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herring_RN Guide 94,707 Views

Joined: Mar 14, '04; Posts: 17,623 (73% Liked) ; Likes: 36,148

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  • May 28

    Quote from wondern
    Respectfully...the ideals of that designation in our nursing culture? hmmm...

    Do I/we qualify?


    Gee, I passed my boards and do my continuing education is that not good enough in my short staffed almost daily working world?

    Little rant...I'm thinking 'magnet' designation needs to include things like providing sufficient staff including experienced and qualified medical staff as well as ancillary staff and sometimes providing enough of even the basic medical equipment to get the job done efficiently e.g. enough wheelchairs to help with providing basic such so-called magnet care.

    That's real life~ hire more nurses, retain nurses by pay raises and providing respect for your nurses more often, both new and experienced, maybe buy some wheelchairs...

    I used to try to believe in the 'magnet' then I stopped. What are the real changes? They stay in business by paying for an ideal title? The nurses and doctors all have the same license at other hospitals. Yet this 'magnet' hospital wants to act as if its superior. It's not bad to try to be good but paying for it just doesn't seem ethical.

    Don't hospitals pay big bucks for this? By doing what, cutting nurses and some of the very basic necessities to get the basic job of patient care done efficiently?

    If I'm wrong about buying the designation, let me know. Union vs Non-union is the question in this thread. I apologize for getting sidetracked. The magnet word just sucked me in. Let me go take off this metal armor! It's way too heavy anyhow.
    Sorry, late to respond as I just saw this.

    I think my statement was interpreted the wrong way somewhat. I agree that Magnet designation is never a true and reliable indicator of how good a hospital treats its nurses.

    When I said that "our hospital's Magnet designation is an affirmation of how well we live the ideal in our nursing culture"...I meant that the hospital I work for have always had a "nursing culture" that respects nurses as highly skilled and independent professionals who have a voice in how they should practice even before we received our Magnet designation.

    There is a true collaboration between nurses and other professional here and that's what would attract the kind of nurses who thrive and excel in their specialties. Of course, its not always perfect and we do have some rotten apples like everywhere else but for the most part and in comparison with the other places I've worked at in my 20+ years of nursing career, this place stands out for that reason in my eyes.

  • May 3

    Quote from hppygr8ful
    My daddy used to say....<before leaving ~1.6 million to the kids.>
    My Daddy used to day, "Sure, I'll have another drink..." So not much coming from that end. My mommy's policy is that the last check she writes is sure as crap gonna bounce. So that's zero to me and my siblings. My step-mommy, on the other hand, well, her parents sold their house my step-granddaddy had lived in his ENTIRE life - and they cleared about $200. Don't think that is lasting long though.

    So, looks like I'm working till I drop.

  • May 3

    Quote from elkpark
    It would be enough for me to walk away from my job -- and Sour talked about having the money "all to myself," which I'm reading as after taxes, net.
    My daddy used to say that in order to retire comfortably a couple needed 1 million dollars in the bank by age 65. He did it and he and my mom had a decent worry free retirement living off the interest and never touching the principal which they left to us kids along with another $600, 0000.00 in non liquid asserts. My husband and I just reached the Million threshold this year and our house will be paid off soon but neither one of us is walking away from our jobs any time soon. College tuition for our son looms in the future and we both have a few good years left. I just got about $250,000.00 from my parents estate and am looking for a ranch property to retire to in the Pacific Northwest or possibly fly-over country. Then is cows, horses, dogs and hopefully a grandbaby or two in my future.

    Hppy

  • May 3

    I pretty much agree. Nursing school is hard but just how hard it will be for any particular individual will be just as individual. There was a lot of information to take in. I've been through Paramedic school. That's also a program where you have to try to drink from a firehose. In my case, nursing school was not so bad but it did last a couple years instead of approx. 1 year for medic school. My Sports Med Bachelors was far more rigorous than Nursing School was so that part wasn't too horrible for me. The really hard part was learning to think like a nurse because all my previous training was through the medical model.

    Also while the NCLEX questions themselves weren't (individually) all that difficult, the system it uses made the NCLEX the most difficult/tough exam I've ever had to take. Solid test-taking skills, critical thinking, and a solid nursing school background are all what are needed to pass the NCLEX. Since the NREMT switched to the same type of test (computer adaptive) their exams are also much more difficult than they used to be.

  • May 3

    It was challenging, but I thought the music degree I had begun to pursue was harder. It wasn't the lessons or performances that were so hard, but the philosophy-heavy humanities classes were... although I did attend a private school with high standards. (Example: I took a beginning Latin class at Private College, then transferred to State U for a semester. Their 2nd semester Latin class used the same book, and the semester started halfway through the Private College's 1st semester class.)

