Latest Comments by txsugarlvn

txsugarlvn 2,074 Views

Joined: Feb 4, '03; Posts: 87 (2% Liked) ; Likes: 2

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    That's a shame you can't make it to San Marcos. I live just outside San Antonio but went to school in San Marcos (SWT!).
    Since you don't speak English, your services would be of use in Texas because of the large population of Spanish speaking people. I'm not sure how much of a need there is for fluent Spanish speakers in San Marcos but it is close to Seguin which would increase the need. The greatest need is closer down to the border and in the valley. Laredo, Uvalde, Brownsville and the surrounding areas. South Padre Island is very close to the border as well and you have access to the beach all year long.
    I guess it depends on what you are looking for. Why did you choose San Marcos? It's a great town but it's small and your job options would more than likely be out of town, say Austin, Seguin, New Braunfels or even San Antonio. Just curious...
    Maybe once you sell your house or the year is up, you can come and check Texas out for yourself. Yes, we get humid but in no way are we as humid as Florida or Louisianna. We are a great state. You'd like it here.

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    I took my boards for my LVN license back in 1995 and I was required to give my fingerprints when I went to test. So was everyone else that was testing at the same time.
    I think the state is requiring fingerprints because of the issues that have come up regarding patient safety and care. There have been stories of patient's dying at the hands of the nurse and the nurse working under a false license so someone else gets the blame until the truth comes out about who the nurse actually is, etc.
    My husband agrees with the "big brother" situation that you all talk about. I do not. But where do you draw the line? I mean, where do you say "That's enough info". For each instance, an example for and against it can be brought up to defend each side.
    I agree with the fingerprinting of nurses. The lives of patients are in our hands (both LVN's and RN's) every day.
    As for the dialysis techs, I agree with the original poster. They shouldn't be allowed to administer ANYTHING via IV or meds in general. They aren't trained for it. I've worked dialysis and it was a 2 week training course for all involved (RN's LVN's and Techs) and techs are allowed to administer heparin via iv (which they draw up themselves) and normal saline as they deem fit when the patient seems to need it or to flush the lines.
    Craziness!

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    WOW! I just heard a story on NPR about the nursing shortage in California. The reporter stated that California has passed a law that requires all hospitals to have one RN on duty for every 6 patients, no exceptions. So, hospitals are scrambling to try to hire additional nurses. California, the reporter said, is the state with the worst nursing shortage in the US and is already having a hard enough time finding nurses without the new law going into place. Apparently, the hospitals have to be staffed by January 1, 2004.
    They talked to an agency who is doing business in California and is trying to recruit RN's from all over the place. They cover from the state line of Oregon all the way down California to Tijuana. (sp?)
    Anyway, the stunning part to me was the pay scale they are using! They are paying $55/hr for RN's. If you work 12 hour shifts, you get $65/hr. If you work holidays/evenings/weekends, they are paying $90/hour!
    They also talked to a few hospital administrators and the like who each explained what they are doing to attract and retain nurses. Some are offering moving expenses, apartments with free cable free utilities and fully furnished, vehicles for the nurses to use free of charge and huge sign on bonuses starting from $7K and up.
    I know there is a downside to nursing and this post is not about that or even asking for any responses related to the downside etc etc. Please, save the flaming for someone else. I was just amazed at the $$$$ and the lengths employers in California are going to.
    Man, I knew I should have listened to my mom when she said to finish RN school. :chuckle

