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debsgreys 2,988 Views

Joined: Sep 7, '10; Posts: 41 (34% Liked) ; Likes: 22

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  • Nov 5 '16

    What are your priorities? If having a child is more important to you than nursing, then have a kid then worry about nursing. If nursing is more important, discuss it with your fiancé. There's time to have children. Don't stress about it. People will tell you to try now because you might be infertile in the future. It's always a possibility. It's a reality for me but I don't regret it because I do have an excellent nursing career. So now my husband (who also focused on his career) and I have the income to go through IVF or adopt, whichever we chose. Things always have a way of working themselves out. If you have this ideal timeline in your head chances are you are going to be disappointed. I always, always, always thought I'd have a kid by the time I was 28 but here I am, 30 and still trying to figure it out. Again, YOU need to decide your priorities with your fiancé.

    Also, unless you have your BSN, it should not be reflected in your username - am I correct moderators? I am an RN with an ASN working on my BSN but since I have not attained that degree it is not reflected in my username and/or AN credentials.

  • Nov 5 '16

    At the age of 21 you have the luxury of giving your marriage time to form a strong bond before having kids. Even a strong marriage feels the strain when a baby is born.
    You have the time to give your new job your full attention and work any shift without having to worry about childcare. Your ability to make a good living is your most important financial asset. Invest in it now and build yourself a good emergency fund/savings account.
    I was married a couple of years and established in a job I liked when I had kids. Since I was well known, my manager let me work per diem so I could arrange my schedule the way I liked.

  • Nov 5 '16

    Quote from meanmaryjean
    Polishing my white Clinic shoes and scrubbing the laces
    Other people's perception of a male nurse.

    My younger brother drew this in 1984:


    1984b-jpg

  • Nov 5 '16

    Quote from WKShadowRN

    Kardexes when done correctly were the bible of the patient's plan of care (both medical and nursing).
    I miss those. Computer charting makes it very difficult to get a good picture of what is going on with a patient.

    I started at age 40 and that was 19 years ago so there was no smoking in the hospital but I loved hearing the stories by the nurses who trained me of nurses and doctors smoking at the nurses' station and nurses smoking in the little tiny break room and the door opening and smoke billowing out.

    As a hospice nurse, I've been taking care of those older nurses now and many have lung cancer.

    I keep telling them they need to get together and write a book about our little local hospital when the nurses ran the hospital and the docs just went along for the ride. Such great stories!

  • Nov 5 '16

    IVs connected with needles instead of claves. IVP meds were given via syringe with needle into a hub. Needleless systems unknown.

    Potassium kept concentrated in the units.

    Continuing Ed consisted real classes and skills days instead of computer classes.

    DAR and SOAP charting.

    IV lines flushed with saline , then heparin, they were called heplocks, not saline locks.

  • Nov 5 '16

    I'm surprised no one has mentioned glass IV bottles.
    Having to adjust IV flow rates using a roller clamp & your watch.

  • Nov 5 '16

    Polishing my white Clinic shoes and scrubbing the laces before clinicals. Yes, they were inspected.
    The addressograph machine
    Hand crank beds (in other words, the patient could not raise/ lower their head themselves)
    OB before epidural anesthesia
    Wards

  • Nov 5 '16

    Quote from Julius Seizure
    I haven't been asked that in a long time. But when I was first going to college and people found out that I had chosen nursing as my major, I did get a lot of, "Nursing? No, you are smart, you should do a doctor instead." Which was pretty awkward....I mean, what am I supposed to say to that backhanded compliment? Thanks?


    I agree. I once had a doctor upset with me because I didn't have something ready for him just right. He asked me if I was thinking like an RN because it didn't seem so. I was furious. He has no flicken clue how to think like an RN.

  • Nov 5 '16

    POSTED BY jpsartrean
    RATING G
    SCORE 3
    QUOTE I could have gone to med school. It was just the... science part... that would have given me trouble.
    HINT 1 Small Town
    HINT 2 Michael J. Fox
    MOVIE TITLE Doc Hollywood - 1991

    POSTED BY jpsartrean
    RATING G
    SCORE 3
    QUOTE I could have gone to med school. It was just the... science part... that would have given me trouble.
    HINT 1 Small Town
    HINT 2 Michael J. Fox
    MOVIE TITLE Doc Hollywood - 1991

  • Nov 5 '16

    Pockets of severe shortage, clearly. But nationwide, there is a shortage of jobs for the glut of new grads, starry eyed, thinking they would roll out the red carpet once they passed the NCLEX. Nursing schools are to blame; they put those ideas into their heads often.

