Latest Likes For OCNRN63 - page 13

OCNRN63, RN 53,229 Views

Joined: Aug 27, '10; Posts: 7,236 (75% Liked) ; Likes: 27,964

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • Dec 3 '17

    Quote from TriciaJ
    I think a combination of catastrophic care plus health savings account would be the way to go. A catastrophic policy is usually pretty inexpensive but takes away the financial worry if something major happens. A health savings account would pay for the routine stuff and you would be using the money you otherwise would for high premiums.

    I have noticed that people absolutely hate the idea of using their own money for health care. I don't know why that is. We use our own money for everything else.
    Try paying for certain chemo out of pocket. I'm on a PARP-inhibitor that costs thousands of dollars a month. That's just for one med. If you can't work, how are you supposed to set money aside for health care, let alone pay for the health care you need?

  • Dec 3 '17

    Quote from TriciaJ
    I think a combination of catastrophic care plus health savings account would be the way to go. A catastrophic policy is usually pretty inexpensive but takes away the financial worry if something major happens. A health savings account would pay for the routine stuff and you would be using the money you otherwise would for high premiums.

    I have noticed that people absolutely hate the idea of using their own money for health care. I don't know why that is. We use our own money for everything else.
    Try paying for certain chemo out of pocket. I'm on a PARP-inhibitor that costs thousands of dollars a month. That's just for one med. If you can't work, how are you supposed to set money aside for health care, let alone pay for the health care you need?

  • Dec 2 '17

    Quote from llg
    I think that you might be right about linking the style of teaching with the fact that most of your instructors are Nurse Practitioners. For some people, "nurse" has become almost synonymous with "nurse practitioner." I think that you are making a valid point that should be taken seriously.

    The fact that you have done a few caths, started an IV, etc. is good. Nursing technical skills are important, too, and too many programs have failed to teach them well enough. However, there is no need to do 100 of them -- a few should be sufficient to introduce you to the skills and your employer should be able to give you additional practice with them after teaching you their particular protocols and procedure statndards. But you should be getting class material on the science behind these skills so that you understand the skills.

    So ... I think you raise a legitimate concern. In many schools, the pendulum has swung to far in the NP direction. Entry level programs should not be teaching from an NP perspective and/or teaching the NP role (unless they are entry-level NP programs). They should be teaching staff nurses skills from a staff nurse role perspective.
    Thank goodness. I was beginning to think I was the only one who thought the same way.

    OP, don't get too hung up on nothing experience with programming an IV pump/using other equipment. Many of those sorts of things are facility specific, so it's something you'll learn when you have your orientation as a new employee.

    Some of what you are saying does make sense. While a nurse needs to know above and beyond that of a doctor's handmaiden, it seems like education is getting away from some of the basics. For e.g, I was recently in the hospital and I had a student nurse one day. She said she needed to do patient teaching with me and I said "OK." Her patient teaching wound up being no more than leaving a printout of something at my bedside. She never went over it with me; just left it.

    I wonder if nursing programs feel that it's up to the hospitals/employers to teach new grads the staff nurse role.

  • Nov 30 '17

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Years ago, our nurse manager was asked to step down from her role. It may or may not have been due to her incompetence in the role, but then her failure to get along with her staff or her bosses, prescription drug abuse or entitled attitude may have been factors as well. To everyone's great surprise, she took a job as staff nurse on our unit. (I think I was MORE surprised that she GOT the job than that she took it.) As the holidays approached, we all watched anxiously to see which holidays PPP (Poor Pitiful Penny) would work. Her first act as nurse manager had been to announce that she was taking vacation for Christmas because it was absolutely ESSENTIAL to her well-being that she go home to Maine for Christmas. No one else would be allowed to request vacation from November 1 through January 15, and if anyone didn't like it they could become a nurse manager.

    The schedule came out, and PPP was scheduled to work Christmas. (She had requested ALL the holidays off, so no great surprise there.) The day she first clapped eyes on the schedule, she came looking for me and found me on lunch break in the break room. She sat down next to me, leaned over and said in a low voice designed not to carry to our lunching and chatting colleagues "You need to work Christmas for me because I have a life and you don't." (I think she meant she had a toddler and I was childless, but maybe I'm wrong."

