Content That ThePrincessBride Likes - page 4

ThePrincessBride, BSN, RN 53,303 Views

Joined: Jun 13, '10; Posts: 2,257 (62% Liked) ; Likes: 6,524
Specialty: 3 year(s) of experience in Med-Surg, NICU

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  • Feb 4

    3% is a princely sum compared to what we've gotten at my LTC/rehab facility. We got 1% for a few years, 2% one year, and zero last year. That's only partly why I just got another job with a whopping increase - no, not huge bucks, but compared to what I'm getting now...

  • Feb 4

    Your raise is much better than mine. But I'm happy doing the job that I am doing. Maybe one day down the road I'll be looking for something new but money isn't my greatest need right now. Most of us have been getting around 1% every year and we're a big company. I've been advocating for things like retention bonuses or stacking an extra 1 or 2 percent on the annual raise just to keep our nurses. Turnover is crazy! I've seen some of the most amazing nurses leave due to poor treatment from management and low pay. Sad really.

  • Feb 4

    I am an LPN in Canada, and yes I've had gotten a raises since starting 2 years ago (not a whole lot but I'm still grateful). The union negotiates our pay scale based on either hours worked (if you're part time like me) or years since starting (if you're full time).

  • Feb 4

    In 35 years of working, both nursing and not, I have found that raises barely match the cost of living.

    Unless you are in a union with steps, and even then, the raises are quite minuscule after you pay the tax on the increase.

    If you want an actual raise that makes any difference, you have to do something really different.

    Usually go back to school.

    My experience only.

  • Feb 4

    Some may be dissatisfied with their union, but I think ours does a pretty good job. I think there is some data that shows the unions where I work help actually bring the pay UP for nurses in our tri-state area.

    ADN or diploma nurses at our facility start around $31 and BSNs start at almost $33.

    Or you could be like this guy with insane work commute:
    This nurse commutes 2,6 miles to work in Oakland. Is he nuts? - SFGate

  • Feb 4

    I'm in a Union and work right next door to our giant provider in Pittsburgh. I have better benefits and make much more money than the folks there plus firing or disciplining me is not a simple matter at all

  • Feb 4

    Quote from Accolay
    Some may be dissatisfied with their union, but I think ours does a pretty good job. I think there is some data that shows the unions where I work help actually bring the pay UP for nurses in our tri-state area.

    ADN or diploma nurses at our facility start around $31 and BSNs start at almost $33.

    Or you could be like this guy with insane work commute:
    This nurse commutes 2,6 miles to work in Oakland. Is he nuts? - SFGate
    Meanwhile he's passing California and Pennsylvania state taxes. Yikes.

  • Feb 4

    WOW what a topical article for me personally. I must say I'm thinking about doing the exact same thing but only for three years. I work for the VA and we get locality pay based on where we work. Our pensions are calculated on our highest earning three years. This being the case for my last three years of work I'm looking at our highest paying facilities as it could make a huge impact on my pension and hopefully that benefit will last for many years

  • Feb 4

    Most hospitals, LTCs and other facilities are unionized in my province by the Ontario Nurses Association. This means most facilities no matter where you go in Ontario will pay you the same. The raises work like this'll :

    After one year: 0.13 cent raise (wow!)
    After 2 years: 0.54 cent raise
    3 years: $1.42 raise
    4 years: $1.67 raise
    5 years: $2.04 raise
    6 years: $2.25 raise
    7 years: $2.06 raise
    8 years: $3.01 raise

    ....and then you get nothing for 17 years and at the 25 year mark you get a whopping $0.80 cent raise! Not sure who came up with this lol

  • Feb 4

    Quote from ThePrincessBride

    How much does private insurance cost you, if I may ask? Is it ridiculously expensive?
    That's a bummer. Maybe you could switch to a different hosoital, in the same specialty, as a per diem making a higher hourly rate.

    My monthly premium for insurance is about $350. I make $600 each per diem shift I work so it's easily affordable. That includes medical, dental, and vision.

    I asked the insurance rep. what most young, healthy mid twenties age groups choose, and was informed- minimal coverage, totaling about $225/month. But I wanted better coverage with a lower deductible so I chose a different plan.

    You should investigate and see if it's a good fit for you!

  • Feb 4

    3-5% is pretty standard annual raise for my area. Only time anyone got more than that was when they were re-evaluating everyone's pay to be more competitive and we all got a good chunk that year but really it just brought us up to what the competing employers pay their employees across town.

    Don't focus so much on the lack of increase unless you are in dire need and need a large increase in pay. A better work environment and schedule is worth not making the job jump in my eyes but that's just my priorities. You have to decide what your own priorities are.

  • Feb 2
    By llg In Raises

    I've been in this business for 40 years ... and my opinion is that work environment, work happiness, good co-workers, good schedule, etc. ... outweigh small-to-moderate pay differences. If I am generally satisfied with my job, I will sacrifice a bit in pay. Being miserable is just not worth a few bucks to me. I have learned to let that principle guide my decisions on such things. At this point in life, you couldn't pay me enough to be willing to miserable all the time.

    I haven't gotten a raise in 5 or 6 years because I am at the top of the payscale for my job -- and my employer never gives a "cost-of-living" raise. They usually give yearly raises for seniority though -- until you reach the top. So essentially, my buying power has decreased steadily over the past few years. I stay because I am reasonably happy in my work, my schedule, and with my co-workers. I might make more money elsewhere, but I would not be as happy in my job. And I am too close to retirement to want to start over somewhere else.

  • Feb 2

    Go per diem and buy private insurance if you are single and no dependents.

    I did that this year and make significantly more than when I was full time. I paid off all my student and car loans with the extra $.

    I work 2 per diem gigs equaling near full time hours.

    You'll just have to decide if it's worth it to lose 401k benefits, PTO, etc.

    But on the plus side, complete shedule felxibilty, and very minimal holiday requirements. Just an idea.

  • Feb 2

    It is well known in nursing that the only way to get a decent raise is to change jobs every couple of years. Whether or not we think it is a "fair" raise for you really doesn't matter. We don't have to live on it. You do. Right?

    Don't count out changing employers on assumptions. Look at the openings on websites and apply to any that appeal to you.

  • Feb 2

    Go agency or short-term travel contracts. Or pick something you're good at and needed as a skill and throw nets around skilled facilities. SNFs pay good money for sticking IVs or changing wound vacs. You

    Waiting for your employer to get your "compensation" where it rightfully should be will take till you retire and then infinity. So, if you like the place you work in otherwise and $$$ is only one question, get creative with your spare time.


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