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Kooky Korky 33,132 Views

Joined: Feb 12, '10; Posts: 4,326 (55% Liked) ; Likes: 6,285

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  • 7:16 pm

    Quote from caliotter3
    The fact that they blow you off every time you ask tells you what you need to know.
    However, she's a new grad, wants to be working, might have a money crunch.

    What a turdy way to treat a prospective employee.

    OP, if you can find another job, do that.
    Or contact the hiring manager and speak plainly about your dilemma. I don't know if I'd go to the HR manager/director because you will have made an enemy of a very powerful person. Still, the whole thing is really so disrespectful.
    Best wishes.

  • 7:15 pm

    Quote from Ben_Dover
    You Are Wrong RockNurse. A little birdie told me he'd be making $10.50 an hour that includes PM, NOC, & Weekend differentials.

    If I can be of any assistance. PLEASE DO NOT SHOW-UP TO WORK on the first day of orientation cause once you do, you are considered an employee and on their clock... and as a new grad. you don't want to quit on your first day.

    Have some Balls. Ask them firmly! yeah bring this emoticon face when you see them!
    So just showing up makes you an employee? No written job offer? No discussion of and acceptance of pay, hours, etc.? Somehow, this sounds nutty enough to be seen legally as a job offer but I hope not, especially since OP has an email trail asking for pay rate and hasn't been given one.

  • Dec 10

    Quote from AnnieOaklyRN
    Just to clarify the actual physical commute driving, with little to no traffic is 50 minutes which is more then doable. The only time I get this is when its a saturday or sunday shift that starts at 7 am, otherwise its horrendous. I figured it wouldn't be nearly as bad as it is during the off shifts (11a-11p and 7p-7a) but it is unfortunately. I also try and take public transportation to avoid having to sit in the traffic, as I find it a little more relaxing, the problem is is that it takes 2-3 hours going that way. No easy solution

    I have tried to work with the manager, as the traffic is a bit less during off shifts and it takes 1.5 -2 hours instead of more during those times, but she says she cannot do it. I was actually told could work 11a-11 pm during my interview once off orientation, and clearly that was missinformation. I was also told I would do a couple nights per a schedule (it is actually 6 plus a schedule), and that there would only be 2 or so call shifts per an entire schedule (there are usually 1 to 2 a week for each person!).

    Just to reiterate my decision to leave is NOT just based on commute time, its the team dynamics and the job itself, and the schedule which they were not honestly about during my interview. Since I started 5 plus people have left, the team has very poor morale and it isn't getting any better anytime soon.

    The city where this job is, is EXTREMELY EXPENSIVE, as in a 1 bedroom apartment in a slummy part of town cost about 2000.00 a month. A hotel room is 200.00 plus a night, so those are not options. I own a house in the woods and prefer that, and I would never live in any city! I have always wanted to work at this hospital, thus I accepted the job knowing that it may not work out, or it may end up being my dream job. It hasn't worked out, so I am looking for a new one. There are many people in this world who have taken jobs only to realize it was a big mistake... it happens!


    Annie
    Are there any call rooms? Or could you get a room in the Nurses' Residence if there is one. You could go there immediately after your shift and maybe catch a nap before you drive home.

  • Dec 10

    Quote from applewhitern
    I would simply starve before I risked my license, career, health, and life, by being an escort, period.
    You most likely would not. You would figure out that you could panhandle or get a job in fast food places or any of a dozen other places.

    You would go to churches and other religious institutions and charities.

    Or friends and neighbors, etc.

  • Dec 10
  • Dec 9

    I think it stinks that a particular aide doesn't reap the punishment for being a total jerk. I think it stinks that the bosses don't get rid of him or, at least, make him toe the mark that you and other aides have to toe. Who is he sleeping with? Who is he related to? What do patients say about him, if you happen to know? if I were the boss, he'd be terminated. Now don't start gossiping or trying to find the answers to these questions. I'm just thinking out loud about why he is given so much slack and encouraged to be a terrible worker.

    I don't think you abandoned your post. I understand why you were frustrated. He simply should have to take whatever post is left over, if and when he decides to show up. you should not have been jerked around.

