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®Nurse, MSN, RN 15,379 Views

Joined: Feb 26, '08; Posts: 1,141 (63% Liked) ; Likes: 2,962

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  • Jun 6

    I was an RN with years and years of vast nursing experience, spanning the spectrum from Hospice to ICU bedside care, before I became an MSN CNL. There are Many RN's out there who come to the bedside with a new MSN/CNL who have years and years of experience.
    These RN's who go back to college to get their MSN/CNL are steadily growing in number. Additionally, hospitals and other healthcare employment areas are realizing the value of having nurses who are not only adept at taking care of patients at the bedside, but are also highly educated and not stuck in a 'silo of care' focus.
    How am I holding up as a CNL grad? I'm doing awesome! I haven't regretted getting my MSN CNL at all, and consider myself very fortunate to be on the receiving end of a wave that is building towards utilizing more CNL's in my area of the world (Left coast).
    I enjoy the respect of having my MSN degree with a focus in Clinical Nurse Leadership, and no one has ever dared to approach me and stated that a CNL is a worthless investment. Working with students in an RN program, and alongside other RN's at the bedside, I frequently am asked to give impromptu explanations of how they can get to where I am at with my MSN/CNL.
    I am able to enjoy way more job prospects as a MSN versus a BSN in a Magnet hospital, and also am able to teach at a local college because of my MSN degree.
    If I desired to return to college to be, say, an FNP or ACNP if I so desired, I would NOT have to get a second MSN degree. I would just obtain a post masters certificate in the area I desired.
    Life is good - from a happy 28 year old Nurse, and a 4 year old MSN/CNL.

  • Jun 1

    I was a CNA before the Internet, before cell phones.
    I had two small children and a husband who was overseas for active duty.
    No one ever had any problems getting ahold of me because I was at work and could be easily found.
    I went to college for nursing and people could even find me in class!
    I went to clinicals and could be found there too.
    Your proximity to your keys, cell phone, and wallet is a "want", not a "need".
    How will you feel if you are dismissed or disciplined at your job because you could not be separated from them?
    Leave them in your locker.

  • May 26

    What you allow, you condone.

    You are perfectly allowed to be assertive and inform others as to how you wish to be treated. Tell then that the eye rolling and such makes you feel like you work in a hostile work environment and you desire it to stop.

    If their behavior continues, THEN you are perfectly justified in escalating your issues to a higher level.

  • May 24

    I dropped Algebra like a red hot rock when I was in High school because I was sooooo lost in that class. I also had a Horrible HS guidance counselor. Horrible. Horrible. Horrible.

    Neither of my parents went to college, and I didn't know that you could apply for scholarships. I was the only one in my class who didn't have a scholarship (out of 30 classmates). I was so ignorant.

    I wound up getting federal loans later to pay for LPN school. My lack of algebra (and fear of it) kept me from getting my RN when I was 22. I did try and take college level elementary algebra after getting my LPN, but with an unsupportive ex-husband who thought wives shouldn't go to school, two very small children, a full time job, and terrible money problems, I dropped out with an unsuccessful stab at it.

    I then learned from several studies which supported findings that the (it was just one or two studies - but was enough to encourage me) female brain may develop in such a way that the ability to be more successful in algebra comes after the HS years.

    I couldn't get my RN without algebra, so I took elementary and intermediate algebra after having been an LPN for 15 years and I GOT A+'s in both classes! I even went on to take Statistics, and am now finishing up my MSN with a 4.0 average.

    If I was given a time machine, I would go back and tell my younger self to go get a math tutor, go to something like a Sylvan learning center, or anything but letting me convince myself that I couldn't do algebra.

    My advice to you after my story above, is to do a google search of your area to find out what services are available to you in the way of tutoring. Don't rely upon your teacher to hold your hand, because he or she may not have the skills that you need to learn.

    Everyone has the ability to learn, but everyone does not learn the same way. Go find the person(s) in your area that can help you unlock your potential and don't even consider giving up.

  • May 17

    I was an RN with years and years of vast nursing experience, spanning the spectrum from Hospice to ICU bedside care, before I became an MSN CNL. There are Many RN's out there who come to the bedside with a new MSN/CNL who have years and years of experience.
    These RN's who go back to college to get their MSN/CNL are steadily growing in number. Additionally, hospitals and other healthcare employment areas are realizing the value of having nurses who are not only adept at taking care of patients at the bedside, but are also highly educated and not stuck in a 'silo of care' focus.
    How am I holding up as a CNL grad? I'm doing awesome! I haven't regretted getting my MSN CNL at all, and consider myself very fortunate to be on the receiving end of a wave that is building towards utilizing more CNL's in my area of the world (Left coast).
    I enjoy the respect of having my MSN degree with a focus in Clinical Nurse Leadership, and no one has ever dared to approach me and stated that a CNL is a worthless investment. Working with students in an RN program, and alongside other RN's at the bedside, I frequently am asked to give impromptu explanations of how they can get to where I am at with my MSN/CNL.
    I am able to enjoy way more job prospects as a MSN versus a BSN in a Magnet hospital, and also am able to teach at a local college because of my MSN degree.
    If I desired to return to college to be, say, an FNP or ACNP if I so desired, I would NOT have to get a second MSN degree. I would just obtain a post masters certificate in the area I desired.
    Life is good - from a happy 28 year old Nurse, and a 4 year old MSN/CNL.

