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JBMmom, MSN, RN 10,073 Views

Joined: Jun 24, '09; Posts: 547 (46% Liked) ; Likes: 1,127

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  • Jun 7

    When I went to nursing school, my kids were 2, 4 and 6 years old. I also worked full-time, taught Sunday school, swimming lessons, and had time for quality family time. If it's what you want or need to do, you will get it done. I was fortunate that daycare wasn't an issue because my husband was a stay-at-home dad for many years, but even if he hadn't been, I needed to finish the degree to make sure I could provide for my family. You can do it, don't listen to people that tell you that you can't. Good luck!!

  • Jun 6

    When I went to nursing school, my kids were 2, 4 and 6 years old. I also worked full-time, taught Sunday school, swimming lessons, and had time for quality family time. If it's what you want or need to do, you will get it done. I was fortunate that daycare wasn't an issue because my husband was a stay-at-home dad for many years, but even if he hadn't been, I needed to finish the degree to make sure I could provide for my family. You can do it, don't listen to people that tell you that you can't. Good luck!!

  • Jun 6

    When I went to nursing school, my kids were 2, 4 and 6 years old. I also worked full-time, taught Sunday school, swimming lessons, and had time for quality family time. If it's what you want or need to do, you will get it done. I was fortunate that daycare wasn't an issue because my husband was a stay-at-home dad for many years, but even if he hadn't been, I needed to finish the degree to make sure I could provide for my family. You can do it, don't listen to people that tell you that you can't. Good luck!!

  • Jun 6

    I was not a CNA before becoming a RN, but I think that it's beneficial to have that experience before starting nursing school. I know that in my first semester of school, I had to get comfortable with doing vital signs and helping with patient care, which was a big change for me. My classmates that were already CNAs had a much easier transition in that aspect. As far as the schedule/pay/etc, you're going to find that's very specific to where you end up working. Generally the hours are pretty set 7am-3:30pm, 3pm-11:30pm or 11pm-7:30am. There are usually 24, 32 and 40 hour positions for those shifts. As for the stress, there's stress in almost anything, but if it's what you've got to do, you find a way. Good luck to you.

  • Apr 30

    Thanks to everyone that has taken the time to respond. The program in Pennsylvania sounds wonderful, I wish it were available here!! The problem for my patient now is that she is alert, oriented, and STUBBORN. Day and evening shift have dubbed her "evil", because she's not compliant with things offered. Doesn't want new clothes ("I arrived in these clothes, and I'll go home in these clothes"), refuses skin checks, won't allow an IV, etc. All valid objections in an alert and oriented person, and we've had a great relationship on nights. But again, I have more time and she can talk to me for 20 minutes if she wants, while the other shifts don't have that time. Her dog was put in a kennel, I was able to call the police last night and get information on how she's doing. I'm going to stay tomorrow and talk with the case manager and hospitalist. No one's going to speak up for her because she's alienated them. I talked with her this morning before I left and told her she needs to play the game and be nice to people. They hold all the cards right now and if she continues to be rude to staff, she'll just delay her discharge. I hope I can talk them into letting her go home tomorrow. She's been making calls to follow up on the heat and it should be back on.

    Oh, and the neighbor has been checking on her for years and often cares for her pets. He was just concerned about her lack of heat and didn't know how to help.

  • Apr 26

    It will largely depend on your place of work how this will be addressed. If the patient has made a formal complaint, there will be an investigation that will hopefully result in the best outcome. Good luck.

  • Apr 26

    It will largely depend on your place of work how this will be addressed. If the patient has made a formal complaint, there will be an investigation that will hopefully result in the best outcome. Good luck.

  • Apr 23

    There will always be something to feel guilty about. I will remember forever that I missed my son's first day of kindergarten because it was my first day of nursing school. My oldest cried every Sunday night the semester that I had evening clinicals Monday and Tuesday (and a day job), because I would not see them again until Wednesday. Even now, I just started a 7p-7a job and my 10- year old sniffled that I would be missing bedtime now when I work. But, I'm doing my best to provide for my family, and that's what they need. When I'm home I do my best to really be home, not on my phone or computer, spending time with them, so they know I'm really there. We will all get through, and when they talk about my school / 2 jobs / more school years, they don't focus on the times I missed, they have good memories of times together.