    My right brain has some strengths, but I found memorizing info (like for science and pharmacology and nursing skills classes) easier than analyzing music by ear, or easier than analyzing a text written in Middle English.

    What I found challenging about nursing school is 1) the schedule -- we have clinical shifts in addition to classroom, 2) human bodies don't always respond like the book says they do (example: I have had full-on pneumonia with no fever.) and 3) testing with questions that look for the most-correct answer on multiple choice ?s, vs one correct/three incorrect options.

  • May 3

    Quote from Stillthinkin
    Part time job no kids and the gpa level is a 2.5 in the community college. I've never been interested in biology but I do love social sciences
    The GPA may turn out to be a big issue. No interest in biology is not a great thing, either.

  • May 3

    Yes, it really is that hard...depending on what your definition of "hard" is. Nursing school was one of the hardest things I've done in my life. Others will say they breezed through and went to parties on the weekends. Oh and they LOVED their clinical rotations AND their clinical instructors! Me? I disliked it all and studied until my eyes went bad. But then, I'm not the brightest bulb on the tree. The volume of information they expected us to learn in no time was mind boggling. And then the tests were like no other tests I'd taken before and I'd already gotten an undergraduate degree. Not to mention the emotional roller coaster ride they put us on. But I survived. And eventually I even found that despite my intense dislike of nursing school, I love being a nurse.

  • May 3

    Quote from Stillthinkin
    Was was the toughest for you?
    I hate performing physical tasks under pressure (give me an exam or paper any day... just don't ask me to demonstrate x skill while 5 people watch me). Some of the nursing instructors were quite brutal and seemed to be looking for those they deemed unsafe for practice, as opposed to working with you to fulfill course expectations. So that was pretty intimidating. But I got through, and for other people, that performance piece is no problem.

  • May 3

    Quote from Horseshoe
    It all depends. How much raw intelligence do you possess? Do you have the ability to read and memorize large volumes of information and retain that information even after the exam? Do you learn new material easily? Can you organize your study time appropriately, prioritizing according to "hints" professors give you? Can you accurately and quickly do basic math and algebra? Do you do well with timed tests or tasks? Do you take criticism well, or do you get defensive and blame others for your shortcomings? Do you fall apart when taken to task, breaking into tears and making a catastrophe out of critical comment? Do you have a lot of other responsibilities competing with study time? Are you physically fit and able to perform physical tasks associated with nursing? Do you freeze up when having to demonstrate a skill or when asked on the spot a question about something you were supposed to have read or learned?

    How do you handle stress? Can you think on your feet? Can you remain calm in a crisis? Do you have a good amount of common sense? Can you apply "book knowledge" to real life situations? Do you require a lot of direction and hand holding? Are you offended easily by rude or stressed out people (who will be patients, their family members, and other members of the health care team)?

    All of these factors will play into whether or not you find nursing school and actual nursing to be "hard."
    This. ^^ And to be honest, getting good grades and passing the NCLEX aren't all that hard...it's being able to critically think and apply what you've learned to the next situation, and the next, and the next.

  • May 3

    Quote from Stillthinkin
    Part time job no kids and the gpa level is a 2.5 in the community college. I've never been interested in biology but I do love social sciences
    If your GPA is 2.5 you will need to raise it to be a competitive applicant. Unfortunately there are not enough instructors for all the people who wish to be nurses. Getting into school is one of the hardest parts.

  • May 3

    I always have felt that schooling for nursing isn't so much hard as it is voluminous.

    Of course you can do it. Look how many already have.

  • May 3

    Quote from cleback
    Depends. Are your study habits good? Will you have a lot of competing responsibilities in school (family, full time job, etc.)? How competitive is your nursing program (admission rates, GPA)?

    The content is not that hard to grasp, particularly if you're interested in biology and social sciences. What tends to make the program hard is the level of competition for some schools and the fact that returning students have full lives already. I would be realistic in carving out time for studies and developing good study habits early. If you're able to do those things, you should be fine.
    Part time job no kids and the gpa level is a 2.5 in the community college. I've never been interested in biology but I do love social sciences

  • May 3

    It's not hard so much as it a massive amount of information that you have to assimilate in a short period of times. Plus it's not so much just remembering stuff but it's learning how to apply it. Good luck.

  • May 3

    Depends. Are your study habits good? Will you have a lot of competing responsibilities in school (family, full time job, etc.)? How competitive is your nursing program (admission rates, GPA)?

    The content is not that hard to grasp, particularly if you're interested in biology and social sciences. What tends to make the program hard is the level of competition for some schools and the fact that returning students have full lives already. I would be realistic in carving out time for studies and developing good study habits early. If you're able to do those things, you should be fine.

  • May 3

    One bite at a time.. I love that thank you


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