  • May 1

    Kaiser compiles the latest EBP into an algorithm that the RN uses, along with the nursing process and a heavy dose of critical thinking to work through the patient phone assessment in order to arrive at the safest outcome.
    Even with all of the safe guards built in, if an RN doesn't explore the right symptoms, or has a lapse in "active listening skills", the algorithm will fail.
    You utilize a combination of both to guide your advice.
    You are forbidden from giving advice that is not listed within the established parameters. You cannot "go maverick" with a personal tried-and-true method of addressing an ill. You must only utilize the established evidence based practice methods. (i.e. honey for a continual cough, versus standing on one leg and holding your head back while jumping up and down).
    There is precious little room for creativity, and it gets old, very quickly, taking call after call after call, while regurgitating a rote fix for someone's ills.
    .....and then, there's the special little snowflakes (I don't want to go there....)

  • Apr 22

    Once upon a time, I was shy and reserved. I remember lamenting to my mother how I felt picked on as a new nurse and that I wanted to find a new job. She told me “There will always be people like that no matter where you go, what you do, or who you are, so you might as well learn how to deal with them now."

    Well now.....that was pretty sage advice back then. Unfortunately, I didn’t know how to go about “dealing with them” because I didn’t have the tools to do so. It wasn’t until many years later before I developed a style of dealing with “people like that."

    Might I offer you a shortcut? It’s a book called “Crucial Conversations” tools for talking when the stakes are high. Its VERY informative and was an eye opener for me. I hope it helps you as much as it helped me.

    Crucial Conversations Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High, Second Edition: Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, Al Switzler: 9780071771320: Amazon.com: Books

    http://www.peace.ca/crucialconversations.pdf

  • Mar 27

    Quote from DesiDani
    Or unit secretaries who believe they literally run a unit. These people have no medical training at times and are not certified or licensed, yet they feel they have the authority to tell the RNs what to do.

    I don't get it, why????
    LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL!!!!!!

    What do you think goes on in the "C" Suite?! This describes a typical day for a CEO, CFO, etc.

    At least the unit secretaries are on MY side.

  • Feb 26

    I was an RN with years and years of vast nursing experience, spanning the spectrum from Hospice to ICU bedside care, before I became an MSN CNL. There are Many RN's out there who come to the bedside with a new MSN/CNL who have years and years of experience.
    These RN's who go back to college to get their MSN/CNL are steadily growing in number. Additionally, hospitals and other healthcare employment areas are realizing the value of having nurses who are not only adept at taking care of patients at the bedside, but are also highly educated and not stuck in a 'silo of care' focus.
    How am I holding up as a CNL grad? I'm doing awesome! I haven't regretted getting my MSN CNL at all, and consider myself very fortunate to be on the receiving end of a wave that is building towards utilizing more CNL's in my area of the world (Left coast).
    I enjoy the respect of having my MSN degree with a focus in Clinical Nurse Leadership, and no one has ever dared to approach me and stated that a CNL is a worthless investment. Working with students in an RN program, and alongside other RN's at the bedside, I frequently am asked to give impromptu explanations of how they can get to where I am at with my MSN/CNL.
    I am able to enjoy way more job prospects as a MSN versus a BSN in a Magnet hospital, and also am able to teach at a local college because of my MSN degree.
    If I desired to return to college to be, say, an FNP or ACNP if I so desired, I would NOT have to get a second MSN degree. I would just obtain a post masters certificate in the area I desired.
    Life is good - from a happy 28 year old Nurse, and a 4 year old MSN/CNL.

