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OCNRN63, RN 53,298 Views

Joined: Aug 27, '10; Posts: 7,236 (75% Liked) ; Likes: 27,965

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  • Dec 10

    "Every day feels like a death sentence"? Wow. Melodramatic, much?

  • Nov 16

    Quote from RNitis
    i never really understood this. Every time someone starts a new job, comes an orientation period, where the hiring manager will usually add "we'll see how orientation goes, then go from there". But in my experience, I've done orientation, where they threw me out on the floor after only 2 days of orientation, the third day, I was on my own (I know, most nurses can do that, but I just started working as an RN at a different per diem position, so I definitely don't have my routine down pat, yet! It's only been a couple months). When I realized I was unable to be free to them the entire week for a promise of 16 hours, I decided it would be best we cut our ties before I was off orientation. (I know, earlier I said I was off orientation, but I really wasn't. What had happened was they were short staffed, so they threw me on my own). For more reasons than one, I had decided it just didn't fit in my life at the moment (with young children still in elementary school and that I would have to quit my first shift job PLUS my other per diem position to be available to them). I spoke with them about how it just isn't working out in my life with my other positions, I got "well, will you still give your 2 weeks notice?"..I stated, "I don't understand why you would work me two more weeks on my own shifts, if I'm not even off orientation, yet!", "so you'll be resigning?", I suppose so, but I thought "we would see how orientation goes, then go from there"...oh, right, that means its all about your organization, not about whether or not its a good fit in my life! How could I be so naive to think they would actually consider me a person and the fact that I have a life too, how silly of me to assume that!!


    Well, it really is all about their organization and not about you. It's nice if an employer takes your needs into consideration, but they don't have to (and usually don't). That's how businesses work. If they took the individual needs of each employee into consideration, there would be chaos.

  • Oct 30

    This is why nurses fear reporting med errors...severely punitive policies. It's ridiculous to think a nurse (or anyone, for that matter) should never make a med error. I've made them, and as long as I work, I will have to guard against making more. I'm not perfect.

  • Oct 5

    I belong to NNU/NNOC, the organization that really fights for the interests of bedside nurses.

  • Sep 23

    Quote from Esme12
    ....and technically what you said intimidates anyone who believes in Jesus is full of bunk.

    Tolerance. If it helps them be better and feel better and they aren't hurting any one...let them believe.

    I hear what you are saying but if it helps them be better...I'm good with that.
    I don't think that at all. As a matter of fact, I'm a Christian. I just don't believe that makes me a better nurse than someone who is Jewish, Atheist, Hindu, etc.

    I don't think my post was attempting to intimidate anyone.

  • Sep 22

    Quote from billyboblewis
    An explanation of my original letter. 1. Clients of Methadone clinics are usually hard core addicts. The main job of an employee is collecting the fee and dispensing methadone. After that they conduct drug screens and perform other duties to help the clients maintain their criteria for the service.
    Clinics are usually located near the areas where there clients congregate. After they get their doses they hang around in the area of the clinic.
    Clients are using this service in many cases because they can no longer get their durg of choice for one reason or another.
    If this is your first job and you dont stay their long it is no big deal but the longer you stay the more likely future employment opportunities may be limited because people will be suspicious of you and believe that you may be an addict or dealer or both.
    People cannot be naieve in how they look at this. Many of the people who own and operate clinics operate the same way as their clients...with violence and criminal activities. So get real and look at the total picture.
    I would never think a nurse who works in a methadone clinic is either an addict or a dealer. I would think she/he is a nurse who works in addictions medicine.

    I think this is your personal bias.

  • Sep 8

    My first job was in psych.; that was thirty years ago. I was caring for a patient in seclusion. She repeatedly asked me to tell the doctor she needed a particular med for a chronic condition she had; due to her psych meds, it was imperative she get that med. I asked the doctor over the course of several days to please prescribe the med, to no avail. One night as I came back from dinner, the patient went into distress.

    I repeatedly paged the psych. on call, who did not answer my pages. I tried paging the intern and residents on call to get the patient transferred off our unit as she was clearly unstable and no longer appropriate to be on psych. After several hours, we finally got her transferred.

    Later that night during a procedure, she coded and died. I was devastated. At one point while I was trying to get her transferred, she grabbed my hand and said, "Please don't let me die."

    I was later told by risk mgmt. that the way I documented painted a clear picture of how hard I tried to get medical intervention for the patient, and that the fault for her death was on the doctors' shoulders.