    That said, I guess you'd better seek life elsewhere or get used to this. Sorry you have to deal with this, but there are jerks in every job, terrible bosses all over the world.

    And believe me, it is just as hard for a nurse to be overloaded as for an aide. i hope you never have to find out. What a miserable profession we have become.

  • Dec 9

    Quote from PWA98
    My floor is like that as well usually 1:8-1:10. Med surg/Tele. Mostly with 1 or no aid. The pts are very sick too. Very unsafe. But we have no choice, we can't say no, the hospital said it is abandonment if we do not accept the pts that are admitted to the floor.
    Talk with a couple of attorneys to make sure, but I don't think it's abandonment for you to refuse what you know to be an unsafe assignment.

    How can you abandon a patient whom you have not accepted? Your employer won't be pleased, but it sounds like it's time you AND YOUR COWORKERS stood up to them.

    Yes, it's all about money.

  • Dec 8

    Quote from NewKidOnTheFloor
    Hello there! I finished my BSN in May 2016 and was unable to find a job until 2 months ago. I started in a med/surg floor. The patient ratio is usually around 1:10 and all I got where 10 days of orientation on the floor(9 of which were spent as a CNA because they were short staffed). So after my one day with an RN, I was let go to do it all myself. I was so scared, but decided my best ally would be a good attitude and willingness to learn. Quitting is not an option. I love this job too much. But after 2 months, I can't sleep (without dreaming about being in the hospital) my stress levels have affected my health, I barely eat and I just feel like a total failure. I struggle to keep up with the workload, I feel horrible asking so many questions (I want my patients to be safe) I worry I can't handle this, and find myself wondering what have I done by becoming a nurse. This feeling fades when I get to make a difference. But as a new nurse, I feel more like a burden. I'm 37 and have never felt so incompetent in my life. Will this ever go away?

    Well, they certainly have you where they want you - Feeling guilty for breathing.

    Please realize that you are being used and abused. I understand you want to keep the job. But why should you feel horrible for asking questions, why should you feel like a burden when you had next to zero orientation?

    By becoming a nurse, you have entered a profession that can be wonderful, but which can also be, as you see, horrible when you work for an employer such as yours.

    What have you been doing for the last 2 years?

    I suggest you have a serious talk with yourself. Then with your boss.

    What would you advise another nurse in the same situation?

  • Dec 8

    Quote from twinsmom788
    "Either things in Vanderbilt are run by a group of recent Acute Psych unit escapees, or I do not know."

    "Or I do not know" That is correct. You don't know. Trust me, Vandy is run by a expert and knowledgeable group of physicians and nurses. My daughters have both worked there in the summer between their third and fourth year of med school.

    I have some knowledge of this hospital because I have been there numerous times to investigate sentinel events very much like this. There are mistakes made at this very large hospital complex and I have substantiated several of them.

    Please read the 2567 to obtain more details so you will know.
    And this first rate place has a shortage of nurses. But there was at least one who should have said "no" when she was stretched too far. Already covering for a nurse on break, already stretched too far to even consider doing something as dangerous as conscious sedation.
    And what does this say about the surgeon/radiologist and the other staff in the PET room who watched her leave instead of stay and monitor.
    Your hallowed hospital, where your dtrs worked - really wow about that, no errors could have been there if your dtrs worked there, wow - is in just as much as every other hospital in the US. And it's all due to $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$.

  • Dec 8

    You can develop critical thinking skills. What a bunch of baloney you've been fed!

    Don't go into too much debt. you will have to spend your whole life paying it off, maybe even into retirement - if you ever get to retire.

    Slow down, take a deep breath, renew your efforts.

    Set aside the frustration and anger. Figure out what you have been doing wrong and correct that.

    Get a tutor now NOW NOW.

    Best wishes.

  • Dec 8

    You can develop critical thinking skills. What a bunch of baloney you've been fed!

    Don't go into too much debt. you will have to spend your whole life paying it off, maybe even into retirement - if you ever get to retire.

