Content That Not_A_Hat_Person Likes

Not_A_Hat_Person, RN 35,791 Views

Joined: Dec 5, '08; Posts: 3,513 (51% Liked) ; Likes: 6,121

Sorted By Last Like Given (Max 500)
  • 2:00 pm

    No, this doctor was rude and unprofessional and got what she deserved because of her behavior. We are all human, and as healthcare providers the stress can take you there for sure. But she needed to do a ten count or walk away and come back, or whatever she needed to do to compose herself. Tugging on a patient and swearing has no place in a professional position or environment.

    I've been spit on, punched in the chest, cursed out, called names and still kept it together. Even when I'm being firm with someone, I do it in a professional manner. What the patient was doing was annoying as ever. And who knows what all the doctor was experiencing on that day...in her personal life or on the unit. But everything we do is scrutinized at all times and we're held to a higher standard. And as professionals we should be.

  • 2:00 pm

    I work in the ER. Believe me, this type of patient comes in all ethnicities and genders. It's not a racial thing at all.

    In my ER, if a patient won't leave, first we call security, then the police if necessary. We do have a doctor who will carry on similar to this doctor. I find his behavior unbecoming. It's always bad to lower oneself and allow pathetic people to push ones buttons.

  • 2:00 pm

    Since you started the thread, it would have been nice of you to provide a link to this story.

  • 1:52 pm

    I agree in the sainthood thing. But a bit of appreciation would be nice, or even just respect. Anyone whose there to help shouldn't be abused, whether youre a nurse, ambulance officer, PCA, student, doctor, physio ect.

  • Jun 21

    My service sees CHS fairly frequently. You'd think people would figure out that smoking the pot is making their nausea worse instead of better (since that's the rationale they offer for why they're smoking so much pot), but, no ... And, boy howdy, they sure do not want to hear that laying off the pot is what they need to do to quit throwing up all the time.

  • Jun 20

    I called the doctor's office to obtain the order for the increase in a seizure med (pt was having back to back seizures all day.) Mom had already talked to the doctor moments before and gotten the orders as to the new dose and extra Diastat dose. I had TOLD the mom that when she got ahold of the doctor to put me on the phone with him so I could take the verbal order. We made it clear to her when she started with our agency that the nurses needed to get the orders from the doctors in order to implement them. But she didn't put him on the phone with me.

    When I called, the nurse had to call me back. For some reason, the office nurse, when calling back, called the mom instead of me. The mom stomped into the room and reamed me out for calling the Dr. office. She yelled stating I am NEVER allowed to call a provider without her approval first. (I had TOLD her already I NEEDED to talk to them to legally give the meds myself and make the order official.)

    Essentially, she treated me like a babysitter who snooped around calling her daughter's doctors.

    A bit later she said to me, handing me a syringe, "here is the so and so dose of medication the neurologist said to give."

    I looked at her directly in the eyes and stated that since she did not permit me to obtain the order, I was not legally allowed to administer it. ALSO that I cannot legally give meds drawn up by anyone other than myself.

    She was flabbergasted. Despite having had nursing care for her daughter for 18 years (meaning she had experience with how orders work and she should have known this) And despite me telling her "Don't forget to hand the phone to me when the doctor calls you back so I can write the official order allowing the nurses to give it.

    She just went off on me, trying to bait me into an argument when she reamed me out for calling the office after she hung up. I did not take the bait, simply said, "Ok." When she kept trying to bait me, repeating herself over and over, I calmly said, "Please speak with my supervisor."my

  • Jun 20

    I was called into my employers office, sat down with 2 of the main managers because I wasn't sweeping an 11yr old room, taking out the trash, putting the dogs outside to pee at night and that I would walk outside to start my car when it was icy.... this patient is ambulatory. Apart of patient's care plan and therapy is to do light chores... I'm a nurse not a babysitter or a maid. Sorry.

  • Jun 15

    Quote from psu_213
    I just wanted to add: I'm not sure that the 'for profit' thing matters all that much. I work for a non profit hospital, but we do lots of petty budget things, and the hospital still makes a big profit, just not for share holders.

    Only you know what is best for you. Better financials by staying at home vs. the attraction of the big city. No one can answer that for you. I second what others have said--that it is not and either or decision that you have to make right now.
    I think it does make a difference. For profit companies care about profits above all else. I just worked for a for profit company for the past 3 years and I will never do that again. I have never felt like any of my non-profit employers put profits ahead of patients though sure they did petty budget things too. But they never said "we're not going to service Medicare patients for this therapy because the reimbursement was cut" like my last employer did.

    OP, I picked moving to the city over living at home when I was a new grad because I decided I'd rather pay rent and have my sanity than live at home to save money but go insane from living with my family. I never really considered working anywhere other than in the city, though, so living at home would have also meant a huge commute and the gas money plus the cost to part at the hospital probably would have canceled out any of the money I would have saved on rent anyway.

  • Jun 15

    Quote from billswife
    Every word is so true. Sadly, it doesn't always work. In our ICU this weekI had a septic patient, and the Intensivist and I definitely provided "shock and awe" care. The family was wonderful and appreciative. After 13 hours on my feeet with no lunch, assisting in bronching, line insertion, and starting CRRT, at the very end of the shift I receive a 'variance' due to an order I entered at the MD's request to mix sodium bicarbonate drip in NS rather than a dextrose base if possible; if not the usual D5w base was fine. For the life of me, I don't understand how entering his order is a "variance", but I DO know I left work sad and disheartened that this was the ONLY response to my hard work that I received that day. This is why morale is at its lowest point ever, and why new nurses don't want to stay bedside.
    I couldn't agree more, you literally run your bottom off all day long and get nothing except "well, that wasn't good enough", very disheartening!!

