Latest Comments by Ahhphoey

Ahhphoey, ADN, BSN, MSN, CNS 6,698 Views

Joined: Apr 28, '02; Posts: 385 (32% Liked) ; Likes: 227
RN; from US
Specialty: 16 year(s) of experience in ICU, M/S,Nurse Supervisor, CNS

Sorted By Last Comment (Max 500)
  • 0

    I have a friend (an RN, but not a CNS) who works from home for an insurance company as a CM, but she has set hours. I have a second job working from home for an online university, though, with very flexible hours.

  • 1
    sbj101 likes this.

    I've been a CNS for a little over 2 years and am salary, but make $40.15 an hour. I think I was at 37 or 38 when I started. This is in Virginia.

  • 3

    The students at my hospital are allowed to perform tasks with either their instructor or, with the permission of the instructor, with one of our RNs.

  • 0

    I'm so sorry for your loss and that you were placed in a position to have to make such a decision

  • 1
    traumaRUs likes this.

    I took the adult-gero CNS exam offered by AACN and it actually came with a free online review course when you registered to take the exam. To supplement that, though, I some CCRN and PCCN study guides just to cement some of the clinical items (some of which were of on the exam!) and utilized the test blueprint to guide me in studying specifics around my own areas of weakness. I took the exam in October 2014 and was successful using these resources.

  • 0

    I know this thread is old, but I work at a 550 need level 1 trauma center Magnet designated hospital. Our current and most recent CNOs both had women's health back rounds almost exclusively.

  • 1
    SHGR likes this.

    I recently graduated a post masters program and took AACN'S ACCNS-AG in October. Fortunately, AACN offered a free review course when you register for that particular exam.

  • 2
    Amy'sGrandbaby and traumaRUs like this.

    Congratulations! I finished in August and took and passed the exam in October so I know just what you're feeling! Completing the program was a very challenging and rewarding experience, but I'm so glad it's over!

  • 0

    There is also a sticky at the top of this general nursing board with 7 pages worth of a glossary of nursing and medical certifications and acronyms

  • 0

    I'm currently in a post-masters adult-gero CNS program with hopes of finishing next summer.

  • 0

    I'm in the same predicament. I've talked to my director and my tentative plan is to use some PTO time, but mostly some creative scheduling (i.e. Doing 4-6 hrs clinical, then.getting in my 8 hrs of work after since I'm doing clinical in the same building). I thought about going back to the bedside also but these positions are hard to come by in this area so I'd be better off staying where I'm at.

  • 0

    I've worked various areas since becoming a nurse. Honestly, I would suggest going after what ultimately appeals to you most. Regardless, you don't have to stay in that position forever if you don't like it...just try something different. This is the good thing about nursing-variety. I've worked for the same organization for 7 years now and I'm in my 4th position with them. When I needed a new challenge or something different, I'd just get to looking on the job postings and apply for something else while still remaining with the same employer. Fortunately, its a large system with 10 hospitals, plus some nursing homes, rehab centers, doctors offices, an insurance company, etc.

  • 0

    1:6 is pretty normal for med-surg. I used to take between 5-8 patients on day shift when I worked med-surg and that was about 5 years ago, so a max of 6 is pretty sweet.

  • 0

    I wouldn't do it. I have a full time job, but also a per diem job on the side. Although I usually get all of the hours I sign up for (which is only about 24 a month), I've been put on call for every shift I've signed up for over the last 6 weeks. But, thats just the way the census goes sometimes-up and down; this has happened several times over the four years I've been with the per diem job. You'll likely be the first person put on call when low census strikes so you really don't want to uproot your family for such a shaky position. Five months seems like forever, but like others have said, this job really isn't worth the relocation at this point.

  • 0

    Great thread! I've only recently heard of the CNL title and had originally thought it was just a certification and not a MSN education track. I'm currently working on a post masters CNS and was very leery about pursuing it. In fact, I started to do the NP track instead just because of the job outlook, but I really thought about it and realized that's absolutely not what I want to do. I work in a sort of psuedo-CNS role my employter created to get more CNS's and can honestly say I almost love my job...almost, lol! BUT, this is a large, Magnet-designated teaching hospital that is all about nurses doing research and promoting EBP.

    Several hospitals in my area have just began to hire CNS's in the last several years, but I believe they are also pursuing Magnet desgination. I also haven't yet seen the CNL role popping up here just yet (I'm in the mid Atlantic area), but there are probably positions that are similar to the CNL role with a different title. I hope this doesn't offend, but the description posted earlier in the thread sounds like a sort of our clinical coordinator/assistant manager type role. Some of the duties described are what our clinical manger assistants do right now and our CNS/psuedo-CNS person assists with these duties as needed on their assigned units in addition to working on hospital and system level projects.

    Either way, I wish those working on their CNL the best of luck and would be very interested in what type of role and responsibilities they take on with their first CNL position.


close