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Davey Do, RN Guide 68,407 Views

Joined: Jun 11, '10; Posts: 10,277 (89% Liked) ; Likes: 42,535

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  • 1:50 pm
  • 7:41 am

    Quote from verene
    Way to go DavyDo! Also an important reminder that documentation does actually matter.
    Yesindeedee, verene!

    It wasn't like I did any heroic measures, I merely did my job and that was to document my assessment like any other prudent nurse would do.

    But it felt good to be recognized by the Higher Ups for something other than not doing right in their eyes.

    Some time shortly after the situation and subsequent investigation occurred, a certain nurse was suspended for lack of documentation

    Recently, within the past few months, I posted a vent with a cartoon about some nurses who came in typically 10 minutes late for their shift and sat in the nurses station for about 20 minutes doing nothing. During that time, my work wife Eleanor and I worked the floor, providing care for the patients. I was ticked with their behavior and told them so. I got a bunch of guff thrown back at me, didn't argue with them, just turned away and said, "I'm out of here!"

    Here's an updated cartoon of the situation:

    3-slugs-png

    "What comes around, goes around."

  • 7:40 am

    There's always talk about lawsuits against the hospital after we hear of a situation where a patient's condition worsened and care was not properly rendered and/or documented.

    Such was the talk of a patient I admitted some time ago. All I heard were stories from other staff members and no administrative official ever said anything to me about the patient, so I wasn't concerned.

    This morning I had to attend a mandatory inservice on safety which primarily focused on duties and documentation having to do with staff assignments, patient rounds, observation levels, restraints, and fall risks.

    Again, this patient that I had admitted was discussed. I don't remember exactly what was said, but it had to do with the patient's worsened condition and staff's intervention and documentation.

    At the end of the inservice, the second-in-command of the psych division, my boss's boss, approached me and said, "There's something I've been meaning to tell you" and she again referred to the aforementioned patient.

    Her exact words were: "Your documentation saved our ***!"

    I felt pretty good about that and wanted to share it with you all.

  • 4:19 am

    Did you ever notice that people (allnurses members, e.g.) will write "ect" when they mean "etc"?

    Et cetera, abbreviated to etc. is a Latin expression used in English to mean "and other things", or "and so forth". Translated literally from Latin, et means 'and', while cetera means 'the rest'; thus the expression means 'and the rest (of such things)'.

    Whereas "ect"...

    Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT), often referred to as shock treatment, is a psychiatric treatment in which seizures are electrically induced in patients to provide relief from mental disorders.

    Big difference.

  • 4:15 am

    I wonder if the drug company that makes Drain-No also makes other controlled substances?

  • Dec 14

    Quote from OldDude
    Ice Pack, STAT! Reassess when cooler hands prevail.
    Oh shucks, OldDude!

    While you were posting, I came up with a possible solution:

    Attachment 28119

    I'll get back to you.

  • Dec 14

    Quote from NurseSpeedy
    I remember a doctor that worked on a rehab unit.

    I saw him put on the accent any time there was an issue for one of his patients. One minute, no accent, the next minute, super strong German accent.
    I worked with a Pakistani psychiatrist, Dr. N, who had a very thick accent and he who could do just about the opposite.

    For example, one time he was telling me about a conversation with a patient and when he spoke the patient's part of the conversation, it was without an accent!

    dr-n-jpg

    This is and edited caricature of Dr. N from a 2003 journal.

    Dr. N had great hair!

  • Dec 14

    Quote from NurseSpeedy
    I worked at a facility that had an involuntary psych unit. I worked 3-11 at the time and was on the medical floor that was adjacent to the psych wing. There was this one very flamboyant psychiatrist that would always start his rounds around 11:30pm or so.
    Quote from TriciaJ
    So the psychiatrist breezes in at midnight and wakes everyone up? I would KILL him.
    Oh- don't say that, TriciaJ. A homicidal statement is criteria for an involuntary psych admission!

    On the flip side of things, back in 2006, before Wrongway Regional Medical Center had hospitalists and NPs to oversee medical concerns for psych patients, we had an internist, Dr. A, who would come in early on the MN shift to to assess and prescribe treatment.

    Here's a caricature I did of Dr. A back in '06:

    Attachment 28113

    I remember one time on the MN shift Dr. A was assessing a patient who was complaining of severe abdominal discomfort and he asked me if I could hear I bowel sounds. I listened for a couple of minutes and said yes, I could hear them in all four quadrants. He said, "I'm going to send her down for some tests anyway".

    I don't remember what the tests were- maybe an abdominal series, KUB or something- but when the patient returned, she was right as rain, making up her bed and humming a little tune.

    Sometimes, a little attention (and some unnecessary tests) goes a long way!

  • Dec 14

    I wonder: Do we know of any Snowflakes who matured and seasoned and eventually became COBs?

    Were we ever Snowflakes?

    Did we mature and season like Lucy's January snowflakes?

    Attachment 27968

  • Dec 14

    Quote from OldDude
    Ice Pack, STAT! Reassess when cooler hands prevail.
    Attachment 28121

  • Dec 14

    Quote from Night__Owl
    they have to "sedate" Will. Will's mother does this by plunging an IM needle ALL THE WAY INTO HIS AC.
    im-ante-png

  • Dec 14
  • Dec 14

    Quote from Night__Owl
    they have to "sedate" Will. Will's mother does this by plunging an IM needle ALL THE WAY INTO HIS AC.
    im-ante-png

  • Dec 14

    There's always talk about lawsuits against the hospital after we hear of a situation where a patient's condition worsened and care was not properly rendered and/or documented.

    Such was the talk of a patient I admitted some time ago. All I heard were stories from other staff members and no administrative official ever said anything to me about the patient, so I wasn't concerned.

    This morning I had to attend a mandatory inservice on safety which primarily focused on duties and documentation having to do with staff assignments, patient rounds, observation levels, restraints, and fall risks.

    Again, this patient that I had admitted was discussed. I don't remember exactly what was said, but it had to do with the patient's worsened condition and staff's intervention and documentation.

    At the end of the inservice, the second-in-command of the psych division, my boss's boss, approached me and said, "There's something I've been meaning to tell you" and she again referred to the aforementioned patient.

    Her exact words were: "Your documentation saved our ***!"

    I felt pretty good about that and wanted to share it with you all.

  • Dec 14

    Quote from JBMmom
    We went out for a lunch one day and it was raining. I happened to pass him driving along and he had an umbrella open, in his car, blocking the driver's side window and part of the windshield. When we arrived at lunch I asked what happened with his umbrella. He responded that there was a crack in his car frame that allowed water to get in, so he always drove like that when it rained. I found it hilarious that my boss making $200K+ had a crappier car than me, making FAR less.
    Attachment 28087


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