  • Jun 15

    Every word is so true. Sadly, it doesn't always work. In our ICU this weekI had a septic patient, and the Intensivist and I definitely provided "shock and awe" care. The family was wonderful and appreciative. After 13 hours on my feeet with no lunch, assisting in bronching, line insertion, and starting CRRT, at the very end of the shift I receive a 'variance' due to an order I entered at the MD's request to mix sodium bicarbonate drip in NS rather than a dextrose base if possible; if not the usual D5w base was fine. For the life of me, I don't understand how entering his order is a "variance", but I DO know I left work sad and disheartened that this was the ONLY response to my hard work that I received that day. This is why morale is at its lowest point ever, and why new nurses don't want to stay bedside.

  • Jun 15

    I think the problem is that the job market has changed and employers have not adjusted to that change yet.

    Nurses are in very high demand where I live. Nurses can pick where they want to work. But employers are still operating as though every job offer is a gift from God, and anyone who gets one should take it.

    Prospective employees should be given an opportunity to shadow, time to make a decision and an opportunity to review the details of the employee contract before an offer is accepted. None of the job offers I have gotten since I graduated have provided all of these.

    Employees are left to take jobs blindly. It's not surprising that they are often left in positions that are not a good fit.

  • Jun 15

    Quote from klone
    Employment at will. The employer or the employee can terminate employment at any time, for any reason, or no reason at all.

    I truly believe that a person's loyalty/responsibility should be to themselves and their families FIRST. I also really don't want an employee who is not fully engaged in their job. I would rather they leave and make room for someone who is.
    ^^ This.

    Most of today's organizations in the US have absolutely no loyalty or care for their employees. Pensions are stripped, health care cost for employees are up, and they find every way possible to boost their bottom lines including cutting into employee benefits. We should always put ourselves first.

    If employees are not staying, perhaps you should ask "what can I do better to retain talents" rather than blaming people who want to look out for themselves.

  • Jun 15

    Quote from Emergent
    I'm of the opinion that, we should do our due diligence before we accept a job. We need to find out specifics such as ratios, hours, etc. Then we make the commitment to work there. Unless you've been lied to, I think you should stay for more than 6 weeks.

    It's a common theme here, often a new grad who settles for the job they can get, who then wants to jump ship right away! I've seen different versions of this many times. I've heard various rationale, I hate nightshift , I'm not challenged on med-surg, I have too many patients in LTC, my coworkers are rude bullies, etc.

    There are some extreme situations of course, but generally speaking I think it's unprofessional to bail out of a job so soon.
    while i agree with the overall statement, where you lose me is where you mention

    "I hate nightshift , I'm not challenged on med-surg, I have too many patients in LTC, my coworkers are rude bullies, etc." as i find all of these pretty valid reasons to want to leave a job.

    i hate nightshift -- while nightshift mayve initially seemed like a good idea at the time, if its not working out for you, why damage your health and overall wellbeing and peace of mind for what i would consider no good reason either

    im not challenged on m/s-- if youre working in an environment that you dont feel challenged or an overall will or drive to do well, your performance slips, plain and simple. showing up to work becomes a drag and almost soul-crushing when you have no interest in what you're doing. again, why subject yourself to that?

    i have too many pts on LTC-- if you cant handle your workload, you become unsafe, and pts suffer. 'nuff said

    my coworkers are rude bullies-- we spend 12 hrs a day (ideally) with these people. if you factor in the fact that youre probably asleep for 8 hrs a day, you have 4 hrs of alone time you probably use to decompress after a shift. if you're anything like me, working a stretch of 3 or 4, you're only ever asleep, eating, driving to work and actually at work. so to have to spend so much of your awake/conscious time around pts that run you ragged, and then to be kicked around by your coworkers as well again makes very little sense to me.

    no job is perfect, and we all value and dislike many aspects of where we work and what we do. but theres only so much we should be expected to sacrifice in ourselves.

  • Jun 15

    I used to think like that, too. I drove an hour and a half one way to my first nursing job for 15 months before I finally had to change to a hospital closer to home. I was literally falling asleep driving home on the busiest highway in my state. Now I've been at my current job for 3 years. I come in extra all the time to prevent mandatory overtime. I switch shifts to cover holes. I float out of turn. I come in extra on other units if mine is staffed well to prevent other units from having mandatory overtime. I'm a precepting MACHINE, I pump out nurses like clockwork. I'm charge all the damn time.

    My hospital could not care less. A resident accused me of patient negligence a few months ago. Long story short she was covering her own butt because she had actually put orders in way wrong. Admin did not hesitate to jump down my throat and point fingers at me. Even the union wasn't helpful. What saved me was my own detailed charting, and a fully oriented patient who about had a stroke when they told her what I was being accused of.

    I don't owe them anything. I give them my time and in turn they give me a paycheck. Life is short; there's no reason to stay at a job you don't want, even if there isn't anything wrong with that job.

  • Jun 15

    I think the majority of new grads do stick with their jobs. However those who are uncertain if the should switch are far more likely to post here than those who stay put. Life is too short to be in a workplace you are truely unhappy or feel unsafe. My cadveat would be to have another position lines up before switching


close