Latest Comments by Noimanurse

Noimanurse 3,226 Views

Joined: Nov 17, '10; Posts: 155 (37% Liked) ; Likes: 184

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    I've done some limited research, but have not come up with much information to answer my question, please help if possible. I am interested in obtaining an athletic training certification and/or training? I'm an RN, have pretty good experience and thinking abilities, but I was just wondering if anyone knew about a certificate program dealing specifically with athletic training that goes along with the education and work experience of an RN.

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    I agree with those that say to get a part-time job in a different facility or volunteer in a different facility where you will get experience with sticks. It just takes time. I wouldn't spend my time in a class, its gonna be very similar to what you had in school. Get some real experience with real patients, you will learn alot that way.

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    wooh likes this.

    There is the idea of "reasonable" that comes in to play. Many ER's have curtains separating certain rooms, especially with trauma rooms. Its just the way it is. As for semi-private rooms, again, there is a curtain, sometimes that is just the way it is and its all that is available. Again, my opinion, but if the patient is "so high and mighty" in society, maybe they could take the time to schedule a doctor's appt. I'm all for privacy, but I'll run naked through the grade school if it meant saving my leg or my child's life.

    My thinking is that if its a big enough emergency to be in the emergency room, then you should be simply thinking of stabilizing/helping the patient's health and thats what the patient should be concerned with, as well. If its all you have to work with, then you do you best. For instance, if there were a wreck on the highway, would you keep from removing the clothes of a person to save a life or limb just to maintain privacy? NO, you do the best you can with what you have.

    Recently we had one of our own children in a major ER, he was on a ventilator, the room was divided by a curtain, on the other side was some one complaining of an upset stomach. We didn't once think of HIPPA, we were just glad he got the care he needed, eventually woke up, and started breathing on his own. Most people that throw "hippa" in your face don't have a clue what it really means.

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    I've noticed a huge nursing shortage...it seems that most of the nurses I work with are 5'2"-5'8" so I'm more than a foot taller than most of my co-workers. This nursing "short"age is crazy!

  • 13

    I always start out my shift by grabbing a stack of alcohol swabs for my chest pocket.

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    Fiona59 likes this.

    So if RN experience is not important to being an NP why mess with nursing school? Why not get a bio or chem. degree and go into PA school?

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    sandnnw, KelRN215, Sun0408, and 3 others like this.

    Being a nurse is hard, whether you stand to pee or sit.

  • 3

    Life's short and so is school, study hard, make sure you graduate and pass your boards, don't worry about all those others that say all they are going to do is Peds or OB, just dream of all those job openings that leaves for you if everyone else is working peds and ob. Good luck!

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    Error on the side of caution. If you are licensed in Ohio, stay in Ohio.

  • 0

    How about a European shoulder bag.

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    It would be interesting to see which one of your manager's friends gets the day shift opening.

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    Esme12 likes this.

    I would say you need to speak with your nurse manager about various policies.

  • 0

    Quote from acr2001
    I have trouble wrapping my head around why it is ok for the Doctor to be male, but not the nurse.
    I really think it is about what is perceived "normal". Many times I have told my patients on med/surg., "no, I'm the nurse, the lady that just walked out of your room is your doctor." I may be wrong here, but I believe that its not just the patients thoughts, it is the staff and often times its the staff's ideas that get pushed onto the patients. How many times has a lady/family in L&D been asked, "is it ok to have a female nurse?", but they often don't think twice to ask, "is it ok to have a male nurse?".

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    Apparently that doc likes to get alot of phone calls early in the day.

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    You are probably not going to get many replies since it is pretty rare for men to work L&D. I don't see anything wrong with it, but there are going to be some stereotypes you are going to have to overcome. I can certainly see many current female nurses questioning your abilities since you aren't woman so how can you work L&D? Even though many Drs they work next to are men. You may have a questions from patients, as well, but its just because its something they haven't seen before. My suggestion is if this is what you are interested in, be professional and knowledgeable, respectful of others wishes and it will hopefully work out well for you. I think the biggest obstacle would be winning over the staff more so than patients....Good Luck!


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