    "Let me get this straight," I said loud enough to be heard over the break room chatter. "You just TOLD me I need to work Christmas for you because you have a life and I don't? No reeking WAY! You want a favor, you ask nicely for a favor. But you don't get to DEMAND anything from anyone. I cannot BELIEVE your gall!" PPP slunk away. The story got around and no one else would work Christmas for her, either, including the gal who wanted New Year's off so her boyfriend could propose. PPP ended up calling out sick on Christmas.

    She did get Mother's Day off because she paid someone to trade with her . . . probably the LAST trade she got because when a colleague's wife was going through chemotherapy, she was unwilling to switch with him because "I've already got my schedule written down and my whole life planned."
    I can't fathom that kind of selfishness. It shocks me that she ever got to a management position with that kind of attitude.

  • Nov 30 '17

    Quote from llg
    I think that you might be right about linking the style of teaching with the fact that most of your instructors are Nurse Practitioners. For some people, "nurse" has become almost synonymous with "nurse practitioner." I think that you are making a valid point that should be taken seriously.

    The fact that you have done a few caths, started an IV, etc. is good. Nursing technical skills are important, too, and too many programs have failed to teach them well enough. However, there is no need to do 100 of them -- a few should be sufficient to introduce you to the skills and your employer should be able to give you additional practice with them after teaching you their particular protocols and procedure statndards. But you should be getting class material on the science behind these skills so that you understand the skills.

    So ... I think you raise a legitimate concern. In many schools, the pendulum has swung to far in the NP direction. Entry level programs should not be teaching from an NP perspective and/or teaching the NP role (unless they are entry-level NP programs). They should be teaching staff nurses skills from a staff nurse role perspective.
    Thank goodness. I was beginning to think I was the only one who thought the same way.

    OP, don't get too hung up on nothing experience with programming an IV pump/using other equipment. Many of those sorts of things are facility specific, so it's something you'll learn when you have your orientation as a new employee.

    Some of what you are saying does make sense. While a nurse needs to know above and beyond that of a doctor's handmaiden, it seems like education is getting away from some of the basics. For e.g, I was recently in the hospital and I had a student nurse one day. She said she needed to do patient teaching with me and I said "OK." Her patient teaching wound up being no more than leaving a printout of something at my bedside. She never went over it with me; just left it.

    I wonder if nursing programs feel that it's up to the hospitals/employers to teach new grads the staff nurse role.

  • Nov 30 '17

    Quote from llg
    I think that you might be right about linking the style of teaching with the fact that most of your instructors are Nurse Practitioners. For some people, "nurse" has become almost synonymous with "nurse practitioner." I think that you are making a valid point that should be taken seriously.

    The fact that you have done a few caths, started an IV, etc. is good. Nursing technical skills are important, too, and too many programs have failed to teach them well enough. However, there is no need to do 100 of them -- a few should be sufficient to introduce you to the skills and your employer should be able to give you additional practice with them after teaching you their particular protocols and procedure statndards. But you should be getting class material on the science behind these skills so that you understand the skills.

    So ... I think you raise a legitimate concern. In many schools, the pendulum has swung to far in the NP direction. Entry level programs should not be teaching from an NP perspective and/or teaching the NP role (unless they are entry-level NP programs). They should be teaching staff nurses skills from a staff nurse role perspective.
    Thank goodness. I was beginning to think I was the only one who thought the same way.

    OP, don't get too hung up on nothing experience with programming an IV pump/using other equipment. Many of those sorts of things are facility specific, so it's something you'll learn when you have your orientation as a new employee.

    Some of what you are saying does make sense. While a nurse needs to know above and beyond that of a doctor's handmaiden, it seems like education is getting away from some of the basics. For e.g, I was recently in the hospital and I had a student nurse one day. She said she needed to do patient teaching with me and I said "OK." Her patient teaching wound up being no more than leaving a printout of something at my bedside. She never went over it with me; just left it.

