Latest Comments by KeLsRN

KeLsRN 1,457 Views

Joined: Mar 30, '09; Posts: 17 (18% Liked) ; Likes: 3

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    jojonavy likes this.

    congratulations! Which program, OEH or FNP? Either way, WAY TO GO!

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    jojonavy likes this.

    I got an email saying I had a "notification pending" on my application.

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    jojonavy likes this.

    I just found out I got accepted into the AC/AGNP program! But I know that the FNP has not sent out their decisions yet. Anyone else going for AC/AGNP?

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    Hi all,
    I just found out I didn't get accepted into the Acute Care NP program of my choice (at the university hospital where I work on a cards step-down unit). I am really bummed. I'm also trying to figure out what my next step should be. I'm fairly sure that I have decent grades and education but am lacking in experience (no ICU or ED). So I'm considering transferring within the next year to one of those units or applying to the Adult NP program next year at the same school. There are pluses to both those options. I love my unit- I have great coworkers and a great schedule. However, I have always wanted to work in an ICU or ED, and would prefer to become an ACNP to being an ANP. The other option is to look into online programs. I feel like I need to do something soon, since I am in my early thirties (started my nursing career a little late).
    Does anyone have any words of wisdom for me? Should I transfer and try to gain experience before reapplying, or would it be wise to look at other programs? Ultimately, I would like to work inpatient or in an acute clinic. I am also nervous about doing school later while starting a family. Let me know what you think!

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    I got into oncology because they were one of the only departments hiring at my hospital. It's really challenging, so you see a lot of turnover in nurses as they burn out, particularly at an inpatient level. That said, it is also very rewarding and a way to learn a lot of skills quickly.

    Your plan sounds good, but I would try to touch base with any and all contacts in CA that you have now, see if you can volunteer on breaks or shadow a nurse, because the job situation in CA is cutthroat. Otherwise, consider alternative locations with the plan of moving to CA after you have a couple years under your belt.

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    Oh, and we don't work with peds cases- our floor is adult only.

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    I'm on a hem/onc floor as a new grad, and have floated to our adjoining BMT floor. It seems like a great place for a new nurse to start out at, because you see such a variety of conditions. Some patients are incredibly heave, some are just in for treatment and are pretty independent. Emotionally, you also see a lot of variety, as some people are at the end of life and some are curable. You also get a lot of electrolyte replacement, blood/platelet transfusions, interesting surgical cases, and experience with chemotherapy infusions.
    Good luck!

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    I am finishing out my first year as an RN on a busy oncology unit at a major hospital in Washington DC. I am interested in moving to the Bay area or Northern California with my boyfriend for a few years (he is self employed and from the West Coast).
    My question is.......with this economy and apparently the difficulty for new graduate nurses in California to find a job, what are my odds of finding a job in these areas? I would ideally like to move into emergency or ICU so that I can go to NP school in a few years, probably for acute care. I know the rent is horrible, but I would like to try the city out for a while and I can afford a one bedroom with my boyfriend, so that's not a huge problem.
    So what kind of reception do you think I can expect if I have some actual RN experience, am applying for a CA license, and would like to move to Bay area or northern cali? I also like Berkeley, Napa and Santa Barbara, but that is my wishlist.
    Thanks!

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    I went through this same process recently, and it ended up that California sent my verification directly to Illinois- I didn't find this out until I got my license in the mail.
    BUT......please know that you don't need this to get a temporary license in Illinois! It is confusing to read through all the fine print, but you can apply to get a temporary license (which will be issued within 14 days of receipt of the application) with a copy of your transcript, current nursing license, and the completed application and fee. So you don't need to wait for California to send that, because it took them 6 weeks in my case.

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    If you are deciding between DC and NY, try to identify where you want to work and what the tuition is like in each place (obviously both are really expensive). I know nothing about NY, but looking back at Georgetown I was happy with completing a nusing program in 16 months- however, I was upset about the expense and lack of structure in the program, which I know they are trying to work on, especially with the program growing so much. I also saw many students at smaller schools who were getting the same clinical experience, and had just as many job opportunities in the area.
    I too was very close to my cohort- and tutoring for first semester students is available for patho. We did, however have people fail out who had to attend for an extra semester.
    If I were deciding between two programs, I would try to make a budget and a plan for where you want to work after school, and try to decide which school fits best with both.
    Good luck! Let me know what you go with or if you have more questions!

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    The theology classes were fine--- I liked it. I would recommend the standard one "Problem of God" and see if you can get a recommendation on the teacher. Some of the classes are taught by Jesuit priests and they're supposed to be really good. Don't take Buddhism- it's supposed to be really hard. There is a Holocaust class that is supposed to be awesome too.
    I had trouble finding a job after graduation out of state, and Georgetown didn't really tell us when to start applying- you should apply a LOT during your last semester. I started last month at University of Chicago, which I am really happy to have gotten. But Georgetown "name" will not get you a job unless you are in DC. I got in through a family contact.

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    I did, however, have teachers who were dedicated and very helpful, which is a definite plus. The program's administration and planning, however, need a lot of work.

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    I think the reason a lot of grads say they wouldn't do it again is because the school seems to be out for making a profit off you.....For example, they "require" you to take a 3 day NCLEX course before graduating that they hire an outside instructor to do.....oh and it's $200. You also have to take an online course (another $200) if you don't pass the mock NCLEX exams within 3 tries. And believe me, that 3 day course is 3 days I will never get back......not worth it! But I think Georgetown makes money from the outside course, so that will never change.
    Another problem- one of the first semester courses is a "weed-out" course that many students have problems with. In my class, 4 students did not pass. They were automatically bumped back a class and now have to pay an extra semester's tuition to attend, making it a full 2 year program and not a 16 month program.
    You are put into clinicals with regular Georgetown junior level nursing students who have been taking nursing classes since freshman or sophomore year---so that is an intense learning curve, particularly if you don't have a lot of hospital experience.
    All in all, I would NOT do Georgetown again. They provided very little help with tasks like resume and job preparation, unless you are going to WHC through their scholarship program or want to work at Georgetown, which I didn't. I defnitely learned how to become a nurse, but I would have liked to have done it at a program where I felt more supported and not like the school was looking at a walking dollar sign.

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    I graduated from Georgetowns accelerated BSN program this December, and I don't recommend it. For the money, you can get an equal or better education at any other nursing school. We frequently saw clinicals from Marymount and other DC nursing schools at the hospital, getting the same experience. We definitely had competitive classes and had no problem on the NCLEX, but the overall pass rate on the NCLEX is high anyways.
    My advice is to go to nursing school in the town where you want to ultimately work- that is the best way to get a job there. If you are commiting to a job in DC, then Georgetown is fine, but you could just as easily go to a cheaper school and not have as much debt when you graduate, and get the same job. Going for the Georgetown name, in this case, is just not that smart.

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    As a new grad, I am geting 28.48 for the first 24 hours of a 2 week payroll. Hours 25-36 pay at 34.98. The average of these rates is 30.37/hr. Pretty good if you ask me. My hospital rhymes with university of SCHMICAGO.


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