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    The questions aren't dumb at all! It's great you are making an effort to educate yourself and find out more about charting.
    In all the facilities I have worked (nursing home, dialysis, hospital, etc) we have charted in black ink only. Back long ago, many many years, charting was done in a different color for each shift. This changed because of legal problems. When xeroxing the patient's chart, red and green don't show up very well and neither does blue ink. So, the standard was changed to black ink only. I don't know about other states. I'm in Texas. Or even about other cities in Texas but from understanding, black is the standard for San Antonio.
    What to chart? This depends on the facility as to how in depth they want you to go. I've had some say I charted too much and it put the facility "at risk". The facility will always protect itself so be sure YOU protect your own behind. Don't write a book but chart pertinent info and be precise. For instance, if you check on a resident (or patient) and they are asleep, don't just write "patient sleeping". You have to be more precise. One facility I worked at said to write it more like this: "1630 Resident appears to be sleeping. Eyes closed. Breathing even and steady."
    The same for charting their intake at meals. Don't just write "Ate well" or "Ate poorly". Some places have a chart with percentages and examples of how to determine those so you can chart more precisely the amount the patient or resident ate. (25%, 50%, etc)
    The only time we used colors, was with highlighters. Each shift was assigned a specific color (pink, green and blue) and the times for the treatments would be highlighted as well as the medications. It helped as a quick reference when flipping through the treatment books to be sure you caught everything to be done on your shift.

    Check out Western Schools. They have a CEU course that is all about charting. You could also do a web search to find sites and info dedicated to this very topic that could show you different types of charting and what should and should not be included. Even samples of each.

    For your own record, document everything. Buy a small notebook or tablet where you can write your own experiences and observations along with dates and times to have your own record at home. This is invaluable should any discrepancies occur or you get called into court to testify, etc.
    Just my opinion.

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    At one of my employers, they would post a list. Each nurse for the unit would write their choice in order of 1st, 2nd, 3rd and the DON would then assign the holidays. If you got Christmas one year, you couldn't have it the next year unless someone was willing to trade with your for New Year's Eve or Thanksgiving. We tried to be very fair. What we tried to do was talk to each other and work out which one we wanted most so we could write it out as we preferred it. The DON loved it because we all tried to be diplomatic about it.
    I don't have children (yet) but I used to resent those who used the children as an excuse for leaving early,coming late, getting every weekend off, not working holidays. I can understand emergencies or special events or the like. The thing is, with nursing, you don't really get to pick and choose unless you work agency or per diem. Whether you have children or not shouldn't matter. I hope that when I finally do have children, I keep in mind not to use my children as an excuse for not wanting to work Christmas Day or the weekend. I'll just say "because I don't want to!" LOL....
    On a side note, I had planned on moving back into nursing full time but I told my husband "not until after the holidays!" because I know as a newbie in a facility, I will get to work the holidays whole those with seniority take them off. Only fair! So, since I want my holidays (and where I work...insurance company) I get all of them including the day after each one, I'll wait it out. LOL!

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    Rustyhammer, I think it's wonderful that the NM BON recognizes the abilities of the LVN and don't just see us an "assistant" to the RN. I'm not devaluing an RN's knowledge but it's time the States recognize that LVN's can be trained to perform more than perfunctory duties or work as a clerical assistant with the extra fun of administering medications. Hurrah!
    Forgive my cynicysm....it comes with years of experience.
    Thanks for the written proof from the NM LVN scope of practice guidelines.
    Oh yes, and for those who still question, please be sure to note in the guidelines that an LVN must be trained and certified to perform the duties and is also under the supervision/direction of an RN. This really frees up the RN to perform many of the duties they otherwise don't have time for which, in my humble opinion, increases the quality of care.

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    i recommend taking the job if you can handle the hours along with going to school. At our area training hospital, one of the best in the country, the PCT's are taught not only basic skills but also to draw blood (they get certified to be used in a pinch), assessment skills, some have even learned how to cath patients and alot more. True some it goes beyond the scope of their job description but they are taught by the staff nurses so they can assist if necessary although they are never allowed to do it alone. The experience and training is invaluable and you will truly reap the benefits as you go through nursing school and afterwards. Many nurses graduate without knowing much of this stuff and have to learn on the job. I wish you much luck!