    If you want to live in rural areas, say of Kentucky or North Dakota, yea you will get a job, more than likely. You have to be willing to uproot your life and relocate if you want work, in many cases.

    There is a shortage of experienced nurses willing to put up with the outright crap many hospitals and other places dish out, demanding more and more for less and less. Many are going to retire, many more cut back and move on. Sadly, many others FORCED out due to being "topped out" on pay with seniority and being asked to settle while watching a new grad hire on for 1 dollar an hour less. What a slap in the face.

    But, I, on the other hand, applaud the Millennial generation. They are not willing to put up with the crap their elders traditionally have. They see what loyalty and faithful long-term employment will get you, nothing at all. They are not going to stay around when moving on will net more. They are smart; they are advancing their education sooner and moving on faster. Gotta hand it to em.

    This will get really interesting when the Boomers really have all retired. I just hope there are competent, caring nurses left when we oldies in the Gen X and Boomer generation need them.

    Whew.

  • Aug 19 '15

    Usually our physicians remove them when they round POD 1.

  • Dec 7 '14

    We are required to have it above the waist, no lanyards allowed. So it gets clipped to one side of my scrubs in the neck line.

  • Dec 7 '14

    Quote from KYgirlRN
    It is very difficult to provide adequate care, especially breastfeeding assistance. Someone is always losing care so another patient's needs can be addressed. It has been addressed with management, but what we hear repeatedly is that our unit will never follow AWHONN standards and we can't afford to staff with better ratios per administration. We are working on some research to back us and attempting to find cost-saving measures that can help justify adding a nurse, but I am starting to think it is downright ridiculous to have to fight so hard for patient safety and satisfaction.
    Since transferring to my postpartum unit, I haven't experienced couplet care. But was told in the past when staffing was very low they have done it. Usually 5 couplets!

    Often times it can be very difficult to get management to make the necessary changes that would promote patient safety, especially if they want to see higher satisfactions scores. If you want improvements in the patient-nurse ratios on your unit, nurses have to stick together in presenting their research when making their arguments. Continue to address those issues and concerns during Unit Practice Counsel meetings; make it a priority each and every time.

    Good luck!

  • Nov 17 '14

    Yes, in the VAST majority of cases, the benefits of breastfeeding outweigh the risks to the fetus. This is true of mothers who smoke marijuana (although you will find many who disagree), drink alcohol, smoke cigarettes, and those who are on medication assisted treatment for opioid addiction.

    Give pain meds as needed, feed baby on demand. Counsel mothers that there is no need to restrict their diet or avoid normal amounts of caffeine and alcohol when breastfeeding. Counsel smoking mothers that while it is best for their health and their children's health to stop smoking, breastfeeding will reduce their child's risk of SIDs, which is elevated by having a smoking parent. Advise moms that most meds are fine while breastfeeding, and they should check with a trained lactation consultant regarding any safety concerns.

    Our low breastfeeding rate is shameful and we should do everything we can to support a healthy breastfeeding relationship. I could go ON and ON about all the things we as nurses do that sabotoge breastfeeding. Skin to skin for a minimum of an hour after birth should be standard. All necessary newborn assessments can be done on mom's belly. Weights and measures are not time sensitive! Baths should be delayed until breastfeeding has been initiated. Bulb suctioning should ONLY be done for a clear indication, and should be documented as such. Monitoring for neonatal hypoglycemia should be done based on symptoms and risk factors- and I'm sorry, but plain old LGA/SGA babies (barring other issues) should not be monitored as a matter of course because a) "normal" neonatal glucose values are not based on values from exclusively breastfed babies, and b) more importantly, babies who are receiving glucose monitoring receive formula supplementation at a shockingly high rate, in an attempt to avoid/correct borderline "abormal" levels. Makes me crazy.

    Okay, /rant over.

    Long story short, give the meds and breastfeed on demand.

    ETA- many may disagree, but I think that breastfed babies should only receive formula supplementation in the hospital with a doctor's order. (not that peds are always all the knowledgeable about breastfeeding, sigh. IDEALLY, any supplementation in the hospital should require a consult from an IBCLC, but. . . pipe dream, I know.)

  • Oct 28 '14

    Thank you for this article and for the amazing difference you make in your precious patients' and parents' lives! I am grateful for all of the pediatric nurses out there who fill the need that many would find too difficult. :HUGS:


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