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Kooky Korky 32,243 Views

Joined: Feb 12, '10; Posts: 4,102 (54% Liked) ; Likes: 5,741

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  • 7:38 am

    Quote from TNT_RN09
    Well when you've already paid for hotels & booked flights months in advance to then find out 30 days before your vacation is denied, i see why many would quit
    But you need to get approval before making those expenditures. And it should be in writing for your protection.

  • 12:42 am

    Quote from JBudd
    I was out for around 7 months, with surgery and cancer treatments, I used my accumulated leave the entire time, although towards the end I was only submitting the minimum number of hours to keep my health insurance active.


    They tried to tell me I hadn't worked enough hours in the previous year to qualify for FMLA. Short something like, 40 hours. I asked, did you count the 48 hours I just did a few months before on jury duty? Because the hospital paid me for it! (union contract). I did not willing miss those hours, I was required to by law. They tried to say no, but I raised a stink as did my director and manager, and HR gave in.
    Most HR folk should be put adrift in a small boat in the middle of a hurricane.

    So glad you won.

  • Sep 23

    Quote from JBudd
    I was out for around 7 months, with surgery and cancer treatments, I used my accumulated leave the entire time, although towards the end I was only submitting the minimum number of hours to keep my health insurance active.


    They tried to tell me I hadn't worked enough hours in the previous year to qualify for FMLA. Short something like, 40 hours. I asked, did you count the 48 hours I just did a few months before on jury duty? Because the hospital paid me for it! (union contract). I did not willing miss those hours, I was required to by law. They tried to say no, but I raised a stink as did my director and manager, and HR gave in.
    Most HR folk should be put adrift in a small boat in the middle of a hurricane.

    So glad you won.

  • Sep 23

    Quote from T-Bird78
    I was on intermittent FMLA during my last pregnancy. I'd been in the ER 3 times, hospitalized for 4 days the first time, overnight another time, and was on home health services (IV hydration and getting stabilized on the subcu pump) for 3 weeks, so my HR automatically initiated intermittent FMLA. I missed 3 nonconsecutive weeks in one month after sporadic absences the month prior. When I did start back to work, still wearing my pump, I went 3 months without missing a day or even calling out sick. I still got a low score on my annual review for attendance and dependability, which made me mad because it was completely out of my control. By the time I reached 36 weeks I'd been in the L&D 3 times with premature contractions and was finally put on bed rest. My FMLA ran out when my son was 6 weeks old, my short-term disability ran out then, and I was physically exhausted so I chose to not return at that time. The thing to remember with FMLA, whether it's intermittent or continuous, is you don't get paid while on it! Working in asthma/allergy, I've had to fill out intermittent FMLA forms so pts can leave work one hour a week to get their allergy shots, or for severe asthma pts with frequent flare-ups.
    The boss who gave you a low score should be horse-shipped. And have some sickness of her own just for good measure. I hope you appealed the score.

  • Sep 23

    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Old nurse here. I've been through serious back injuries, joint replacements and had cancer three times. There were some colleagues that were very kind and helpful to me knowing that even when I LOOKED healthy, I was in incredible pain most of the time. And then there were those who weren't. Interestingly, the ones who weren't happened to be the same ones who regarded pregnancy, and nursing as disabilitie and required hour-long breaks three times a shift to pump.
    That's a dang lot of pumping. Did she have triplets? Nurse them til college age? Just kidding on the latter.

  • Sep 23

    Quote from Wuzzie
    I think this may be the crux of the issue. We have a staff member who got intermittent FMLA for headaches and when her MD refused to extend it she went to another who gave her IFMLA for hip pain. She used both liberally which left us scrambling. When she did show up she would disappear and then reappear complaining of excruciating pain requiring her to leave early. Then she got pregnant and she wasn't "allowed" to do anything but desk work from 4 weeks on. Then that was too much for her. Now she's on maternity leave but we got wind that she's going to be on IFMLA for post-partum depression. She has not worked since April and we cannot replace her. She's essentially holding us hostage. Needless to say people were not all that thrilled to pick up her slack when she actually showed up for work and her being pregnant didn't soften the blow. I guess what I'm saying is we all have our limits of sympathy/empathy and without knowing the entire back-story of the OP's situation I'm going to reserve judgment.
    Doesn't FMLA let the job be filled and you give an equivalent one to the returning FMLA user?

  • Sep 23

    Quote from TNT_RN09
    Well when you've already paid for hotels & booked flights months in advance to then find out 30 days before your vacation is denied, i see why many would quit
    But you need to get approval before making those expenditures. And it should be in writing for your protection.

  • Sep 22

    Quote from TNT_RN09
    Well when you've already paid for hotels & booked flights months in advance to then find out 30 days before your vacation is denied, i see why many would quit
    But you need to get approval before making those expenditures. And it should be in writing for your protection.