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    My 2 cents....
    1. I believe over 50% of nurses are overweight to an unhealthy extent. From my personal observations.
    2. Many people I currently work with, including myself, are obviously overweight.
    3. The extended hours combined with staff shortages result in "fast food" becoming the norm rather than the treat every now and then. It's easier to grab something quick that you can eat on the way or drink a soda for the fast energy sugar boost than to sit down and eat a nutritious meal, etc. Since I started nursing (nearly 9 years now) I have gained 30+ pounds. My own fault, yes, so please save your soapbox messages for someone else.
    4. I believe being overweight, obviously overweight, does interfere with the nurse's credibility and professional image. Studies have been done showing that people who are considered "fit" or are within a normal weight range have a greater chance of being hired, getting a promotion, etc. Plus, they are seen as more capable whereas the overweight are not. Think about the overweight fireman, paramedic, or policeman...I have overheard comments such as "how could he/she chase a criminal if they can't even walk without breathing hard?" "how can he/she save someone's life if they can't even get down on the ground to perform cpr, etc?" Same goes for nursing.
    All that being said, I do believe you need to make a personal commitment to make a change. Not dieting, not a super rigid exercise routine, nothing drastic. You didn't gain the weight overnight so it's not going to come off overnight. Plus, the weight stayed on because of the habits you had formed (poor nutrition, junk food, stress eating). Naturally, if the weight is to come off, you have to form new habits that are good for you.
    I'm working to change my life by looking at what triggers me to eat when I'm not hungry, drinking lots more water, finding exercises and routines that I enjoy and will stick with, and planning ahead for meals. Maybe I still won't have the time to sit down but I can at least eat something and drink things that are good for me. I just have to stick with it even when it's hard.
    I wish you the best and much success in your changes. It's difficult but it can be done. ***HUGS***

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    Do any of you know of facilities in San Antonio or the surrounding areas that offer the Baylor Plan? any info would be great!
    Thanks!

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    Hi everyone, I interviewed yesterday and was hired, for a hospice agency in town. They actually do supplemental staffing to the main hospice agencies in town (Vitas, Vista Care, etc). I am really unsure of what to expect. I will be working part-time on an availability basis because I currently have a full time job. I asked questions about the safety of working in the home, etc but I am still wondering about things. Especially after reading some of the postings.
    For instance, my orientation was a walk-through of the handbook with the director highlighting important points and pages to read. Nothing else. I was asked for my availability and told them Saturday the 26th would my next available date.
    The director told me I would be in contact with the primary hospice agency as well as my agency should any needs arise. Have any of you had experience with this type of situation? The goal of the company is to be sure care is always provided and a family is not left alone simply because there is not enough staff. That's where nurses like me come in. This will be my first foray into the whole hospice realm with the exception of hospice patients I cared for while working LTC. In the facility, I was the primary hospice nurse (as well as charge nurse) for the residents whose families did not have hospice nurses. CNA's would come in to bathe etc every morning but the nursing duty was primarily whoever was charge that day.
    Whew...long story. For those of you who have experience with hospice (I believe this is a for-profit agency) what advice or thoughts can you offer me? Is this a good decision to make? Any ideas/advice/thoughts etc that you have would be accepted graciously and very much appreciated.
    Thanks!

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    wannabnurse...alot of it has to do with the area of the country you work in and the area of nursing you choose. Fortunately, as another posted wrote, nursing gives you the option to move into different areas so you can try them out to find the one you like. I personally love geriatrics (I've tried ob/gyn in an office, med/surg, and dialysis). But, to each his/her own. Other nurses on here love ER or OR or ICU. It's all up to you.
    You'll have your bad days and good days but you know what? there are tons of jobs out there in different places from home care to facilities to research etc. The world is wide open! If you truly want to go into nursing, I say go for it! I wish you the best of luck for school.
    jmel...I stopped to think about your question and realized the funniest thing. I was sick less time when I worked full time as a nurse (hands-on) as I do now working in an office as a health insurance claims auditor. Odd isn't it? I was healthier then than now. I guess I was just too busy to get sick and now I have too much free time. LOL... Other than the odd cold (which was barely once a year) I didn't have any problems. HAND WASHING!! The one thing that did bother me was aching legs and feet. Not all days but some days, goodness, I just went home and put my feet and sighed. My husband is a doll and would massage them but I strongly suggest investing in some good shoes and a massaging foot whirpool to have at home for those "on your feet all day" kind of days.
    Each category of nursing that you listed has it's own complaints with money, respect, hours, stress, etc. I'm sure each one could give you a list of pros and cons for their chosen field. As an LVN, sure I wish I got more respect. People see RN's as "real nurse" and LVN's as gloried CNA's but don't let that get you down. Prove yourself and your skills and believe me, you'll get the respect you deserve. I wish you the best of luck in school also!