    And you're a nurse, period. Every job needs a different set of skills. Not better. Not worse. Unique. There are many aspects to a job, and one important one is how it fits with your life. You're doing your best, and your kids have a hard working mom as a role model, good work!

  • Apr 19

    There will always be something to feel guilty about. I will remember forever that I missed my son's first day of kindergarten because it was my first day of nursing school. My oldest cried every Sunday night the semester that I had evening clinicals Monday and Tuesday (and a day job), because I would not see them again until Wednesday. Even now, I just started a 7p-7a job and my 10- year old sniffled that I would be missing bedtime now when I work. But, I'm doing my best to provide for my family, and that's what they need. When I'm home I do my best to really be home, not on my phone or computer, spending time with them, so they know I'm really there. We will all get through, and when they talk about my school / 2 jobs / more school years, they don't focus on the times I missed, they have good memories of times together.

    And you're a nurse, period. Every job needs a different set of skills. Not better. Not worse. Unique. There are many aspects to a job, and one important one is how it fits with your life. You're doing your best, and your kids have a hard working mom as a role model, good work!

  • Apr 17

    There will always be something to feel guilty about. I will remember forever that I missed my son's first day of kindergarten because it was my first day of nursing school. My oldest cried every Sunday night the semester that I had evening clinicals Monday and Tuesday (and a day job), because I would not see them again until Wednesday. Even now, I just started a 7p-7a job and my 10- year old sniffled that I would be missing bedtime now when I work. But, I'm doing my best to provide for my family, and that's what they need. When I'm home I do my best to really be home, not on my phone or computer, spending time with them, so they know I'm really there. We will all get through, and when they talk about my school / 2 jobs / more school years, they don't focus on the times I missed, they have good memories of times together.

    And you're a nurse, period. Every job needs a different set of skills. Not better. Not worse. Unique. There are many aspects to a job, and one important one is how it fits with your life. You're doing your best, and your kids have a hard working mom as a role model, good work!

  • Apr 15

    Quote from Jenbripsu
    I am definitely seeing from the responses that this IS the norm and I have to say I'm disappointed. Apparently I was pretty naïve.
    However, it won't change a thing for how I will behave. I'm not saying that I won't ever talk about a patient. I will say that I won't call a patient a ****** ***** because they are in pain and then make fun of their military service. And I won't talk about them when the family is 15 feet away. But other than that, I am certainly not saying I am better than anyone. I wanted to know if it was normal and apparently, the answer is yes. In 6 months in clinical experiences, this is the first time I heard a nurse talk like this, so I was surprised. That's all.
    No, it's not the norm. And no, it's not right. I think that sometimes when students come here and criticize practicing nurses on a variety of issues, there are numerous responses related to "wait until you're a nurse and then see what you do when.....", but you're right, there is no reason for that to happen.

    You said you have years of experience in the professional environment. Certainly you must have had coworkers that were petty and small minded. Well, now you're going to work with some nurses that are petty and small minded, different field, same personalities. You don't have to be one of them, just as you weren't in your previous professional experiences. I'm sorry that you're disappointed because of this experience, but I know you've been around long enough to know people are just people. I hear plenty of that from other nurses and to be honest, I don't bother to get involved with those conversations because calling someone out is only going to cause ill will, it's not going to change how they are and they will still do it. Don't be discouraged, it doesn't happen everywhere, and you'll quickly find the people you want to avoid because they don't act in a manner you agree with.

  • Apr 15

    There will always be something to feel guilty about. I will remember forever that I missed my son's first day of kindergarten because it was my first day of nursing school. My oldest cried every Sunday night the semester that I had evening clinicals Monday and Tuesday (and a day job), because I would not see them again until Wednesday. Even now, I just started a 7p-7a job and my 10- year old sniffled that I would be missing bedtime now when I work. But, I'm doing my best to provide for my family, and that's what they need. When I'm home I do my best to really be home, not on my phone or computer, spending time with them, so they know I'm really there. We will all get through, and when they talk about my school / 2 jobs / more school years, they don't focus on the times I missed, they have good memories of times together.

