

  • Jun 24

    Quote from Kitiger
    If you have permission from the facility, then it isn't stealing.

    If - on the other hand - it is against policy to eat the patient's food, then it is stealing. And it could get you fired.
    Just as a basic word definition, you can't "steal" something that has no owner. If the patient doesn't want the food and therefore claims no ownership of the food, and the facility doesn't want the food back which also declining ownership of the food, then the food is technically abandoned and cannot be "stolen".

  • Jun 24

    Quote from blackmamba123
    What is a "toonie"?
    A "toonie" is a $2 coin in Canada, Canada has done away with paper $1 bills (although their currency is more plastic than paper) and the $1 coin has a picture of a Loon on it making it a "loonie", when the $2 coin came out it was then called a "toonie".

  • Jun 24

    Snacks and food from the unit kitchen probably make up 50-75% of my nutritional intake while working mostly in the form of crackers and peanut butter, the rest comes from a Clif bar that I eat in the few seconds here and there I have to eat.

  • Jun 24

    Quote from blackmamba123
    What is a "toonie"?
    A "toonie" is a $2 coin in Canada, Canada has done away with paper $1 bills (although their currency is more plastic than paper) and the $1 coin has a picture of a Loon on it making it a "loonie", when the $2 coin came out it was then called a "toonie".

  • Jun 24

    Quote from Kitiger
    If you have permission from the facility, then it isn't stealing.

    If - on the other hand - it is against policy to eat the patient's food, then it is stealing. And it could get you fired.
    Just as a basic word definition, you can't "steal" something that has no owner. If the patient doesn't want the food and therefore claims no ownership of the food, and the facility doesn't want the food back which also declining ownership of the food, then the food is technically abandoned and cannot be "stolen".

  • Jun 24

    I'm still confused about the idea of nurses "running" when a fire alarm goes off. I have never, ever seen a nurse run because a fire alarm goes off, where would nurses be running to? or from?

  • Jun 24

    Snacks and food from the unit kitchen probably make up 50-75% of my nutritional intake while working mostly in the form of crackers and peanut butter, the rest comes from a Clif bar that I eat in the few seconds here and there I have to eat.

  • Jun 24

    It's common to feel like nursing school didn't adequately prepare graduates for emotionally challenging situations, but I'm not sure that's really the role of nursing school. Developing more effective coping with end-of-life care isn't about insufficient knowledge, it's a personal growth issue, so what is it that nursing school isn't doing to ensure this personal growth that they should be?

  • Jun 24

    Quote from blackmamba123
    What is a "toonie"?
    A "toonie" is a $2 coin in Canada, Canada has done away with paper $1 bills (although their currency is more plastic than paper) and the $1 coin has a picture of a Loon on it making it a "loonie", when the $2 coin came out it was then called a "toonie".

  • Jun 24

    Quote from Kitiger
    If you have permission from the facility, then it isn't stealing.

    If - on the other hand - it is against policy to eat the patient's food, then it is stealing. And it could get you fired.
    Just as a basic word definition, you can't "steal" something that has no owner. If the patient doesn't want the food and therefore claims no ownership of the food, and the facility doesn't want the food back which also declining ownership of the food, then the food is technically abandoned and cannot be "stolen".

  • Jun 24

    Quote from blackmamba123
    What is a "toonie"?
    A "toonie" is a $2 coin in Canada, Canada has done away with paper $1 bills (although their currency is more plastic than paper) and the $1 coin has a picture of a Loon on it making it a "loonie", when the $2 coin came out it was then called a "toonie".


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