    I wonder if nursing programs feel that it's up to the hospitals/employers to teach new grads the staff nurse role.

  • Nov 30 '17

    Quote from CMA-RN29
    Medical assistant can admin meds and vaccines. I know I messed up but I do have an associates degree for medical assisting. They don't have to verify anything. And I don't work in a Pcp office either. Basically the only difference between my RN and I is that an RN can give narcotics and start iv's.
    If you think that's the only difference between you and an RN...

    Never mind.

  • Nov 30 '17

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Years ago, our nurse manager was asked to step down from her role. It may or may not have been due to her incompetence in the role, but then her failure to get along with her staff or her bosses, prescription drug abuse or entitled attitude may have been factors as well. To everyone's great surprise, she took a job as staff nurse on our unit. (I think I was MORE surprised that she GOT the job than that she took it.) As the holidays approached, we all watched anxiously to see which holidays PPP (Poor Pitiful Penny) would work. Her first act as nurse manager had been to announce that she was taking vacation for Christmas because it was absolutely ESSENTIAL to her well-being that she go home to Maine for Christmas. No one else would be allowed to request vacation from November 1 through January 15, and if anyone didn't like it they could become a nurse manager.

    The schedule came out, and PPP was scheduled to work Christmas. (She had requested ALL the holidays off, so no great surprise there.) The day she first clapped eyes on the schedule, she came looking for me and found me on lunch break in the break room. She sat down next to me, leaned over and said in a low voice designed not to carry to our lunching and chatting colleagues "You need to work Christmas for me because I have a life and you don't." (I think she meant she had a toddler and I was childless, but maybe I'm wrong."

    "Let me get this straight," I said loud enough to be heard over the break room chatter. "You just TOLD me I need to work Christmas for you because you have a life and I don't? No reeking WAY! You want a favor, you ask nicely for a favor. But you don't get to DEMAND anything from anyone. I cannot BELIEVE your gall!" PPP slunk away. The story got around and no one else would work Christmas for her, either, including the gal who wanted New Year's off so her boyfriend could propose. PPP ended up calling out sick on Christmas.

    She did get Mother's Day off because she paid someone to trade with her . . . probably the LAST trade she got because when a colleague's wife was going through chemotherapy, she was unwilling to switch with him because "I've already got my schedule written down and my whole life planned."
    I can't fathom that kind of selfishness. It shocks me that she ever got to a management position with that kind of attitude.

  • Nov 30 '17

    Quote from llg
    I think that you might be right about linking the style of teaching with the fact that most of your instructors are Nurse Practitioners. For some people, "nurse" has become almost synonymous with "nurse practitioner." I think that you are making a valid point that should be taken seriously.

    The fact that you have done a few caths, started an IV, etc. is good. Nursing technical skills are important, too, and too many programs have failed to teach them well enough. However, there is no need to do 100 of them -- a few should be sufficient to introduce you to the skills and your employer should be able to give you additional practice with them after teaching you their particular protocols and procedure statndards. But you should be getting class material on the science behind these skills so that you understand the skills.

    So ... I think you raise a legitimate concern. In many schools, the pendulum has swung to far in the NP direction. Entry level programs should not be teaching from an NP perspective and/or teaching the NP role (unless they are entry-level NP programs). They should be teaching staff nurses skills from a staff nurse role perspective.
    Thank goodness. I was beginning to think I was the only one who thought the same way.

    OP, don't get too hung up on nothing experience with programming an IV pump/using other equipment. Many of those sorts of things are facility specific, so it's something you'll learn when you have your orientation as a new employee.

    Some of what you are saying does make sense. While a nurse needs to know above and beyond that of a doctor's handmaiden, it seems like education is getting away from some of the basics. For e.g, I was recently in the hospital and I had a student nurse one day. She said she needed to do patient teaching with me and I said "OK." Her patient teaching wound up being no more than leaving a printout of something at my bedside. She never went over it with me; just left it.

