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Kooky Korky 31,249 Views

Joined: Feb 12, '10; Posts: 3,920 (53% Liked) ; Likes: 5,388

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  • 10:33 pm

    LOL. Yes, it would be my practice to 'run and tell' on any healthcare worker I observed cussing at and/or yanking on a patient inappropriately. To do otherwise would be negligent. And FYI, it would not be a co-worker's position to discuss training, education, etc. That is a duty of management.

  • 10:31 pm

    Personally, I think the ER doc behaved like a complete freak. She was dismissive, combative, argumentative, rude, imperious, etc. I think the way she repeatedly yanked on the young man's arm could be construed as assault. Her mannerisms and behaviors didn't come across as medicinal or therapeutic in any way. I didn't find the young man or his father to be disrespectful at all. She wasn't listening to them. Also, it seems peculiar to me that a college student accompanied to ER by his father would be presumed to be a drug seeker?? Presuming the ER doctor was in 'burn out' is nothing more to me than a weak justification for appalling behavior by a healthcare provider. I don't care how valuable you 'think' your services as a healthcare worker are - if you behave savagely to other people, you're truly in the wrong profession. Accepting that type of disrespectful behavior would be setting a very low bar for acceptable conduct. Worst case scenario, IF the patient had been a drug seeker - the doctor's behavior was still 100% incorrect. Just my opinion and, as an RN who really believes in patient advocacy - I don't care what haters think and, would have reported her before the video ever hit the internet.

  • 10:17 pm

    Unfortunate. May be burnout, maybe not. There are posts here not infrequently that represent the same basic mistake in thinking, which is failure to separate self and other.

    Lots of other people would've been able to appropriately dispo this in 5-10 minutes while remaining perfectly pleasant.

  • 9:01 pm

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    What are they doing instead of getting to the patient?
    I would be in a patient ls room well into changing them then have to speed up to finish or stop completely

    The nurse's will just calmly be sorting meds and be right next to the residents room. I mean I know you have to pass out meds but is it really worth letting a resident fall -_-

  • Jun 18

    There was an older student in my class, who had one goal to work with one specific group of people; and everything had to be about that group. Read all the books before the semester started and was ready to answer absolutely everything, with how it affected only her interests. Wasn't always right either. Useless in clinical and had to repeat a semester. So, yeah, there are people the rest of the class resents for monopolizing every conversation. Does this sound like you? Not that I pick up from what you said But people do react to someone who seems to "know it all". My advice, just scale back the classroom responses.

    On the other hand, my daughter was in a private high school after having homeschooled everything before that. She read the assignments, and answered evverything correctly; until the teacher told her to stop and let others answer. No one else ever did. Teacher literally would stand there trying to get a response, and coming back to my daughter who refused to answer anymore. When she got back from a trip (we did her schooling online while she was gone), the rest of the students pulled her aside and said "don't answer anything! we've gotten good at distracting (the teacher) so she never finishes so we don't get homework". School closed the next year.

    Moral of the story is, keep quiet and see if anyone else actually has answers. Lets them showcase themselves, or flounder. Either one works!

  • Jun 18

    And for goodness' sake, go see your doctor if you have any ongoing medical concerns.

  • Jun 18

    Sour Lemon said it all. When placed in compromising situations, many of us put our feet in our mouths by giving too much information. At any rate, you must correct the situation and always consider a target to be firmly on your job's back at this facility. You will always be remembered as the nurse who "fell asleep".

  • Jun 18

    It would have been better for you and less concerning for your boss if you'd just apologized and promised it wouldn't happen again. Suggesting that you might have a medical condition that makes it impossible to stay awake at work did not do you any favors. That's a potentially unsafe situation and a huge liability concern for any employer.

  • Jun 18

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    When people need treatment for pain chronically or for perhaps a terribly destructive accident (lots of fractures, serious burns, and the like), do their pain meds automatically stop after 60 or 90 days - or some other specified time, no matter how much they might still need pain treatment. For example, they have physical therapy but can hardly bear the agonizing pain it causes and the doctor won't order adequate pain meds for a long enough time.
    I know there are other approaches to pain management - TENS, intra-spinal stimulators, water therapy, manipulation under anesthesia, chiropractic, etc., but a lot of "Rehab" places offer nothing like these latter modes of care. Patients are told to grit their teeth and focus on the starts, the rainbow, whatever.
    The pain meds that you are speaking of such as controlled drugs schedule II, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine Dilaudid, I believe the prescription is only good for 30 days (no refills) or a short amount time, then there must be a new prescription. Other drugs such as Tylenol #3, there may be refills. Physical therapy seems contraindicated when there's severe pain. That seems a bit much for an MD not to address severe pain, most of the docs that I deal with do address this issue.

  • Jun 18

    As a chronic pain sufferer I can tell you that after it became clear that the general practice doctor could not "Cure" my pain I was referred to a Pain Management Specialist or PMS. I do ton's of holistic things and have a ten's unit at home. I also see an acupuncturist who is also an herbalist. I do not take any herb without first talking to my PMS as some herbs can be just as dangerous as Tylenol for the liver. I do take opiods responsibly and by prescription. I am required to actually check in with my pain management specialist every 90 days. I must say Summer is the best time of year because I am more active. But I will be having some surgery this Summer so we'll see how that goes.


    Hppy

  • Jun 18

    Quote from RNperdiem
    I am fighting a temporary bout of absolute exhaustion too. I first read your post waiting for my son's neurosurgeon to tell me how the operation went. Big stress = big exhaustion. I force myself to eat regular nutritious meals, get outside every day, try to sleep well, and make good use of people who want to help.
    RNperdiem,

    I hope your son is doing well and recovering with flying colors. Sending best wishes!

  • Jun 18

    I am fighting a temporary bout of absolute exhaustion too. I first read your post waiting for my son's neurosurgeon to tell me how the operation went. Big stress = big exhaustion. I force myself to eat regular nutritious meals, get outside every day, try to sleep well, and make good use of people who want to help.

  • Jun 18

    Quote from Davey Do
    I have been in a trough for the past two or three months, Lilia. ...

    Then, all of a sudden, the cloud lifted. I had an epiphany, an illuminating revelation, and I knew everything was going to be all right.
    I've been in a similar funk lately then had a horrible URI get ahold of me. So now I'm figuring I was prodromal. Glad you are feeling better DD

    To the OP: why are you exhausted, and is it mental, physical or both?

  • Jun 18

    Quote from Lilia777
    just wanted to ask anyone who is/has been struggling with absolute exhaustion
    I have been in a trough for the past two or three months, Lilia.

    I've had my biorhythmic peaks and valleys throughout my life, but recently I've been suffering from a real deep-rutted blue funk. I've experienced anhedonia, impatience, and a general distaste for life in general. Nothing was really wrong in my life, but I could find something wrong with everything.

    I've practiced a daily routine of exercise, art, spiritual endeavors, playing with humorous ideas and generally attempting to live a healthy lifestyle for years now. These practices buoyed me on, but I just felt spent.

    Then, all of a sudden, the cloud lifted. I had an epiphany, an illuminating revelation, and I knew everything was going to be all right.

    My advice to you echoes what the others have said, along with this: Find your bliss, that which nourishes and rejuvenates you, and pursue it with all your heart.

    It don't come easy, for some days we have to work at putting one foot in front of the other, take it a day, or a shift or an hour or a minute at a time just to get through. But get through, you will, if you make your emotional and mental health paramount.

    Good luck, and the very best to you, Lilia!

  • Jun 17

    Your work is heart wrenching and I imagine that you have a beautiful strong patched up heart. Thank you for sharing a piece of it.


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