    Her death was unnecessary. If she'd gotten the medication she needed, she probably would have walked out of the hospital, instead of going out in a hearse.

  • Sep 8

    Quote from canigraduate
    Point taken. I think it is silly to send out for someone to stand there, however, when the nurse could do it and be done with it in less than a minute. Much like I think it is not okay to call for an aide to place a bedpan when you are right there, or call housekeeping for water on the floor when you are right there and can get a towel in seconds, or call maintenance to switch the television's input source.

    I am biased about religious interventions and I know it. If someone asks me to do something spiritual for them and it doesn't violate the standard of care, I have no problem doing it. I am a little contemptuous of people who get all giddy and flustered and say they are uncomfortable. In my mind, it's about the patient, not about me. If you need me to spin three times and say "maguffin" before leaving the room, I'm okay with that.

    I know other nurses aren't as coldly practical as I am, so if it's something you are truly uncomfortable with, don't do it, but always have a backup plan in mind. Especially if it's the middle of the night and the on call chaplain is sitting vigil in ICU. Maybe you can find another staff member who doesn't mind praying and ask them for help.
    I think a hospital chaplain would do a lot more than just stand idly by pretending to pray with the patient. That is where their education and skills come into play when it comes to dealing with a patient in spiritual distress.

    I don't know what to say about your comment about being contemptuous toward a staff member who wouldn't feel comfortable praying with a patient. Call me crazy, but I thought we were supposed to support each other as fellow nurses.

  • Sep 8

    Quote from Jess6

    If nurses sometimes help ADLs, why do we have CNAs?
    OK...most of us can cook, so why have a dietary dept.? Most of us can clean, so why have housekeeping? Many are handy with making minor repairs...whoops, there goes all those nice people to help with plumbing problems. In fact, why have any support staff? We can just do it all.

    Hospital chaplains are trained to meet patients spiritual needs. I would hazard a guess that they are far more skilled at meeting these sensitive needs than the average nurse. Why should someone be forced into a situation that makes him/her uncomfortable when there are others in the hospital who have been hired to do this?

    I support nurses who don't feel comfortable doing this. As long as the patient has been referred to someone to handle his/her spiritual needs, then I think the nurse has met those needs. If a nurse wants to pray with a patient, I support that too.

    I went to a school of nursing that was in a Catholic hospital. Not once do I recall being told that it was our duty to pray with patients. What about nurses who are atheists? Should they pretend to be religious just for the sake of the patient? I don't think so...that's disingenuous.

  • Aug 31

    Quote from macawake
    This will probably come out as judgmental. I think it needs to be said though. You need to stop driving when you're in no condition to do so. You're scaring me.

    As former law enforcement who's been on the scene of too many accidents and a nurse who has worked in the ER it actually upsets me that you do this. Do you understand the havoc you can wreak doing 80 mph?

    Get up twenty or thirty minutes earlier in the morning so you have enough time to eat before you get behind the wheel. I wouldn't sugarcoat my message with a patient and I won't sugarcoat it with you either. You are gambling with both your own life and the life of others.

    I stopped driving when peripheral neuropathy from chemo made my feet and hands too numb to drive safely. I've even lost a good degree of proprioception, so finding the brake in an emergency would be difficult for me.

    I sympathize with the OP, but not to the extent that her desire to be a nurse puts other peoples' lives in danger. Think of how you'd feel if you harmed or killed someone driving while you were dizzy. To me it's no different than driving impaired.

    See if there's someone you can carpool with if you can't drive. Get up earlier so you have time to eat properly, rather than guzzling down your food. If nursing is what you want, you're going to have to make some lifestyle changes so you don't harm others.

  • Aug 31

    Quote from MariposaLPN
    Sadly, you just sounded like the Peds instructor, who, had I continued the story, commented the same thing. Unless you are a diabetic, you don't personally understand how quickly a normal blood sugar can drop. I had it recently happen that it was 84 and driving to get something fast to eat, ended up dropping to 68 just sitting at the drive thru line. Had to eat quickly in the parking lot. Yes, I know I should correct it and I had two waffles, thing is it takes longer for carbs to kick in than it does a simple sugar.

    Your instructor was wise. You shouldn't have even been caring for patients if your glucose was making you that altered.

    Someone who is diabetic should know better than to only allow herself 20 minutes to get dressed, brush teeth, then eat something. You don't need to be a diabetic to know that's a very unhealthy way to start your day.