    I wonder if nursing programs feel that it's up to the hospitals/employers to teach new grads the staff nurse role.

  • Nov 29 '17

    Quote from llg
    I think that you might be right about linking the style of teaching with the fact that most of your instructors are Nurse Practitioners. For some people, "nurse" has become almost synonymous with "nurse practitioner." I think that you are making a valid point that should be taken seriously.

    The fact that you have done a few caths, started an IV, etc. is good. Nursing technical skills are important, too, and too many programs have failed to teach them well enough. However, there is no need to do 100 of them -- a few should be sufficient to introduce you to the skills and your employer should be able to give you additional practice with them after teaching you their particular protocols and procedure statndards. But you should be getting class material on the science behind these skills so that you understand the skills.

    So ... I think you raise a legitimate concern. In many schools, the pendulum has swung to far in the NP direction. Entry level programs should not be teaching from an NP perspective and/or teaching the NP role (unless they are entry-level NP programs). They should be teaching staff nurses skills from a staff nurse role perspective.
    Thank goodness. I was beginning to think I was the only one who thought the same way.

    OP, don't get too hung up on nothing experience with programming an IV pump/using other equipment. Many of those sorts of things are facility specific, so it's something you'll learn when you have your orientation as a new employee.

    Some of what you are saying does make sense. While a nurse needs to know above and beyond that of a doctor's handmaiden, it seems like education is getting away from some of the basics. For e.g, I was recently in the hospital and I had a student nurse one day. She said she needed to do patient teaching with me and I said "OK." Her patient teaching wound up being no more than leaving a printout of something at my bedside. She never went over it with me; just left it.

    I wonder if nursing programs feel that it's up to the hospitals/employers to teach new grads the staff nurse role.

  • Nov 29 '17

    Quote from llg
    I think that you might be right about linking the style of teaching with the fact that most of your instructors are Nurse Practitioners. For some people, "nurse" has become almost synonymous with "nurse practitioner." I think that you are making a valid point that should be taken seriously.

    The fact that you have done a few caths, started an IV, etc. is good. Nursing technical skills are important, too, and too many programs have failed to teach them well enough. However, there is no need to do 100 of them -- a few should be sufficient to introduce you to the skills and your employer should be able to give you additional practice with them after teaching you their particular protocols and procedure statndards. But you should be getting class material on the science behind these skills so that you understand the skills.

    So ... I think you raise a legitimate concern. In many schools, the pendulum has swung to far in the NP direction. Entry level programs should not be teaching from an NP perspective and/or teaching the NP role (unless they are entry-level NP programs). They should be teaching staff nurses skills from a staff nurse role perspective.
    Thank goodness. I was beginning to think I was the only one who thought the same way.

    OP, don't get too hung up on nothing experience with programming an IV pump/using other equipment. Many of those sorts of things are facility specific, so it's something you'll learn when you have your orientation as a new employee.

    Some of what you are saying does make sense. While a nurse needs to know above and beyond that of a doctor's handmaiden, it seems like education is getting away from some of the basics. For e.g, I was recently in the hospital and I had a student nurse one day. She said she needed to do patient teaching with me and I said "OK." Her patient teaching wound up being no more than leaving a printout of something at my bedside. She never went over it with me; just left it.

    I wonder if nursing programs feel that it's up to the hospitals/employers to teach new grads the staff nurse role.

  • Nov 28 '17

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Years ago, our nurse manager was asked to step down from her role. It may or may not have been due to her incompetence in the role, but then her failure to get along with her staff or her bosses, prescription drug abuse or entitled attitude may have been factors as well. To everyone's great surprise, she took a job as staff nurse on our unit. (I think I was MORE surprised that she GOT the job than that she took it.) As the holidays approached, we all watched anxiously to see which holidays PPP (Poor Pitiful Penny) would work. Her first act as nurse manager had been to announce that she was taking vacation for Christmas because it was absolutely ESSENTIAL to her well-being that she go home to Maine for Christmas. No one else would be allowed to request vacation from November 1 through January 15, and if anyone didn't like it they could become a nurse manager.