  • Sep 22

    Quote from TNT_RN09
    Well when you've already paid for hotels & booked flights months in advance to then find out 30 days before your vacation is denied, i see why many would quit
    But you need to get approval before making those expenditures. And it should be in writing for your protection.

  • Sep 22

    Some patients and visitors are problematic.

    You still need to learn to cope with them. Take the recommended class.

    And you will find difficult wherever you are, at the bedside or not.

    Learn and grow. Take the class.

    One big step - realize that you don't have to reply to every word or gesture or whatever they say or do.

    Also - you can say "I can help you".

    Or, if possible without messing up your schedule, say "I'll be back in a bit. I just remembered something I have to do right now". And leave.

    Just long enough to get yourself calmed down and feeling better towards them.

    That's another thing. Remember that, on at least some level, the people are sick.

    Take the class and learn some coping skills. Life will go better for you.

  • Sep 22

    Quote from not.done.yet
    A brave article that brings to light something that most would rather pretend isn't happening. Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately?) the current political and social climate has thrust the truth of it out into the spotlight and it is very difficult to look away from. It is also very difficult to look directly at. How many of us would like to believe we do not have any social bias? How many of us decry the idea of privilege, finding it far more comfortable to believe the playing field is level, despite all evidence to the contrary?

    Keep singing your truth, OP. We all need to hear it, think about it and let it and stories like it change us from the inside out. I am torn up about what is happening in our country and will do what I can to be part of the solution. Sometimes that looks like listening, accepting, thinking and giving credence. Your truth is yours and someone's unwillingness to entertain the idea that it isn't true has less to do with you than it does them. Summary dismissal is just too easy and almost never the right response and it is brave of you to subject yourself to it in the name of putting light on a subject so many prefer to ignore.
    And sometimes it means the minority could actually be in the wrong. Or do you just not think that is ever possible?

  • Sep 21

    Quote from DowntheRiver
    If I worked 40 hours a week I'd make $22,000/year more than the starting teacher salary in my area. I work 32 hours a week and still make $10,000/year more than starting teacher salary in my area. The teachers in my area also did not get their promised raises this year; some of them have been counting on this for 3-4 years. Every year I am eligible for a raise as I am not at my cap yet AND I have the option to work on clinical ladder for a 5% pay increase. All of this and I don't have to take my work home with me and I still get 6 weeks PTO a year.

    So, that's why teacher, EMS, firefighter, etc. discounts exist and we don't qualify.
    This is naïve thinking.

    Also, doctors make more than we do. So...

  • Sep 21

    Quote from cleback
    Yikes sorry... I would hate that kind of management too.

    I don't have any suggestions though, sorry, except escape all jobs that provide human services. My husband works with computers and seems very happy.
    I suggest that people who are being treated so poorly get their lawmakers involved. Speak up. Take action. Very few ever do this, it seems. They just complain and commiserate. Wake up, people. Act like you've got a pair (Gunnery Sgt. Hartman in the movie about Vietnam)

  • Sep 21

    Quote from not.done.yet
    A brave article that brings to light something that most would rather pretend isn't happening. Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately?) the current political and social climate has thrust the truth of it out into the spotlight and it is very difficult to look away from. It is also very difficult to look directly at. How many of us would like to believe we do not have any social bias? How many of us decry the idea of privilege, finding it far more comfortable to believe the playing field is level, despite all evidence to the contrary?

    Keep singing your truth, OP. We all need to hear it, think about it and let it and stories like it change us from the inside out. I am torn up about what is happening in our country and will do what I can to be part of the solution. Sometimes that looks like listening, accepting, thinking and giving credence. Your truth is yours and someone's unwillingness to entertain the idea that it isn't true has less to do with you than it does them. Summary dismissal is just too easy and almost never the right response and it is brave of you to subject yourself to it in the name of putting light on a subject so many prefer to ignore.
    And sometimes it means the minority could actually be in the wrong. Or do you just not think that is ever possible?

  • Sep 21

    Quote from not.done.yet
    A brave article that brings to light something that most would rather pretend isn't happening. Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately?) the current political and social climate has thrust the truth of it out into the spotlight and it is very difficult to look away from. It is also very difficult to look directly at. How many of us would like to believe we do not have any social bias? How many of us decry the idea of privilege, finding it far more comfortable to believe the playing field is level, despite all evidence to the contrary?

    Keep singing your truth, OP. We all need to hear it, think about it and let it and stories like it change us from the inside out. I am torn up about what is happening in our country and will do what I can to be part of the solution. Sometimes that looks like listening, accepting, thinking and giving credence. Your truth is yours and someone's unwillingness to entertain the idea that it isn't true has less to do with you than it does them. Summary dismissal is just too easy and almost never the right response and it is brave of you to subject yourself to it in the name of putting light on a subject so many prefer to ignore.
    And sometimes it means the minority could actually be in the wrong. Or do you just not think that is ever possible?


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