    Lest you think I don't know what I'm talking about, I gave up my nursing career because the effects of my cancer treatment left me unsafe to care for patients. It was a painful decision, one that haunts me almost every day. But I would rather be the one dealing with it than cause irreparable harm to a patient.

  • Aug 22

    Quote from Buyer beware
    OP@CryandNurseOn, RN-I have to be honest and tell say that when I first saw this topic along with its anguished photo about the Highly Sensitve Person (HSP) personality type, I had a kindof a reactionary take on the subject matter. As in "buck up and and get
    moving" followed by "if you can't take the
    heat...." After all, why would anyone with this
    kind of intra-psychic hyperesthesia ever in
    their right mind what to be a nurse? Isn't it
    tantamount to person with a fear of snakes
    wanting to be a herpetologist?
    So to address the issue. In this field I have met personalities down through the years who were at various stages on the continuum of empathetic. Some very nice but warm and fuzzy, not so much. I believe the reason for this, and no excuses here, has to do with over coming the mental indecisiveness that has to do with keeping cognitive dissonance at bay.
    An extreme case but not too unusualoccurrance for trauma folks is having an accident victim being rushed iinto a bay followed by his tramatically amputed left foot chilled on ice in a zip lock.
    So what is the point. Simply this. We are all only human and subject to this or that revolting thing. But the necessity to be able to transcend the barriers to effective performance is essential to most areas in nursing.
    I think that was the point of the OP.

  • Aug 19

    Quote from Lisa, MA
    I have had several instances where a resident was completely unprepared or experienced with a situation. I've shown them how to give injections, how to figure out dosing, how to perform a throat culture, how to suture and even how to remove an impaction.

    I don't find it irritating so much as I find it disappointing that a "doc" would be sent out into the field without even so much as having seen the "basics". I remember the old time doctors using the phrase "See one, Do one, Teach one". But I don't think that these residents are even passing the "See one" stage before they are let loose on society! Sad really.
    Those are basic skills that can be easily learned. The fund of knowledge they have acquired in medical school, on the other hand, takes years and years of hard work and dedication. You can't equate the two. I couldn't care less if my doctor knows how to give a shot. I do care that he/she knows how to perform a skilled assessment, make an accurate diagnosis and prescribe appropriate treatment.

  • Aug 18

    Quote from Lisa, MA
    I have had several instances where a resident was completely unprepared or experienced with a situation. I've shown them how to give injections, how to figure out dosing, how to perform a throat culture, how to suture and even how to remove an impaction.

    I don't find it irritating so much as I find it disappointing that a "doc" would be sent out into the field without even so much as having seen the "basics". I remember the old time doctors using the phrase "See one, Do one, Teach one". But I don't think that these residents are even passing the "See one" stage before they are let loose on society! Sad really.
    Those are basic skills that can be easily learned. The fund of knowledge they have acquired in medical school, on the other hand, takes years and years of hard work and dedication. You can't equate the two. I couldn't care less if my doctor knows how to give a shot. I do care that he/she knows how to perform a skilled assessment, make an accurate diagnosis and prescribe appropriate treatment.

  • Aug 18

    Quote from eaus
    First of all, accept yourself as an imperfect person. Anyone who points a finger at you is a bully.
    When we start out as new nurses we make mistakes. Sometimes you don't know that you can't
    handle an assignment until something bad happens. Any nurse who says he or she has never made
    a mistake that affected a patient is a liar. My first year as a nurse was a nightmare. I cried quite a bit.
    But, there is always the nurse who points a finger and say things like "you should have done this or that"
    Yes, there are nurses like this wherever you work. Just do your best. Realize nurses, doctors, RTs-we are all prone to
    mistakes and some mistakes may be very serious. Learn from what you do or don't do. I am now at the end of
    my career. You become stronger and smarter as you go. If you like nursing stay with it, grow and learn. If every
    nurse quit because he or she made a serious mistake, there would be more of a shortage than we currently have.
    Forgive yourself and find a better place to work.

    I agree that anyone who tells you it was your fault a patient died is being a bully. Are there times when a situation could have been handled better? Yes, of course. This is where experienced nurses can share their knowledge and give you guidance on what to do the next time you are faced with that same scenario.

    ​Anyone who plays Monday morning quarterback here probably isn't worth listening to. They weren't there, didn't know the patient's history, and they don't know you.


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