    The schedule came out, and PPP was scheduled to work Christmas. (She had requested ALL the holidays off, so no great surprise there.) The day she first clapped eyes on the schedule, she came looking for me and found me on lunch break in the break room. She sat down next to me, leaned over and said in a low voice designed not to carry to our lunching and chatting colleagues "You need to work Christmas for me because I have a life and you don't." (I think she meant she had a toddler and I was childless, but maybe I'm wrong."

    "Let me get this straight," I said loud enough to be heard over the break room chatter. "You just TOLD me I need to work Christmas for you because you have a life and I don't? No reeking WAY! You want a favor, you ask nicely for a favor. But you don't get to DEMAND anything from anyone. I cannot BELIEVE your gall!" PPP slunk away. The story got around and no one else would work Christmas for her, either, including the gal who wanted New Year's off so her boyfriend could propose. PPP ended up calling out sick on Christmas.

    She did get Mother's Day off because she paid someone to trade with her . . . probably the LAST trade she got because when a colleague's wife was going through chemotherapy, she was unwilling to switch with him because "I've already got my schedule written down and my whole life planned."
    I can't fathom that kind of selfishness. It shocks me that she ever got to a management position with that kind of attitude.

  • Nov 28 '17

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Years ago, our nurse manager was asked to step down from her role. It may or may not have been due to her incompetence in the role, but then her failure to get along with her staff or her bosses, prescription drug abuse or entitled attitude may have been factors as well. To everyone's great surprise, she took a job as staff nurse on our unit. (I think I was MORE surprised that she GOT the job than that she took it.) As the holidays approached, we all watched anxiously to see which holidays PPP (Poor Pitiful Penny) would work. Her first act as nurse manager had been to announce that she was taking vacation for Christmas because it was absolutely ESSENTIAL to her well-being that she go home to Maine for Christmas. No one else would be allowed to request vacation from November 1 through January 15, and if anyone didn't like it they could become a nurse manager.

    The schedule came out, and PPP was scheduled to work Christmas. (She had requested ALL the holidays off, so no great surprise there.) The day she first clapped eyes on the schedule, she came looking for me and found me on lunch break in the break room. She sat down next to me, leaned over and said in a low voice designed not to carry to our lunching and chatting colleagues "You need to work Christmas for me because I have a life and you don't." (I think she meant she had a toddler and I was childless, but maybe I'm wrong."

    "Let me get this straight," I said loud enough to be heard over the break room chatter. "You just TOLD me I need to work Christmas for you because you have a life and I don't? No reeking WAY! You want a favor, you ask nicely for a favor. But you don't get to DEMAND anything from anyone. I cannot BELIEVE your gall!" PPP slunk away. The story got around and no one else would work Christmas for her, either, including the gal who wanted New Year's off so her boyfriend could propose. PPP ended up calling out sick on Christmas.

    She did get Mother's Day off because she paid someone to trade with her . . . probably the LAST trade she got because when a colleague's wife was going through chemotherapy, she was unwilling to switch with him because "I've already got my schedule written down and my whole life planned."
    I can't fathom that kind of selfishness. It shocks me that she ever got to a management position with that kind of attitude.

  • Nov 26 '17
    From Fiona59 In MA

    Quote from klone
    I will generally point at her and yell "LIAR LIAR PANTS ON FIRE!!" and then I will rip her name tag off her scrub top and throw it on the ground and stomp on it really hard, grinding the heel of my Dansko into it until it's just a pile of sharp shards of plastic. Then I will grab one of the shards of plastic and take her Littmann stethoscope from around her neck and then cut the rubber tubing into pieces.
    This post deserves to go in an AN "Hall of Fame."

  • Nov 25 '17

    Quote from CMA-RN29
    Medical assistant can admin meds and vaccines. I know I messed up but I do have an associates degree for medical assisting. They don't have to verify anything. And I don't work in a Pcp office either. Basically the only difference between my RN and I is that an RN can give narcotics and start iv's.
    If you think that's the only difference between you and an RN...

    Never mind.


close