Latest Comments by mercykitten

mercykitten 1,080 Views

Joined: Oct 13, '01; Posts: 45 (0% Liked)

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    "Mr. Jones, I have been meaning to talk to you about your cholesterol levels. You need to take a pill to lower those levels as well as change your diet. No more salt or fatty foods for you." said Nurse Smith.
    "Nurse, I do not wish to discuss this." replied Mr. Jones.
    "You may wish to avoid this conversation about your cholesterol, but it doesn't change the facts. Your life depends on addressing these problems," Nurse Smith responded.
    "But," replies Mr. Jones, "this is a private matter and has nothing to do with you. How inappropriate of you to bring up these issues, Nurse."
    Half an hour later in the nurses station, Dr. Hart is discussing Mr. Jones with Nurse Smith as the charge nurse approaches.
    "If we don't get Mr. Jones to address these health issues including his cholestrol and his diet, those stents we just put in are going to clog. He'll end up needing open heart and that doesn't really solve his problems. Nurse, we have to get him on board with this." Dr. Hart leaves the station.
    "Jane," says the charge nurse to Nurse Smith. "I am afraid that you have offended Mr. Smith. He said that you brought up issues he does not wish to discuss. He wants you reprimanded for inflicting your views upon him. Maybe it would be better if you don't discuss these matters with him."

    It isn't about religion. It is about a personal relationship with Jesus. It is okay to bring it up casually to see if the pt wishes to discuss spiritual issues. It is most frequently at night that patients wish to discuss this. As someone who has faced a potentially fatal disease, the afterlife is on your mind a great deal. We have to respect boundaries, not force the topic on someone, but asking us not to say anything at all is like asking Nurse Smith to take no action to save Mr. Jones.

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    I want to be encouraging and there is good news. While my back pain never completely goes away, it is better at times. But what I have found is that I have learned to tolerate the pain better. Pain that would have had me calling into work, doesn't seem as bad. All pain is personal. I think that we all have to learn how to deal with it.
    I am not trying to play down your pain at all.
    Actually I have become thankful for my back pain. Because this year I have had to go through chemo and radiation treatments for cancer. The back pain taught me a lot that helped me handle my treatments.
    I don't know if this posting will help you much or not. But I will keep you in my prayers....other people's prayers have helped me a lot this year.
    God bless you.

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    First, no one has mentioned that the vomiting nurse may have been pregnant. That happens quite frequently with our co-workers (since we are a predominantly female occupation). Several of my co-workers had frequent n/v....and were saving their sick time for their maternity leave.
    But I must confess that I have worked sick. Early in my career it was because there frequently wasn't anyone to replace me (back in the days of team leading where I was the only RN for 20-44 pts). I don't work sick as often now.....I am older and just can't. Plus now I am working mostly 12 hr shifts. I have called in on days that I would have worked if I had been scheduled for 8 hrs....but being sick, just couldn't go the 12 hrs.
    But I have also worked sick because of sick policies (just allowed 4 occurences/rolling year) and if you miss on your weekend, you have to make it up by working one of your weekends off. I only get every other weekend off, so that would put me working three weekends out of four in the month. My husband also works every other weekend, so it really messes us up.
    Anyone else have a simliar experience?

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    Well, folks, I am in KY so am not suffering the power outage myself. But I do have a family member that works in NYC. He works at the Times so still has to work....just like hospital people....One of those other jobs that even if the end of the world is coming, you still have to work.
    Anyway, when you get power back (or some of you may have some partial power like the Times, whose computers are working), please take a moment and share with us your stories about going through this blackout.
    Please know too, that your brothers and sisters in nursing are supporting you, and care about you.
    Thanks everyone for sharing and caring.

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    12 hr shifts are great until.....you end up on more or less permanent mandatory overtime to cover for the nursing shortage. Then we are working four days a week.....yeah, that extra day may be an 8 hr shift,....but I feel like if I am working 4 days, might as well work five 8 hrs days and have a bit of a life on the working days. With 12 hr shifts it doesn't leave much of the day for anything else other than sleep and getting ready for work.
    Also, as we nurses age, those 12 hr shifts get longer.

    I have worked nights most of my working life. Just recently gone to day shift, still getting used to it. It is more busy, but at least I am trying to sleep at the same time as my neighbors!

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    Whose hospital isn't talking about cutting costs? We hear this at every unit meeting.
    While it is true that governmental budget cuts have impacted all of health care, the ceo's and other high level administrators aren't taking cuts to their pay, and are still getting bonuses that the grunts (you and me) who do the real work are no longer getting.
    In a previous post "what does your ceo make?", a news story in a Sunday paper was quoted as saying that the ceo at this local hospital was making almost $700, 000 a year. The DON was pulling in more than $300,000.
    And, yes, RN's in some places in KY are being laid off. But no high administrative people have been touched.
    Anyone got some thoughts on that?

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    Munson, and DN, many of our fellow nurses become disabled every year. For some it is in an unfortunate accident (which night shift and long hours have proven to be a factor), an incident at work or part of the aging process.
    There are several threads which have previously been started on this issue. But it is a good one to continue.
    I speak from personal experience. I still work at a hospital but not as a nurse and took a big pay cut just to have a job. I have received virtually no support from my hospital to get another position that would use my skills. I am a seasoned nurse with more than 15 yrs experience, my BSN and ACLS. But my hospital won't even let me work in the nursery because of a 50 lbs. lifting requirement. I haven't seen too many 50 lbs. babies, have you?
    Anyway, I just wanted to let you know that many people are with you. We have been there and still are there. Many of us still have to deal with a significant amount of pain.
    Hang in there! We care about you. :kiss

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    A newspaper article in our Sunday paper revealed the fact that the ceo at our hospital makes almost $700,000 a year. The vice president of nursing makes over $300,00 a year.
    And we have been told to do everything possible to save the hospital money. We have lost medicare payments due to the budget crunch.
    Tonight we "saved the hospital money" by working with a smaller staff since we had discharged many patients from our floor. That worked fine until admitting started filling us up.
    Anyone else have any ideas on saving money for the hospital? By the way, I know for a fact that at least one employee at our hosp is living in the homeless shelter.
    .....So what is your ceo making?