  • Feb 24

    I was an RN with years and years of vast nursing experience, spanning the spectrum from Hospice to ICU bedside care, before I became an MSN CNL. There are Many RN's out there who come to the bedside with a new MSN/CNL who have years and years of experience.
    These RN's who go back to college to get their MSN/CNL are steadily growing in number. Additionally, hospitals and other healthcare employment areas are realizing the value of having nurses who are not only adept at taking care of patients at the bedside, but are also highly educated and not stuck in a 'silo of care' focus.
    How am I holding up as a CNL grad? I'm doing awesome! I haven't regretted getting my MSN CNL at all, and consider myself very fortunate to be on the receiving end of a wave that is building towards utilizing more CNL's in my area of the world (Left coast).
    I enjoy the respect of having my MSN degree with a focus in Clinical Nurse Leadership, and no one has ever dared to approach me and stated that a CNL is a worthless investment. Working with students in an RN program, and alongside other RN's at the bedside, I frequently am asked to give impromptu explanations of how they can get to where I am at with my MSN/CNL.
    I am able to enjoy way more job prospects as a MSN versus a BSN in a Magnet hospital, and also am able to teach at a local college because of my MSN degree.
    If I desired to return to college to be, say, an FNP or ACNP if I so desired, I would NOT have to get a second MSN degree. I would just obtain a post masters certificate in the area I desired.
    Life is good - from a happy 28 year old Nurse, and a 4 year old MSN/CNL.

  • Feb 16

    Quote from AccelCNL2b16
    I am presently enrolled in direct entry CNL program. I already plan on working at the bedside after graduation. I know that my degree my bestow me with a BSN but I will need actual work experience. Personally, I think my program in no different than direct entry NP programs. Yes, I know that I will not graduate with a specialization. However, new graduates of direct entry NP programs ( depending on the setup of the program) will never have worked as a RN much less as an NP ( outside of school based clinical hours). Does that mean they are not competent? Not necessarily, they just need clinical work experience. Right now CNL is the new kid on the block and there is a bit of fear, misunderstanding, and lack of information where it is concerned.

    As a CNL I will not be a nurse manager or unit leader. I will simply be making sure that all the people in the health care team are working for the best favor of the patient and other roles. I know I want to work at the bedside and eventually I know I want to become an NP but I plan on honing my skills on the floor. I think direct entry CNL programs are great for those who do not know what specialization they wish to enter or simply do not want to enter a particular NP field so early in their career.
    Hi Accel - Congratulations on your career choice. I am also a CNL student; however, I have been an RN for many years. I am learning more and more about the CNL role, and I would STRONGLY recommend that you locate a local CNLA Chapter and get involved. Clinical Nurse Leader Association (CNLA)

    I assume that the “BSN” degree is a typo because the AACN requires that the CNL education be within an MSN program in order to qualify to sit for the CNL exam.


    As an aside, if your CNL program curriculum provides for the “Three P’s” (Advanced Pharmacology, Advanced Pathophysiology, and Advanced Physical Assessment), you should enjoy a seamless transition into an NP program for a “Post Masters Certificate Program.” From all the research that I have done for my personal information, I can share that I have learned that you should have (roughly) about 18-24 more credits to complete in your PMCP in order to graduate from an NP program. (18, in my case).


    I would like to clarify one point in that, as a CNL; you will be a unit leader. Patient safety is your main priority. Although you may need to come up to speed on patient care activities, time management, and documentation specifics, you will be far ahead of the game. So don’t sell yourself short! You will be learning skills that all new grads need to learn as a general rule, but you will be learning them through the filter of a Masters Prepared Clinical Nurse Leader.

  • Feb 12

    This may help answer some of your questions: CDC - Safe Patient Handling and Movement (SPHM) - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic


    Preventing Back Injuries in Health Care Settings | NIOSH Science Blog | Blogs | CDC



    To put it simply, it is usually not one single episode of heavy lifting. If you’ve ever heard the story about holding a glass of water, it is very relevant: "[FONT=verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif][COLOR=#292f34]A psychologist walked around a room while teaching stress management to an audience. As she raised a glass of water, everyone expected they'd be asked the "half empty or half full" question. Instead, with a smile on her face, she inquired: "How heavy is this glass of water?" Answers called out ranged from 8 oz. to 20 oz. She replied, "The absolute weight doesn't matter. It depends on how long I hold it. If I hold it for a minute, it's not a problem. If I hold it for an hour, I'll have an ache in my arm. If I hold it for a day, my arm will feel numb and paralyzed. In each case, the weight of the glass doesn't change, but the longer I hold it, the heavier it becomes." She continued, "The stresses and worries in life are like that glass of water. Think about them for a while and nothing happens. Think about them a bit longer and they begin to hurt. And if you think about them all day long, you will feel paralyzed – incapable of doing anything." It’s important to remember to let go of your stresses. As early in the evening as you can, put all your burdens down. Don't carry them through the evening and into the night. Remember to put the glass down!”[/COLOR][/FONT]
    [FONT=verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif][COLOR=#292f34]Reference : [/COLOR][/FONT]https://www.reddit.com/r/GetMotivated/comments/19bn9s/how_heavy_is_your_glass_of_water/

  • Jan 28

    I've worked for a trauma center hospital that was non-Magnet when I started. After being an floor nurse for three years, they decided to pursue Magnet status.
    Shared Governance was brought on scene, "shared decision making", Team Cooperation, how-to-treat-and-respond to your coworker.
    It was an interesting journey, to be sure.
    Experts were brought in, consultants were consulted, and so on, and so forth.
    The final (requisite) step was an accounting of BSN's and ADN's.
    If your hospital does not have 80% of their staff with a BSN or higher, things may really start to suck in a big way for the ADN's on staff.
    My hospital closely watched the "BSN - meter", and when the tipping point didn't happen by the required target date, they decided that if the ADN's didn't go back to school by "x" time, they would be fired.