    And you're a nurse, period. Every job needs a different set of skills. Not better. Not worse. Unique. There are many aspects to a job, and one important one is how it fits with your life. You're doing your best, and your kids have a hard working mom as a role model, good work!

  • Apr 14

    There will always be something to feel guilty about. I will remember forever that I missed my son's first day of kindergarten because it was my first day of nursing school. My oldest cried every Sunday night the semester that I had evening clinicals Monday and Tuesday (and a day job), because I would not see them again until Wednesday. Even now, I just started a 7p-7a job and my 10- year old sniffled that I would be missing bedtime now when I work. But, I'm doing my best to provide for my family, and that's what they need. When I'm home I do my best to really be home, not on my phone or computer, spending time with them, so they know I'm really there. We will all get through, and when they talk about my school / 2 jobs / more school years, they don't focus on the times I missed, they have good memories of times together.

    And you're a nurse, period. Every job needs a different set of skills. Not better. Not worse. Unique. There are many aspects to a job, and one important one is how it fits with your life. You're doing your best, and your kids have a hard working mom as a role model, good work!

  • Apr 9

    Quote from Jenbripsu
    I am definitely seeing from the responses that this IS the norm and I have to say I'm disappointed. Apparently I was pretty naïve.
    However, it won't change a thing for how I will behave. I'm not saying that I won't ever talk about a patient. I will say that I won't call a patient a ****** ***** because they are in pain and then make fun of their military service. And I won't talk about them when the family is 15 feet away. But other than that, I am certainly not saying I am better than anyone. I wanted to know if it was normal and apparently, the answer is yes. In 6 months in clinical experiences, this is the first time I heard a nurse talk like this, so I was surprised. That's all.
    No, it's not the norm. And no, it's not right. I think that sometimes when students come here and criticize practicing nurses on a variety of issues, there are numerous responses related to "wait until you're a nurse and then see what you do when.....", but you're right, there is no reason for that to happen.

    You said you have years of experience in the professional environment. Certainly you must have had coworkers that were petty and small minded. Well, now you're going to work with some nurses that are petty and small minded, different field, same personalities. You don't have to be one of them, just as you weren't in your previous professional experiences. I'm sorry that you're disappointed because of this experience, but I know you've been around long enough to know people are just people. I hear plenty of that from other nurses and to be honest, I don't bother to get involved with those conversations because calling someone out is only going to cause ill will, it's not going to change how they are and they will still do it. Don't be discouraged, it doesn't happen everywhere, and you'll quickly find the people you want to avoid because they don't act in a manner you agree with.

  • Apr 9

    Quote from Jenbripsu
    I am definitely seeing from the responses that this IS the norm and I have to say I'm disappointed. Apparently I was pretty naïve.
    However, it won't change a thing for how I will behave. I'm not saying that I won't ever talk about a patient. I will say that I won't call a patient a ****** ***** because they are in pain and then make fun of their military service. And I won't talk about them when the family is 15 feet away. But other than that, I am certainly not saying I am better than anyone. I wanted to know if it was normal and apparently, the answer is yes. In 6 months in clinical experiences, this is the first time I heard a nurse talk like this, so I was surprised. That's all.
    No, it's not the norm. And no, it's not right. I think that sometimes when students come here and criticize practicing nurses on a variety of issues, there are numerous responses related to "wait until you're a nurse and then see what you do when.....", but you're right, there is no reason for that to happen.

    You said you have years of experience in the professional environment. Certainly you must have had coworkers that were petty and small minded. Well, now you're going to work with some nurses that are petty and small minded, different field, same personalities. You don't have to be one of them, just as you weren't in your previous professional experiences. I'm sorry that you're disappointed because of this experience, but I know you've been around long enough to know people are just people. I hear plenty of that from other nurses and to be honest, I don't bother to get involved with those conversations because calling someone out is only going to cause ill will, it's not going to change how they are and they will still do it. Don't be discouraged, it doesn't happen everywhere, and you'll quickly find the people you want to avoid because they don't act in a manner you agree with.


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