    Slow down, take a deep breath, renew your efforts.

    Set aside the frustration and anger. Figure out what you have been doing wrong and correct that.

    Get a tutor now NOW NOW.

    Best wishes.

  • Dec 8

    Quote from PWA98
    My floor is like that as well usually 1:8-1:10. Med surg/Tele. Mostly with 1 or no aid. The pts are very sick too. Very unsafe. But we have no choice, we can't say no, the hospital said it is abandonment if we do not accept the pts that are admitted to the floor.
    Talk with a couple of attorneys to make sure, but I don't think it's abandonment for you to refuse what you know to be an unsafe assignment.

    How can you abandon a patient whom you have not accepted? Your employer won't be pleased, but it sounds like it's time you AND YOUR COWORKERS stood up to them.

    Yes, it's all about money.

  • Dec 8

    You can develop critical thinking skills. What a bunch of baloney you've been fed!

    Don't go into too much debt. you will have to spend your whole life paying it off, maybe even into retirement - if you ever get to retire.

    Slow down, take a deep breath, renew your efforts.

    Set aside the frustration and anger. Figure out what you have been doing wrong and correct that.

    Get a tutor now NOW NOW.

    Best wishes.

  • Dec 8

    Quote from NewKidOnTheFloor
    Hello there! I finished my BSN in May 2016 and was unable to find a job until 2 months ago. I started in a med/surg floor. The patient ratio is usually around 1:10 and all I got where 10 days of orientation on the floor(9 of which were spent as a CNA because they were short staffed). So after my one day with an RN, I was let go to do it all myself. I was so scared, but decided my best ally would be a good attitude and willingness to learn. Quitting is not an option. I love this job too much. But after 2 months, I can't sleep (without dreaming about being in the hospital) my stress levels have affected my health, I barely eat and I just feel like a total failure. I struggle to keep up with the workload, I feel horrible asking so many questions (I want my patients to be safe) I worry I can't handle this, and find myself wondering what have I done by becoming a nurse. This feeling fades when I get to make a difference. But as a new nurse, I feel more like a burden. I'm 37 and have never felt so incompetent in my life. Will this ever go away?

    Well, they certainly have you where they want you - Feeling guilty for breathing.

    Please realize that you are being used and abused. I understand you want to keep the job. But why should you feel horrible for asking questions, why should you feel like a burden when you had next to zero orientation?

    By becoming a nurse, you have entered a profession that can be wonderful, but which can also be, as you see, horrible when you work for an employer such as yours.

    What have you been doing for the last 2 years?

    I suggest you have a serious talk with yourself. Then with your boss.

    What would you advise another nurse in the same situation?

  • Dec 7

    Quote from NewKidOnTheFloor
    Hello there! I finished my BSN in May 2016 and was unable to find a job until 2 months ago. I started in a med/surg floor. The patient ratio is usually around 1:10 and all I got where 10 days of orientation on the floor(9 of which were spent as a CNA because they were short staffed). So after my one day with an RN, I was let go to do it all myself. I was so scared, but decided my best ally would be a good attitude and willingness to learn. Quitting is not an option. I love this job too much. But after 2 months, I can't sleep (without dreaming about being in the hospital) my stress levels have affected my health, I barely eat and I just feel like a total failure. I struggle to keep up with the workload, I feel horrible asking so many questions (I want my patients to be safe) I worry I can't handle this, and find myself wondering what have I done by becoming a nurse. This feeling fades when I get to make a difference. But as a new nurse, I feel more like a burden. I'm 37 and have never felt so incompetent in my life. Will this ever go away?

    Well, they certainly have you where they want you - Feeling guilty for breathing.

    Please realize that you are being used and abused. I understand you want to keep the job. But why should you feel horrible for asking questions, why should you feel like a burden when you had next to zero orientation?

    By becoming a nurse, you have entered a profession that can be wonderful, but which can also be, as you see, horrible when you work for an employer such as yours.

    What have you been doing for the last 2 years?

    I suggest you have a serious talk with yourself. Then with your boss.

    What would you advise another nurse in the same situation?


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