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    I saw a breakdown maps of SARS in United States yesterday on MSN-WebMD. While SARS is in the US, there have been no deaths yet. But it is in several states, but not yet in KY.
    We do need to take precautions.....right now spring break is coming up, so we will have mass travel to warm spots (Fla.)....after spring break could prove interesting....
    Let's just hang in here together.

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    Mattsmom and all, howdy. I have had a rough week or so.
    I was scheduled 8 hrs on the 4 th and then three 12 hrs Fri, Sat, Sun. Went in early at 7 p.m. on the 4 th because they were short (also my husband was at work, so no conflicts there).
    Thursday night my little toe started getting irritated. There was a growth on it above the nail bed, that hadn't been bothering me. Friday morning I get home, the growth starts bleeding. had a hard time getting it to stop. So I dressed it, went to bed. Saturday am picked up peroxide and started dossing it with H2O2 and neosporin. Did it again when I got up, before I went to work.
    Well, Sunday morning I get home, take the dressing off, and my toe is red, warm....infected. Darn, guys, as you have probably surmissed, I am diabetic. I call in sick to work and go to Immediate Care. They start me on an antibiotic.
    Monday night I check my blood sugar....it is 309. So I had been diet controlled.....called my dr and am now on sliding scale insulin.
    My toe was looking really bad.....my husband, an EMT, kept telling me "honey, if they want to put you in the hospital...."
    Of course, I kept saying"no. I'd rather stay home." There isn't much I can't do for myself. And we, as I am sure you all have, occurances of MRSA. I feel like I'd be much more likely to get that in the hospital.
    Monday I switched to betadine after the H2O2. When I see the dr late Tuesday, the toe is just slightly red, but the growth is turning black. Thankfully my dr removed that growth.
    Well, any way, I am still trying to get my blood sugars under control.....especially after having my glucometer die on Tuesday (along with the ac in my car). Well, a quick run to Wal-Mart took care of the glucometer....got a new one.
    Anyway, I hope you all had a better week than I did. I may start some new post about some of this. Any other comments from our old friends (of this post) or any new ones?

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    P_RN, I am sorry that you had that experience. Thank you for sharing. I guess the best thing to do when looking at a pain clinic is to talk with people who have been there. Were they helped? Any down sides? How many doctors in the clinic and who did they have ? Any bad experiences with a different doctor on call for the clinic? Any other questions that anyone can think of?
    Obviously, try to do some research online to know what options are available and to know what to expect.
    And when you go, ask plenty of questions. If you don't like the answers, tell them you want to consider your options and thanks for the info. Then consider it. After full consideration if you don't like it, look elsewhere.
    Any further advice on this subject? You all just come on and jump in.

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    The various people who have discussed their problems on this thread have been open to sharing their own methods of coping with a very difficult situation. I hope that none of the healthy, able people reading this will ever go through what we have.
    I am pursuing several of the suggestions from this board. But the biggest help for all of us has been that we are not alone in this type of mess.
    Please continue to post here. We can help each other. Thank you to all who have written here.

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    Mattsmom, if I or others want 8 hr shifts (they do, most of the rest of the people having back trouble are day shift), it would mean hiring another person. I don't think my manager will do that; I am not sure that she would be allowed to do that.
    Apparently, there is a lot of concern about the extra pay incentives for the nurses.....that the hospital is cutting corners in every other department. What is amazing is that the nurses at my hospital are the lowest paid nurses in our state.
    I haven't really said anything to my manager about my back acting up.....I have had to be off work with it. I just figured that I am stuck with 12 hrs shifts if I want to work. And I have to work, financially. Of course, that is the course I was taking until I found out that everyone else is having back trouble.
    Mattsmom, having you tried the new thermacare wraps.....they are disposable and give you heat for 8 hrs or more (mine lasted about 12 hrs.) It did seem to help my muscles.
    Also has anyone else been reading the posting about "no lift risk management". Such a change in policy could lessen the chances of other nurses ending up in our shoes.

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    I, too, would be interested in any info about "no lift" risk management. Please send me an email if you have such info. Thank you.

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    Mattsmom, I started a reply earlier today, had it mostly written and got bumped. Don't know if I remember everything in the original message, but the most important thing is this: maybe you need to see a rheumotoidologist for your different joint pains and symptoms.
    From what you are saying it sounds like a couple or so possiblities: arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and others including fibromylgia.
    I think in my situation, the boss is going to get some new chairs. I don't think that it is just the ergonomics....I think that it is working 12 hrs shifts as a MT. And having to be back in 12 hrs....you know when you get home, there is always stuff to do. Plus sleeping during the day isn't easy. So I also figure lack of sleep is part of it....I would get more sleep if I didn't have to back in at 7 p.m.
    Also Webmd just had a research show that on 6 hrs of sleep a day (not 8) causes inflammation to develope. Isn't that interesting.
    All for now. Hugs to you too.


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