    We eventually got Magnet status.
    A LOT of ADN's went back to school for their MSN's ~ like, A LOT.

    Now we have all these MSN's running around, working at the bedside, leaving the bedside, and the staffing shortages are horrific.

    Many RN's had limited options until they got their MSN's. Then the sky was the limit for them once they graduated. A fantastic proportion of them left to be all that they could be.

    Magnet means that the nurses who are forced to go back to school, can now say goodbye to their current position if they choose.

    See, the real thing is this:

    In order to achieve Magnet status, you have GOT to have a lot of leadership.
    Cue the Managers, and Directors, and Quality, and on, and on, and on.

    Then, you have the staff return to school for BSN or higher.

    However, there is now very little upward mobility, because the positions have all been filled from outside.

    Where do you go with a new MSN, or BSN degree, and a good amount of nursing experience if you aren't allowed to be anywhere but the bedside?

    (That's a rhetorical question, of course: You leave!).

  • Jan 27

    I've worked for a trauma center hospital that was non-Magnet when I started. After being an floor nurse for three years, they decided to pursue Magnet status.
    Shared Governance was brought on scene, "shared decision making", Team Cooperation, how-to-treat-and-respond to your coworker.
    It was an interesting journey, to be sure.
    Experts were brought in, consultants were consulted, and so on, and so forth.
    The final (requisite) step was an accounting of BSN's and ADN's.
    If your hospital does not have 80% of their staff with a BSN or higher, things may really start to suck in a big way for the ADN's on staff.
    My hospital closely watched the "BSN - meter", and when the tipping point didn't happen by the required target date, they decided that if the ADN's didn't go back to school by "x" time, they would be fired.

    We eventually got Magnet status.
    A LOT of ADN's went back to school for their MSN's ~ like, A LOT.

    Now we have all these MSN's running around, working at the bedside, leaving the bedside, and the staffing shortages are horrific.

    Many RN's had limited options until they got their MSN's. Then the sky was the limit for them once they graduated. A fantastic proportion of them left to be all that they could be.

    Magnet means that the nurses who are forced to go back to school, can now say goodbye to their current position if they choose.

    See, the real thing is this:

    In order to achieve Magnet status, you have GOT to have a lot of leadership.
    Cue the Managers, and Directors, and Quality, and on, and on, and on.

    Then, you have the staff return to school for BSN or higher.

    However, there is now very little upward mobility, because the positions have all been filled from outside.

    Where do you go with a new MSN, or BSN degree, and a good amount of nursing experience if you aren't allowed to be anywhere but the bedside?

    (That's a rhetorical question, of course: You leave!).

  • Jan 26

    I've worked for a trauma center hospital that was non-Magnet when I started. After being an floor nurse for three years, they decided to pursue Magnet status.
    Shared Governance was brought on scene, "shared decision making", Team Cooperation, how-to-treat-and-respond to your coworker.
    It was an interesting journey, to be sure.
    Experts were brought in, consultants were consulted, and so on, and so forth.
    The final (requisite) step was an accounting of BSN's and ADN's.
    If your hospital does not have 80% of their staff with a BSN or higher, things may really start to suck in a big way for the ADN's on staff.
    My hospital closely watched the "BSN - meter", and when the tipping point didn't happen by the required target date, they decided that if the ADN's didn't go back to school by "x" time, they would be fired.

    We eventually got Magnet status.
    A LOT of ADN's went back to school for their MSN's ~ like, A LOT.

    Now we have all these MSN's running around, working at the bedside, leaving the bedside, and the staffing shortages are horrific.

    Many RN's had limited options until they got their MSN's. Then the sky was the limit for them once they graduated. A fantastic proportion of them left to be all that they could be.

    Magnet means that the nurses who are forced to go back to school, can now say goodbye to their current position if they choose.

    See, the real thing is this:

    In order to achieve Magnet status, you have GOT to have a lot of leadership.
    Cue the Managers, and Directors, and Quality, and on, and on, and on.

    Then, you have the staff return to school for BSN or higher.

    However, there is now very little upward mobility, because the positions have all been filled from outside.

    Where do you go with a new MSN, or BSN degree, and a good amount of nursing experience if you aren't allowed to be anywhere but the bedside?

    (That's a rhetorical question, of course: You leave!).


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