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    amen to that Colleen! I went community college as well and paid less than $3K for the whole program including books and uniforms.

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    veedot, I'm not sure about your state but in Texas no one is allowed to sit for the NCLEX without completing the required number of hours and graduating from an accredited program. There are no exceptions even if you feel you have the knowledge to pass the exam. Hopefully you will be able to find another school where you can start again. More than likely however, since you left on bad terms from your previous school, you will have to start at the beginning. I am unsure as to whether your grades and coursework will be "credited" by the old school to transfer to the new. Have you considered checking to see if there is a community college program there? They are MUCH less expensive, same length of time, and many times they offer a more quality education than those expensive schools. That may be an option.
    As for the school loan, it must be paid back. The government requires it (if it's a Stafford or other type of government loan) and will default you for non-payment. This can lead to garnishment of wages, law suits, etc. The best thing to do is speak with the loan office (there is usually a 1-800 # to call or speak with the financial aid desk at your school for contact info) to determine payment arrangements. Most loans agree to a period of time of six months to a year before payments begin to allow you time to find work and get settled. There is also the option of paying in a hardship status. This is where your payments would begin at a low amount and steadily increase over time. This allows you to work and pay more as your pay increases.
    As terrible as you feel, you need to focus on the future and what you can do to redeem yourself. Regardless of whether you cheated or not, your reputation is tarnished and you are now labeled. You will have to work to gain the trust of any future schools and employers. If the other person did in fact lie, their deceit will come back to them and repay them.
    I wish you the best and hope you are able to come to a positive resolution with all of this.

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    Wow, that's pretty sad. I am not sure that California will be so understanding as to let the 3rd violation go by with a fine, some classes, etc. I know the laws here in Texas are tougher but there are still some who slip through the cracks. I can understand that you have a problem with addiction. And I read your post about how this is the last time and you will never drink again it was just a slip and so forth. But, the 3rd violation was on July 4th??? Today is the 11th. That's 7 days since the DUI. A week does not a changed person make.
    I truly hope you are sincere about making a change and sticking with it. Getting not only counseling but a sponsor who will keep you straight when having a family hasn't done it for you. Is a DUI simply drinking and driving? I was under the impression that DUI meant Driving under the influence which included alcohol or drugs (legal/illegal) which impaired your judgement. From my understanding, a DWI is driving while intoxicated and a DUI is driving under the influence. I'm not sure how other states differentiate. Either way it's still wrong and dangerous.
    I wish you the best but I hope you take some off from going into nursing school. You need to get your life back in order. Also, jumping through the hoops, as you stated in a previous post, is the least you can do to get it together. You should be more concerned with fixing yourself instead of just fixing your situation to convince the BON and the school to let you in.
    You're in my prayers. I hope you are led to make the right decision.

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    I took the survey without any problems. I agree with Zee_Rn. We need to look more professional. I hate being mistaken for a dental assistant or some other healthcare worker simply because I am in scrubs. I WANT people to recognize that I am a nurse. I have nothing against other healthcare professionals but I am a nurse and want my uniform to reflect that.
    The hat thing...hey, as "cute" as it is, I think it's totally no do-able. We have enough hands on work to do without working about knocking our hats off or getting them dirty etc. God bless the Florence Nightingale and the original nurses because how they managed to care for the sick and wounded while staying crisp and white and keeping their hats on is beyond me. I'm lucky if I get through a shift without getting something on my uniform.


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