Latest Comments by sming

sming 812 Views

Joined: Dec 9, '06; Posts: 13 (0% Liked)

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    I could e-mail you a copy of a project I did. It is a cd from very basic to advanced, and i am not sure if i could e-mail it to you from the site

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    I hear you!

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    Hang in there, know your drugs inside and out, know the proceedures and what you are expected to do. Don't take it personal, like sombody else said it is not forever. We all have had an instructor from hell, but you know after about 10, 15 years if your still in nursing you may look back, and see that she or he may have been the best thing for you. I was just talking the other day about a Miss McIntosh, everybody had diarrhea with her, she was tough, but, I now appreciate it, I think she was aware of what she was doing, I had a real tough time with her, and really felt she was out to get me out. I stuck to my guns, studied and studied, I was ready for any question she could through at me. Now after all these years, I can say she was a very good instructor. I hated her, but thanks I give to her, funny eh!

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    As for second had smoke, the science for second had smoke from any source is poor science to begin with. There are far to many variables to be able to make a decisive interpretation. At best one can only say that it may be a contributing cause. There are many people who have not been around second hand smoke but have problems associated with second had smoke, and then you have people because of where they work, bar, and they live to be very old with no symptoms. If the science was not so full of politically correct bull, we might be able to come up with what is actually going on. Cancer is on the increase, and I dare say it is not all from smoking or being around second hand smoke. By 2050 if all stays the way it is now, nobody will be able to eat anything from our oceans, and you cannot blame that on cig, or pot. We are polluting this small world for all of our wants and so called needs. So if you smoke cigs, or pot, it won't matter much in a very short while. Mother earth will show her ungly head soon a be rid of most of us.

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    I smoke, and I am not embarassed, I do a lot of other healthy things, and if I do quite smoking it will be more for finacial reasons rather than health. Shame is only going to make you feel bad, if you smoke, smoke, and enjoy it, don't ride yourself you will just smoke more. When you are ready to quit you will. It takes about 12 attempts to stop, and after you stop you will have occation to want them. It will never go away'.

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    yes, write up the incident report in a non punaitive way. What are the contributing causes, in most cases nothing is going to happen. If you get shy about doing this, somthing tragic could happen out of fear or apprehension. I had a patient that had a bleeding problem quite awhile back in my career, he was the exact person you did not want to screw up with his coagulation. I hung heparin he was on it but at a low dose, when I put into the maching iv pump the rate it was wrong, I was rushed, the whole bag 25000 units went in, thank god he did not bleed. I went to the doctor told him what had happened, we took blood work, and gave the patient corrective measures, and told the patient togeather what had happened. Mistakes are going to happen, more people die each year because of this, and studies are being done all the time to try and prevent them from happening. Being up front and immediate is the most important thing to do, I did not want this man to bleed from my mistake and if I kept my mouth shut, he may have bled, and then how would I have felt. By the way the patient was not upset with the event, he was relieved that our actions showed him how much we cared.

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    I have given meds early, but it depends on the situation, and what the meds are. I work in a busy CCU unit, and if I have a heart rate that is much higher than it should be in a fresh MI, I would give the oral beta blockers and let the MD know, and I chart in my notes what I have done. In the MAR I put the time in as to the time they were given with an nn see nursing notes
    In the morning, if all the pills are od, and I am giving an pre meal med, I see nothing wrong in giving them all at the same time
    Then on other occations, if I am giving three meds that all affect the blood preasure, I will stagger them. All is charted and up front, it is an individual decision, for individual situations and a bit of common sence. One must know the drugs inside out as to what there effects are etc. and ya if a patient is sleeping early I see no problem of giving them early if there are no indications not to do so. These people the patient has to go home and be complient. If a scheduale is too ridgid and too complicated the patient is going to go home and miss medicate themselves

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    I could not tell you the number of codes I have been involved in. I work in a CCU and at the begining of my career we seemed to have them much more often than now. I work with people who have never been in a code, myself I have had on two occations start it on the street, now that was a big addrenalin rush. I am now working half in the CCU and half as the critical care response team, which has show by some statistics helps reduse the number of codes on the floor. Just remember your ABC's and reamain calm, panic and all hell seems to break loose. If you are nervous take the compressions, you can observe what all the other people are doing around you.

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    I am 50 nursing since 1976 LPN at first then an RN and the got my degree in 2000. I have feelings of burn out that come and go. I still love being a nurse. I get a lot of personal cards from former patients, which are wonderful to get. I love making the smallist of difference. I like to make my patient laugh or a family member laugh. Most of my frustration comes from working with people who do not do there part. You can't do your job well and the try to fix all the other problems. But, the patient is not yours and they are uncomfortable and you are cought. So while that nurse is gone on their break you slip in and clean up their patient, and then you are mad. If I end up doing that which I do, I say to myself I am doing it for the care of another human being I am not doing it for them. I hope from my actions the other nurse gets the message, and if they don't, I still did it for the patient and not them. I am also begining to realize close to my retirement that primary care nursing is a failure, I started nursing under the team model, which had its problems, but we got the work done, nobody worked alone, and we seemed to laugh a lot, and perhaps that was just being young. Team nursing you never made a bed by yourself, you washed patients togeather and the work of the day was done early giving lots of time for charting and being with the patient and family teaching them this and that.

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    Hi, I can understand your feelings. In my LPN classes years ago we did our assessments on one another. It was a old instructor who got upset with one of us two guys, doing an assessment with one of our female counterparts. It was not upsetting to us at the time. In my RN program we examined real patients with real problems, this seemed to make more sense to me. We did practice injections on one another which the school did stop. As for what you are feeling, I agree other methods could be used in how to assess without having to strip down. I am sure if you spoke with other class mates you are not alone, and being a student, and wanting a change is a steep hill to climb. Since you are all fairly healthy normal people, you won't see the divergence from the healthy in most cases with class mates, but there could be sombody in your class with some genetic disorder which they may like to keep private. Use of a good quality dummy could be an easy tool to switch to. That probably won't change while you are going through it, it may change for a class behind you and you will be long finished this part of your training. So you have to ask yourself a few questions, is it worth rocking the boat, or to just keep quiet and continue with what has always been. If you are firm with your feelings and emotions question those, what is your motive, where are your feelings comming from, and if you still find that what you are feeling is valid speak to the powerers to be in a calm fashion. You may want to do a little research and present your finding to the faculty. I am sure there are lots of shcools that don't use this teaching model that is causing you some grief. There are some real good sophisticated dummys on the market, that can be programed to do things and teach you.:angryfire

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    I have 17 years experience in the Coronary Care Unit at St. Michael's hospital in Toronto. I have also joined a critical care respose team, will be starting my third week of orientation this Monday Dec. 11th. Am learning so many new things and a huge brain strech and I am a bit nervous myself. What I am learning which helps the most, is to be calm. I find I get most flustered when I lack a working knowledge of the situation. These past two weeks I am walking into a room which is already in a slight bit of panic, and the best way to deal with it, is to be calm. Colaborate, focus on the patient, and if something is being tried, are you getting the desired effect. Yes, No re-evaluate,,,,there are many situations, that there is more than one direction to go. So what is the patient doing when things are being attempted to break the downward spiral. There are many times no matter what you do, the patient the person you are carring for will die, and it is nobody's fault, just the way it is....life

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    I am new too, and am not sure how this works either...

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    I work in Toronto, as CCU nurse, and have just joined the critical care response team CCRT, which has just started at St. Michael's hospital.

    Just joined today so not sure what this site is like...hope to hear from some of you.



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