Content That Jolie Likes

Jolie 33,177 Views

Joined: Oct 17, '01; Posts: 9,619 (48% Liked) ; Likes: 14,059

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  • Feb 9

    My thought is naps should be taken in the classroom or some other area and not in a potentially infectious environment; end of story - no further discussion.

  • Feb 9

    I would think a scheduled nap should take place some where other than the nurse's office and be monitored by his para. You should not be left to babysit for his nap time nor should he have to be exposed to all of the funk/germs/noise that come with being in the nurse's office. Surely there is an extra classroom that can be utilized for this kiddo.

  • Jan 26

    Quote from Jolie
    What is a "nut aware" school?

    I can think of a couple of working definitions that have nothing to do with food consumption.
    We cannot say nut-free because we provide some prepackaged snacks (such as popcorn, gold fish crackers, etc) that may be processed on equipment that has encountered tree nuts or peanuts. No tree nuts, peanuts, nor their oils or butters can be brought into our school.

  • Jan 7

    I think we're being snookered here.

    Patient? Family? Friend? Homework?

    Or else my cynicism is sneaking thru again.

    Popcorn?

  • Jan 7

    Sounds a bit like a homework question! That being said medication is often a last resort. Supported living is not the same as residential treatment. A group home or supported living apartment allows a person to have a degree of independence while also having structure. I don't think the Psychiatrist needs to go to meds immediately. Seeing how the patient does in a supported environment is entirely appropriate.

    Hppy

  • Nov 5 '17

    Look forward and forget about it. Your lead nurse should be the one responsible for sitting in on interviews.

  • Oct 29 '17

    I am assuming this is not intended for patients in an acute care hospital, especially with sudden acute pain or fresh post op.

    Perhaps it's maybe something for a doctor and patient to think about, discuss, in a doctor's office if the patient is not getting good pain relief and or needing more and more opiods.

    Confession, I have never had chronic pain. And I'm not a fan of alternative medicine. However I am beginning to accept that opiods don't always work for long term chronic pain and opiods have side effects that may exacerbate the original insult.

    Pain and opiods need to be reevaluated. The same way medicine has come to realize common bacterial infections and antibiotics ended up doing way more harm than good.

  • Oct 28 '17

    Go for your last day, but do nursing the way you want to. No scripts, no Q15min documentation. Spend time with the patients, and if you get an admit during the last hour, tuck them in and leave the paperwork for the next sucker. Enjoy the shift.

  • Oct 28 '17

    Quote from Emergent
    The texture is created by egg whites, and is not 'cakey'.

    Yummy. Now I want some cake/cake-like/anything in the shape of a cake

  • Oct 28 '17

    Quote from treeye
    Thanks for the great advices. I did go in and worked my last day. Surprisingly someone went to get a huge cake, pizza and pop and threw me a party. I got to say goodbye with everyone.

    I was so glad I did not call off. Six years went by so fast and I did not know how attached I was to my workplace till my last day.
    I told you there'd be cake.

  • Oct 28 '17

    I have found in life the best course is to always take the high road. Don't let them drag you down to their level or give them the satisfaction.

  • Oct 28 '17

    Did you really just ask a bunch of nurse whether you should stick it to a bunch of nurses?

  • Oct 28 '17

    Quote from AutumnApple
    Calling off would, in my opinion, further the "people are a convenience" culture you're experiencing. It would be saying: "Since I don't get the social support I want, you're no longer of use to me, and calling off is easier to do. Whether my call off hurts you or not is of no consequence to me."

    So, your first decision is whether you want to play their game or not. Calling off is playing their game. The second (and third, and fourth, and infinity) decision you're facing is whether to act like that yourself, or not, the next time this sort of thing presents itself to you. Next time you're leaving a job, perhaps you won't feel so burnt by the reaction of others if you see it for what it is. Also, when you're on the other side of the fence and someone else is the one leaving, you'll perhaps not be like your current coworkers are being.
    What great advice!

    If you don't like/agree with the way these people are acting, why in the world would you want to "reply in kind" i.e. act like they do?

  • Oct 28 '17

    Work the last day. Take some food in as a gift to your coworkers. Thank each one who has been good to you, just say good bye and good wishes to the others, if any.

    Don't sacrifice your rehire ability or lose your vacation time (which I don't think would be kosher with the Dept. of Labor, but I'm not sure about that). Soon it will all be over and you will not have burned your bridges with these people.

  • Oct 28 '17

    Quote from treeye
    I have given my two weeks notice in and I'm tempting to call off on my last day. I was wondering why my coworkers have been doing this but now I totally understand.

    I was treated very differently in my last two weeks: People order lunch take-outs without asking me, they sit at different tables during lunches. One day, I was the only one without an orientee. Those who I considered "my friend" are distancing themselves. I have always been considerate for my coworkers and I get along with most people at work, this does hurt my feelings.

    In addition, the morale at my work is very low. I am the 5th nurse quit on my floor in the past two months. We lost more than half of our staff in the past two years. The administration does not care. We worked short for so long and now they finally brought in agency nurses.

    anyway, I don't want to burn any bridges but now I know why it has been a tradition at my work to call off on the last day. I love my job but I just hate to be there.
    I do understand feeling a bit stung by the "You're not one of us" reaction you described. Saying I understand it and agreeing with it are completely different things though.

    The two week notice time period can play itself out a million ways. This is just one of them. Your current coworkers see you as an outsider now. In essence, you are, so no bones to pick there.

    I have been in situations though where I was leaving a job (for good reasons, often not because the place I was at was toxic) where I felt I had made a connection with people. When I saw how quickly I became an outsider in their eyes, I resented it. Some things should transcend being at the same workplace, or so I thought.

    Truth is, most workplace relations are relations of convenience. Even the ones where we meet the person outside work or share personal experiences or any other number of things that make us believe we've gone beyond a simple situation of coworkers getting along. When my being on their team was near it's end, my usefulness to them too was near an end. I was no longer convenient. I was treated as such.

    Your dilemma is not one of finding out whether calling off the last day is a good decision or not. If it were just that, the choice would be easy: Do it if you benefit from it, don't do it if you're only calling off for "revenge".

    The choice you are faced with it this: Do you support treating others as though they cease to exist once their usefulness to you ends? Are you someone who believes in friendships of convenience?

    Calling off would, in my opinion, further the "people are a convenience" culture you're experiencing. It would be saying: "Since I don't get the social support I want, you're no longer of use to me, and calling off is easier to do. Whether my call off hurts you or not is of no consequence to me."

    So, your first decision is whether you want to play their game or not. Calling off is playing their game. The second (and third, and fourth, and infinity) decision you're facing is whether to act like that yourself, or not, the next time this sort of thing presents itself to you. Next time you're leaving a job, perhaps you won't feel so burnt by the reaction of others if you see it for what it is. Also, when you're on the other side of the fence and someone else is the one leaving, you'll perhaps not be like your current coworkers are being.


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